Cincy Cinco 2019 – Saturday May 4, 2019 – 12:00 PM – 11:00 PM

May 1, 2019 at 7:55 AM | Posted in cooking, Food | Leave a comment
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Celebrating Cinco de Mayo with authentic music, culture, food and more. Runs Saturday noon-11 p.m. and Sunday noon-6 p.m. Cinco de Mayo is a day to celebrate Mexican heritage and pride while it is also another great reason to party! Much like St Patricks Day and Oktoberfest, Cinco de Mayo in Cincinnati Ohio has several events and parties at local restaurants & bars. No matter your reasoning for celebrating Cinco de Mayo in Cincinnati OH, you will find plenty of things to do. Around this time of year you will find several parades, Mexican Festivals and of course Margaritas & Corona specials. Not only is this day is a national holiday in Mexico but for most here in Cincinnati OH, Cinco de Mayo 2019 is a day to party and celebrate with friends!
http://events.cincinnati.com/cincinnati_oh/events/cincy-cinco-2019-/E0-001-125000301-3

You don’t have to be Latino to join in the celebration of Cinco de Mayo. The holiday is akin to our Independence Day/Fourth of July holiday and celebrates the victory of the Mexican army’s 1862 victory over the French in the Battle of Puebla during the Franco-Mexican War. You can count on every authentic Latino restaurant in the area being hyper-busy this weekend, so here are a few alternative options for having “mucha fiesta.”

Saturday
Cincy Cinco, noon-11 p.m. Saturday, noon-6 p.m. Sunday, Fountain Square, 520 Vine St., Downtown. Free. Family-friendly event showcases Latino music, culture and food. Children’s area with games, raffles, pinatas, cake and a mascot parade on Saturday. Live music from the region’s hottest Salsa bands. Traditional dances, Hispanic youth orchestra and more. Tacopolis features over a dozen restaurants offering wide variety of tacos and “alambres” (Mexican kabobs), plus Argentinian empanadas, Venezuelan fare and many other tasty treats. Largest Latino cultural celebration in the region. cincy-cinco.com.

https://www.cincinnati.com/story/entertainment/2019/04/30/cinco-de-mayo-events-cincinnati-weekend/3620150002/

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It’s Nuts I tell you……DRIED GUAJILLO MEXICAN PEPPERS

April 11, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in nuts, NUTS COM | Leave a comment
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This week from the nuts.com website (https://nuts.com/) its DRIED GUAJILLO MEXICAN PEPPERS. These Peppers have a Sweet Heat to them and used to make Salsas for Tamales, Chile Sauces, Sopas, or are ground to make Rubs for Meats. This is just one the many selections of Dried Mexican Peppers and Mexican items you can find at the Nuts site (https://nuts.com/). You can choose from items like; NUTS, DRIED FRUIT, CHOCOLATES and SWEETS, SNACKS, COFFEE and TEA, COOKING and BAKING, and GIFTS. Plus there’s FREE shipping on orders over $59, see for details. Now more on the DRIED GUAJILLO MEXICAN PEPPERS. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One!

 

 

 

 

DRIED GUAJILLO MEXICAN PEPPERS
Dried guajillo Mexican peppers come from northern and central Mexico. They are one of the most commonly grown chiles in Mexico. The guajillo chile is related to the pulla. It has a green tea and root flavor with berry tones, and a moderate amount of sweet heat. These peppers are usually used to make salsas for tamales, chile sauces, sopas, or are ground to make rubs for meats.

The stems are not edible, and should be removed during preparation.

