Egg and Turkey Sausage Bake

May 15, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | 1 Comment
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Here’s another Jennie – O Breakfast or Brunch Recipe, Egg and Turkey Sausage Bake. This one is made using JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Sausage, Egg Substitute, Milk, Parsley, Salt, Ground Pepper, French Bread, Red Bell Pepper, and Shredded Low Fat Swiss Cheese. Another good one to start your day! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the Switch in 2020! https://www.jennieo.com/

Egg and Turkey Sausage Bake
There’s only so much time in the weekend, so let your oven do the work! This simple comfort food brunch recipe has a 15-minute prep time and boasts lean breakfast sausage, bell peppers and French bread.

INGREDIENTS
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Sausage
2 cups egg substitute or 8 eggs
3 cups milk
¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
salt and freshly ground pepper, if desired
8 cups cubed French bread
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
1½ cups shredded low-fat Swiss cheese, divided

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 350°F. Grease 9 x 13-inch baking pan; set aside. Cook the sausage as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Crumble sausage into pieces.
2) In large bowl, whisk eggs, milk and parsley. Add salt and pepper, if desired. Stir in sausage, bread cubes, red pepper and 1 cup cheese. Pour into baking dish. Sprinkle with remaining cheese. Bake 40 to 45 minutes or until a knife inserted into the center comes out clean. Let stand 10 minutes before cutting into squares to serve.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 290
Protein 28g
Carbohydrates 25g
Fiber 1g
Sugars 7g
Fat 8g
Cholesterol 70mg
Sodium 940mg
Saturated Fat 2.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/571-egg-and-turkey-sausage-bake

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Pecan-Cranberry Upside-Down Cake

May 14, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | 2 Comments
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is a Pecan-Cranberry Upside-Down Cake. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Light Margarine, Cranberries, Brown Sugar Blend Splenda, Pecans, Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Flour, Baking Powder, Salt, Cinnamon, Baking Powder, Egg Substitute, Milk, Almond Extract, Canola Oil, and Fat-Free Nondairy Whipped Topping. This isn’t your average Upside Down Cake! The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Pecan-Cranberry Upside-Down Cake
This moist and delicious upside-down cake is the perfect complement for your holiday table!

Ingredients
Preparation time: 5 minutes
Cooking time: 30 minutes.

2 tablespoons light margarine
1/2 cup fresh or frozen cranberries
1/2 cup Brown Sugar Blend Splenda, No Calorie Sweetener, granular
1/4 cup chopped pecans
1 cup Splenda, No Calorie Sweetener, granular
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 cup liquid egg substitute
1 cup skim milk
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
1/4 cup Enova or canola oil
Fat-free nondairy whipped topping (optional)

Directions
Yield: 10 servings
Serving size: 1/10th of cake

* Heat oven to 350°F. Melt light margarine in microwave or over low heat in small skillet on stove. Pour melted margarine into a 9-inch nonstick round cake pan, and use a pastry brush to evenly spread the margarine across the bottom of the pan. In a small bowl, combine cranberries, Brown Sugar Blend Splenda, and pecans. Pour mixture over melted margarine in an even layer. In another small bowl, combine Splenda (white), flour, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon and stir well with a spoon. Add liquid egg substitute, milk, almond extract, and oil, and stir until batter is smooth. Pour batter over fruit and nut mixture evenly. Bake for 30 minutes, or until lightly brown on top. Remove from oven and allow to cool 5 minutes, then carefully invert using protective gloves onto a serving plate and remove pan. Allow cake to cool. Cut into 10 slices and top each with 1 tablespoon fat-free nondairy whipped topping if desired.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 165 calories, Carbohydrates: 17 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 9 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 1 mg, Sodium: 289 mg, Fiber: 4 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/pecan-cranberry-upside-down-cake/

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One of America’s Favorites – Corn fritter

April 27, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Bowl of corn fritters

Corn fritters are fritters made of corn. Originating in Native American cuisine, they are a traditional sweet and savory snack in the Southern United States, as well as Indonesia where they are known as perkedel jagung or bakwan jagung.

Native Americans had been using ground corn (maize) as food for thousands of years before European explorers arrived in the New World. Corn-based products, such as corn flatbread, arepa and cornbread were staple foods in Pre-Columbian Americas. Native Americans did not use deep frying techniques, however, which require ample supplies of cooking oil as well as equipment in which the oil can be heated to high temperatures.

European settlers learned recipes and processes for corn dishes from Native Americans, and soon devised their own cornmeal-based variations of European breads made from grains available on that continent. The corn fritter probably was invented in the Southern United States, whose traditional cuisine contains a lot of deep fried foods, none more famous perhaps than Southern fried chicken.

Bakwan jagung, Indonesian corn fritters

On the other side of the world, maize seeds from the Americas were introduced into Southeast Asia in the late 16th century through Spanish and Portuguese traders. The plant thrived in the tropical climate of Indonesia, and soon became a staple food plant in drier areas of central and southeastern Indonesia, since it requires much less water than wet rice. Coconut and palm oil have been essential elements of Indonesian cuisine for centuries. The deep fried technique using palm oil was probably borrowed from Portuguese colonists; and Indonesia has its own type of corn fritter, called perkedel jagung or bakwan jagung.

Ingredients

Southern United States
Traditional corn fritters in the American South use corn kernels, egg, flour, milk, and melted butter. They can be deep fried, shallow fried, baked, and may be served with jam, fruit, honey, or cream. They may also be made with creamed corn, baked, and served with maple syrup. Corn fritters can be made to have a similar appearance to, and thus be mistaken for, johnnycake.

Indonesia
Indonesian corn fritters are not sweet but savory. They have a more granulated texture, as the corn kernels are not finely ground and blended into the dough, so they retain their kernel shapes. The fritter is made from fresh corn kernels, wheat flour, rice flour, celery, scallion, eggs, shallots, garlic, salt and pepper, and deep fried in coconut oil. They are a popular snack and are often served as an appetizer.

 

Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe – Stuffed Pork Loin Genoa Style

April 26, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe | 2 Comments
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This week’s Sunday’s Pork Roast Dinner Recipe is a Stuffed Pork Loin Genoa Style. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be using a Boneless Pork Loin Roast, Basil, Parsley, Pine Nuts, Garlic, Grated Parmesan Cheese, Ground Pork, Italian Sausage, Bread Crumbs, Milk, Egg, Kosher Salt, and Pepper. Stuffed is good! The recipe is from the CooksRecipes website. At the Cooks site you’ll find a huge selection of recipes to please all Tastes, Diets, or Cuisines so be sure to check it out today for any of recipe needs! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Stuffed Pork Loin Genoa Style
This colorful, Italian-style stuffed roast makes a flavorful centerpiece to your next gathering. Treat your guests by serving this along side of sautéed patty-pan squash.

Recipe Ingredients:
4 to 5 pound boneless pork loin roast
1/2 cup fresh basil, chopped
1 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1/2 cup pine nuts
6 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/2 pound ground pork
1/2 pound Italian sausage
1 cup dry bread crumbs
1/4 cup milk
1 large egg
1/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
Kosher or sea salt to taste
1 teaspoon ground black pepper

Cooking Directions:
1 – In a food processor or blender, blend together the fresh basil, 1 cup parsley, pine nuts, garlic and Parmesan cheese. Set aside.
2 – Mix together well the ground pork, Italian sausage, bread crumbs, milk, egg, remaining parsley, salt and pepper.
3 – Butterfly pork loin by cutting through roast horizontally to within 1/4-inch of the other side. Do not cut all the way through. Open out to roughly a rectangle. Spread with the herb-cheese mixture and place the ground pork mixture along center of loin. Fold in half, tie; roast at 350°F (175°C) for 1 1/2 hours. Slice to serve.
Makes 10 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/pork/stuffed_pork_loin_genoa_style_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Cornbread

February 10, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Cornbread is a generic name for any number of quick breads containing cornmeal and leavened by baking powder.