* Store in a cool dry place for up to 1 year. It is ok to refrigerate.
Country of origin: Peru

Nutrition Facts
Serving size 50g (~1.8 oz.)
Approx 0 servings

Amount per serving
Calories 162
Calories from Fat 25
%DV
Total Fat 3g 4.5%
Saturated Fat 0.5g 2%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 45mg 2%
Total Carbohydrate 35g 11.5%
Dietary Fiber 14.5g 57.5%
Sugars 20.5g
Protein 5.5g
Vitamin A 265%
Vitamin C 25%
Calcium 2%
Iron 17.5%
https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/mexican/dried-guajillo-mexican-peppers.html

Order securely online or call us:
800-558-6887 or 908-523-0333
Operating Hours (ET):
M-TH 8AM-8PM
F-S 8AM-6:30PM
https://nuts.com/

One of America’s Favorite – Quesadilla

April 27, 2015 at 5:18 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A huitlacoche (corn smut) quesadilla

A huitlacoche (corn smut) quesadilla

A quesadilla (/ˌkeɪsəˈdiːjə/, Spanish About this sound kesaˈðiʝa (help·info)) is a wheat tortilla or a corn tortilla filledwith a savoury mixture containing cheese, other ingredients, and/or vegetables, cooked often on a griddle, then folded in half to form a half-moon shape.

 
The origin of the quesadilla was colonial Mexico. The quesadilla as a food has changed and evolved over many years as people experimented with different variations of it.

 
Original (Mexican) quesadilla

In central and southern regions of Mexico, a quesadilla is a flat circle of cooked corn masa, called a tortilla, warmed to soften it enough to be folded in half, and then filled. They are typically filled with Oaxaca cheese (queso Oaxaca). Oaxaca cheese is a stringy Mexican cheese made by the pasta filata (stretched-curd) method. The quesadilla is then cooked on a comal until the cheese has completely melted. They are usually cooked without the addition of any oil. Often the quesadillas are served with green or red salsa, chopped onion, and guacamole. While Oaxaca (or string) cheese is the most common filling, other ingredients are also used in addition to or even substituting cheese. These can include cooked vegetables, such as potatoes with chorizo, squash blossoms, mushrooms, epazote, huitlacoche, and different types of cooked meat, such as chicharron, tinga made of chicken or beef, or cooked pork. In some places, quesadillas are also topped with other ingredients, in addition to the fillings they already have: avocado or guacamole, chopped onion, tomato, serrano chiles and cilantro are the most common. Salsas may also be added as a topping.

Mexican quesadillas are traditionally cooked on a comal, which is also used to prepare tortillas. As a variation, the quesadillas can be fried in oil to make quesadillas fritas. The main difference is while the traditional ones are prepared just filling the partially cooked tortillas, then continue cooking until the cheese melts, the fried ones are prepared like a pastry, preparing the uncooked masa in small circles, then topping with the filling and finally folding the quesadilla to form the pastry. It is then immersed into hot oil until the exterior looks golden and crispy.

Other variations include the use of wheat flour tortillas instead, especially in northeastern Mexico. Wheat dough is most commonly used in place of corn masa. In this case, the flour tortilla is prepared, folded and filled with cheese, exactly as the corn.

Sometimes cheese and ham are sandwiched between two flour tortillas, then cut into wedges to serve what is commonly known as sincronizada (Spanish for “synchronized”) in Mexico. Despite appearing almost the same as a quesadilla, it is considered a completely different dish. The sincronizada is frequently confused with quesadillas by tourists, because it is typically called a quesadilla in most Mexican restaurants outside of México.

 

Quesadillas served at a Friendly's

Quesadillas served at a Friendly’s

U.S. quesadilla

The quesadilla is a regional favorite in the Southwest United States where it is analogous to a ‘grilled cheese sandwich’. It is prepared in a similar manner except for the inclusion of local ingredients, and sometimes turkey. A flour tortilla is heated on a griddle, then flipped and sprinkled with a grated, melting cheese (queso quesadilla), such as Monterey Jack, Cheddar cheese or Colby Jack. Once the cheese melts, other ingredients; such as shredded meat, peppers, onions or guacamole may be added, and it is then folded and served.