Skillet cornbread

Native Americans were using ground corn (maize) for food thousands of years before European explorers arrived in the New World. European settlers, especially those who resided in the southern English colonies, learned the original recipes and processes for corn dishes from the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek, and soon they devised recipes for using cornmeal in breads similar to those made of grains available in Europe. Cornbread has been called a “cornerstone” of Southern United States cuisine. Cornmeal is produced by grinding dry raw corn grains. A coarser meal (compare flour) made from corn is grits. Grits are produced by soaking raw corn grains in hot water containing calcium hydroxide (the alkaline salt), which loosens the grain hulls (bran) and increases the nutritional value of the product (by increasing available niacin and available amino acids). These are separated by washing and flotation in water, and the now softened slightly swelled grains are called hominy. Hominy, posole in Spanish, also is ground into masa harina for tamales and tortillas). This ancient Native American technology has been named nixtamalization. Besides cornbread, Native Americans used corn to make numerous other dishes from the familiar hominy grits to alcoholic beverages (such as Andean chicha). Cornbread was popular during the American Civil War because it was very cheap and could be made in many different forms—high-rising, fluffy loaves or simply fried (as unleavened pone, corn fritters, hoecakes, etc.)
“ To a far greater degree than anyone realizes, several of the most important food dishes that the Southeastern Indians live on today is the “soul food” eaten by both black and white Southerners. Hominy, for example, is still eaten … Sofkee live on as grits … cornbread is used by Southern cooks … Indian fritters … variously known as “hoe cake”, … or “Johnny cake“. … Indian boiled cornbread is present in Southern cuisine as “corn meal dumplings”, … and as “hush puppies”, … Southerners cook their beans and field peas by boiling them, as did the Indians … like the Indians they cure their meat and smoke it over hickory coals. ”
—- Charles Hudson, The Southeastern Indians.

Types of cornbread

Home baked cornbread made with blue cornmeal

Cornbread is a popular item in soul food enjoyed by many people for its texture and aroma. Cornbread can be baked, fried or, rarely, steamed. Steamed cornbread is mushy, chewier and more like cornmeal pudding than what most consider to be traditional cornbread. Cornbread can also be baked into corn cakes.

* Baked cornbread – Cornbread is a common bread in United States cuisine, particularly associated with the South and Southwest, as well as being a traditional staple for populations where wheat flour was more expensive. In some parts of the South it is crumbled into a glass of cold milk or buttermilk and eaten with a spoon, and it is also widely eaten with barbecue and chili con carne. In rural areas of the southern United States in the mid 20th century cornbread, accompanied by pinto beans (often called soup beans in this context) or honey, was a common lunch for poor children. It is still a common side dish, often served with homemade butter, chunks of onion or scallions. Cornbread crumbs are also used in some poultry stuffings; cornbread stuffing is particularly associated with Thanksgiving turkeys.

In the United States, Northern and Southern cornbread are different because they generally use different types of corn meal and varying degrees of sugar and eggs. A preference for sweetness and adding sugar or molasses can be found in both regions, but salty or savory tastes are sometimes more common in the South, and thus favor using buttermilk in the batter or such additions as cracklins. Cornbread is occasionally crumbled and served with cold milk similar to cold cereal. In Texas, the Mexican influence has spawned a hearty cornbread made with fresh or creamed corn kernels, jalapeño peppers and topped with shredded cheese.

* Skillet-fried or skillet-baked cornbread (often simply called skillet bread or hoecake depending on the container in which it is cooked) is a traditional staple in the rural United States, especially in the South. This involves heating bacon drippings, lard or other oil in a heavy, well-seasoned cast iron skillet in an oven, and then pouring a batter made from cornmeal, egg, and milk directly into the hot grease. The mixture is returned to the oven to bake into a large, crumbly and sometimes very moist cake with a crunchy crust. This bread tends to be dense and usually served as an accompaniment rather than as a bread served as a regular course. In addition to the skillet method, such cornbread also may be made in sticks, muffins, or loaves.
A slightly different variety, cooked in a simple baking dish, is associated with northern US cuisine; it tends to be sweeter and lighter than southern-style cornbread; the batter for northern-style cornbread is very similar to and sometimes interchangeable with that of a corn muffin. A typical contemporary northern U.S. cornbread recipe contains half wheat flour, half cornmeal, milk or buttermilk, eggs, leavening agent, salt, and usually sugar, resulting in a bread that is somewhat lighter and sweeter than the traditional southern version. In the border states and parts of the Upper South, a cross between the two traditions is known as “light cornbread.”
Unlike fried variants of cornbread, baked cornbread is a quick bread that is dependent on an egg-based protein matrix for its structure (though the addition of wheat flour adds gluten to increase its cohesiveness). The baking process gelatinizes the starch in the cornmeal, but still often leaves some hard starch to give the finished product a distinctive sandiness not typical of breads made

Cornbread, prepared as a muffin

from other grains.

* Corn pone – Corn pone (sometimes referred to as “Indian pone“) is a type of cornbread made from a thick, malleable cornmeal dough (which is usually egg-less and milk-less) and baked in a specific type of iron pan over an open fire (such as a frontiersman would use), using butter, margarine, or cooking oil. Corn pones have been a staple of Southern U.S. cuisine, and have been discussed by many American writers, including Mark Twain.
In the Appalachian Mountains, cornbread baked in a round iron skillet or in a cake pan of any shape is still referred to as a “pone” of cornbread (as opposed to “hoe cakes,” the term for cornbread fried in pancake style), and when biscuit dough (i.e., “biscuits” in the American sense of the word) is occasionally baked in one large cake rather than as separate biscuits this is called a “biscuit pone.”
The term “corn pone” is sometimes used derogatively to refer to one who possesses certain rural, unsophisticated peculiarities (“he’s a corn pone”), or as an adjective to describe particular rural, folksy or “hick” characteristics (e.g., “corn pone” humor). This pejorative term often is directed at persons from rural areas of the southern and midwestern U.S. President John F. Kennedy‘s staffers, who despised Texan Vice-President Lyndon B. Johnson, used to refer to him behind his back as ‘Uncle Cornpone’ or ‘Rufus Cornpone’.

* Hot water cornbread – Cooked on a rangetop, one frying method involves pouring a small amount of liquid batter made with boiling water and self-rising cornmeal (cornmeal with soda or some other chemical leavener added) into a skillet of hot oil, and allowing the crust to turn golden and crunchy while the center of the batter cooks into a crumbly, mushy bread. These small (3-4″ diameter) fried breads are soft and very rich. Sometimes, to ensure the consistency of the bread, a small amount of wheat flour is added to the batter. This type of cornbread is often known as “hot water” or “scald meal” cornbread and is unique to the American South.

Johnnycakes on a plate

* Johnnycakes – Pouring a batter similar to that of skillet-fried cornbread, but slightly thinner, into hot grease atop a griddle or a skillet produces a pancake-like bread called a johnnycake. This type of cornbread is prevalent in New England, particularly in Rhode Island, and also in the American Midwest and the American South. It is reminiscent of the term hoecake, used in the American South for fried cornbread pancakes, which may date back to stories about some people on the frontier making cornbread patties on the blade of a hoe.

* Hushpuppies – A thicker buttermilk-based batter which is deep-fried rather than pan-fried, forms the hushpuppy, a common accompaniment to fried fish and other seafood in the South. Hushpuppy recipes vary from state to state, some including onion seasoning, chopped onions, beer, or jalapeños. Fried properly, the hushpuppy will be moist and yellow or white on the inside, while crunchy and light to medium-dark golden brown on the outside.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 14, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Got Milk…………………

Milk DOES do a body good – especially for the development and maintenance of strong bones and teeth. But milk is a health plus only IF you can digest it readily. … Milk is also especially rich in vitamin B12 and potassium. All milk is fortified (it’s added separately) with vitamin D and helps boosts calcium absorption.

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Bread Pudding Snacks

December 19, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is Bread Pudding Snacks. Made using Reduced-Fat (2%) Milk, Egg Substitute, Sugar, Vanilla, Salt, Ground Nutmeg, Cinnamon-Raisin Bread, and Butter. Only 72 calories and 12 carbs per serving. You can find this recipe at the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll also find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. I’ve left a link to subscribe to it at the end of the post. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Bread Pudding Snacks
These scrumptious treats deliver classic flavor without all the carbohydrate. This low-carb recipe is easy to prepare and yields 12 servings, making it a perfect dessert for a family get-together.

Ingredients
1 1/4 cups reduced-fat (2%) milk
1/2 cup cholesterol-free egg substitute
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg (optional)
4 cups 1/2-inch cinnamon or cinnamon-raisin bread cubes (about 6 bread slices)
1 tablespoon margarine or butter, melted

Directions
1 – Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 12 medium-size muffin cups with paper baking cups.

2 – Combine milk, egg substitute, sugar, vanilla, salt, and nutmeg, if desired, in medium bowl; mix well. Add bread; mix until well moistened. Let stand at room temperature 15 minutes.

3 – Spoon bread mixture evenly into prepared cups; drizzle evenly with margarine.

4 – Bake 30 to 35 minutes or until snacks are puffed and golden brown. Remove to wire rack to cool completely.

Note: Snacks will puff up in the oven and fall slightly upon cooling.

Yield: 12 servings.

Serving size: 1 snack cup.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 72 calories, Carbohydrates: 12 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 2 mg, Sodium: 93 mg, Fiber: 0 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/bread-pudding-snacks/

 

 


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Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Savory Crescent Turkey Squares

November 29, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | 1 Comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is Savory Crescent Turkey Squares. For this week’s Jennie – O Recipes I’ve got a couple of recipes to deal with those Delicious Thanksgiving Leftovers! This one is a recipe for Savory Crescent Turkey Squares. Using Cream Cheese, Butter, Cubed Jennie – O Turkey Breast, Milk, Onion, 1 can of Refrigerated Crescent Roll Dough, and Croutons. You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Savory Crescent Turkey Squares
Hit a homerun with the family tonight with these homemade pockets of hot, savory turkey in a creamy sauce. Great for cooking with leftovers, this great American dinner is extremely kid-friendly.

INGREDIENTS
1 (3-ounce) package cream cheese, softened
3 tablespoons butter, divided, softened
2 cups cubed JENNIE-O® Turkey Breast Roast
2 tablespoons milk
1 tablespoon chopped onion
¼ teaspoon salt, if desired
⅛ teaspoon black pepper
1 (8-ounce) can refrigerated crescent roll dough
½ cup seasoned croutons, crushed

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 350°F.
2) In bowl, combine cream cheese and 2 tablespoons butter. Stir until smooth. Add turkey, milk, onion, salt and pepper; mix together.
3) Separate dough into 4 rectangles, sealing perforations. Spoon turkey mixture on one end of rectangle. Fold other end of dough over filling. Seal edges with fork. Place on baking pan. Brush tops with 1 tablespoon melted butter. Sprinkle with crushed croutons.
4) Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until golden brown.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 410
Protein 35g
Carbohydrates 27g
Fiber 0g
Sugars 6g
Fat 19g
Cholesterol 90mg
Sodium 960mg
Saturated Fat 9g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/237-savory-crescent-turkey-squares

One of America’s Favorites – French Toast

November 11, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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French toast served at a restaurant

French toast is a dish made of sliced bread soaked in eggs and milk, then fried. Alternative names and variants include eggy bread, Bombay toast, German toast, gypsy toast, poor knights (of Windsor), torrija and Arme Riddere.

The earliest known reference to French toast is in the Apicius, a collection of Latin recipes dating to the 4th or 5th century, where it is described as simply aliter dulcia (“another sweet dish”). The recipe says to “slice fine white bread, remove the crust, and break it into large pieces. Soak these pieces in milk and beaten egg, fry in oil, and cover with honey before serving.”

A fourteenth-century German recipe uses the name Arme Ritter (“poor knights”), a name also used in English and the Nordic languages. Also in the fourteenth century, Taillevent presented a recipe for “tostées dorées”. Italian 15th-century culinary expert Martino da Como offers a recipe.

The usual French name is pain perdu, “lost bread”, reflecting its use of stale or otherwise “lost” bread — which gave birth to the metaphoric term pain perdu for sunk costs. It may also be called pain doré, “golden bread”, in Canada. There are fifteenth-century English recipes for pain perdu

An Austrian and Bavarian term is pafese or pofese, from zuppa pavese, referring to Pavia, Italy. The word “soup” in the dish’s name refers to bread soaked in a liquid, a sop. In Hungary, it is commonly called bundáskenyér (lit. “furry bread”).

French toast topped with fruit, butter and cream, served with maple syrup.

Slices of bread are soaked or dipped in a mixture of beaten eggs, often whisked with milk or cream. Sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, and vanilla may be variously added to the mixture. The bread is then fried in butter or olive oil until browned and cooked through. Day-old bread is often used, both for its thrift and because it will soak up more egg mixture without falling apart.

The cooked slices may be served with sugar or sweet toppings such as jam, honey, fruit, or maple syrup.

According to the Compleat Cook (1659) as quoted in the OED, the bread was dipped in milk only, with the egg mixture added afterwards.

Alternatively, the bread may be soaked in wine, rosewater, or orange juice, either before or after cooking.

French toast was popularly served in railroad dining cars of the early and mid-20th century. The Santa Fe was especially known for its French toast, and most of the railroads provided recipes of these and other dining car offerings to the public as a promotional feature.

 

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Turkey Chorizo Mac and Cheese

September 20, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is Turkey Chorizo Mac and Cheese. Made using JENNIE-O® Chorizo Seasoning Turkey Sausage along with Whole Grain Elbow Macaroni, Eggs, Milk, Seasonings, Bell Peppers, Black Beans, Corn, Cheddar Cheese, Monterey Jack Cheese, Butter, and Breadcrumbs. You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey Chorizo Mac and Cheese
It’s time to turn up the heat on your homemade mac and cheese! Our Turkey Chorizo Mac and Cheese combines everything you love about baked mac and cheese recipes with the savory addition of black beans, bell peppers, and chorizo. Your family will love this easy, spicy take on classic comfort food.

INGREDIENTS
1½ cups whole grain elbow macaroni
1 large egg
¾ cup milk
½ teaspoon granulated garlic
½ teaspoon onion powder
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Chorizo Seasoning Turkey Sausage
½ cup diced green bell pepper
½ cup diced red bell pepper
½ cup black beans, drained
½ cup corn
1½ cups shredded Cheddar cheese
1½ cups shredded Monterey Jack cheese
2 tablespoons butter
1½ cups breadcrumbs

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 350°F.
2) Cook macaroni as specified on the package; set aside.
3) Whisk egg. Add and combine milk, garlic and onion powder; set aside.
4) In 9 x 13-inch baking pan, evenly add chorizo, peppers, beans, corn and cheeses. Stir in macaroni. Pour in milk sauce and stir.
5) In skillet, over medium heat, melt butter. Stir in breadcrumbs. Top turkey mixture evenly with breadcrumbs. Bake 40 to 50 minutes or until golden color. Let set for 15 minutes before cutting.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 470
Protein 31g
Carbohydrates 44g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 4g
Fat 20g
Cholesterol 95mg
Sodium 760mg
Saturated Fat 9g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1247-turkey-chorizo-mac-and-cheese

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