Another preparation involves cheese and other ingredients sandwiched between two flour tortillas, with the whole package grilled on an oiled griddle and flipped so both sides are cooked and the cheese is melted. This version is often cut into wedges to serve. A home appliance (quesadilla maker) is sold to produce this kind of quesadilla, although it does not use oil and cooks both sides at once. This type is similar to the Mexican sincronizada; but in the United States, they often also have fajita beef or chicken or other ingredients instead of ham. That kind of quesadilla is also Mexican, and it is called “gringa” (the name varies in some regions in Mexico, there’s also a type of quesadilla called “chavindeca”).

There is a lot of regional variation to specific recipes throughout the Southwest.

 
Quesadillas have been adapted to many different styles. In the United States, many restaurants serve them as appetizers, after adding their own twist. Some variations are: goat cheese, black beans, spinach, zucchini, or tofu. A Scandinavian treat uses a lefse (thin potato pancake resembling a tortilla) containing brie cheese and lingonberry jam. Even dessert quesadillas are made, using ingredients such as chocolate, butterscotch, caramel, and different fruits.

 

Low-Carb Mexican Recipes

April 26, 2015 at 5:37 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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Enjoy the Mexican Cuisine without all the carbs, Low-Carb Mexican Recipes. From the Diabetic Living On Line website. http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Low-Carb Mexican Recipes
¡Delicioso! Turn to these diabetes-friendly recipes when you’re craving Mexican food. Whether you’re looking for authentic Mexican recipes or Tex-Mex food, we’ve got skinny salsas, veggie-packed taco recipes, and easy low-carb casseroles that are sure to impress.

 

 

Grilled Lime Chicken with Watermelon Salsa

Juicy watermelon salsa makes a refreshing topper for this Mexican chicken recipe. With just 9 grams of carb per serving, the lime-brushed chicken breasts are a go-to diabetic dish for the grill…..

 

 

Seafood Enchiladas

This gorgeous dish combines the Mexican flavors you love with the convenience of a casserole. We stuffed tortillas with a mixture of fish, shrimp, peppers, and creamy sauce for a low-carb seafood dinner that feeds eight…..

 

 

Huevos Rancheros Tacos

Scrambled eggs take the place of meat in these protein-packed vegetarian Mexican tacos. And at 31 grams of carb per serving, they’re a healthy choice for breakfast, lunch, or dinner….

 
* Click the link below to get all the Low-Carb Mexican Recipes

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/mexican/low-carb-mexican-recipes

Easy Mexican Food Favorites

February 20, 2015 at 6:13 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website it’s Easy Mexican Food Favorites. http://www.eatingwell.com/
Easy Mexican Food Favorites

 

 

EatingWell2

Crispy Turkey Tostadas
Shredded leftover turkey tops homemade tostadas in this Tex-Mex favorite. Making your own tostada shells from fresh corn tortillas is easier than you might think—crisp them up in the oven while you prepare the toppings. Choose either regular petite diced tomatoes or those with added jalapeños, depending on your inclination for spicy food. Serve with black beans, rice and extra salsa or hot sauce on the side…..

 

Mini Chile Relleno Casseroles
Everyone gets an individual portion with this vegetarian, Tex-Mex mini casserole. A normal-size casserole like this would take close to an hour to bake—these are ready in half the time. Heatproof ramekins are a cook’s best friend—we use them all the time to hold ingredients while cooking. You can buy them at most grocery stores……

 
* Click the link below to see all the Easy Mexican Food Favorites

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/easy_mexican_food_favorites?sssdmh=dm17.785652&slide=4&utm_source=EWTWNL&esrc=nwewtw021715

One of America’s Favorites – Salsa

June 3, 2013 at 7:25 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Salsa is the Spanish term for sauce, and in English-speaking countries usually refers to the often tomato-based, hot sauces typical of SalsaMexican cuisine, particularly those used as dips. There are many types of salsa which usually vary throughout Latin America.

 

The word salsa entered the English language from the Spanish salsa (“sauce”), which itself derives from the Latin salsa (“salty”), from sal (“salt”). The proper Spanish pronunciation is [ˈsalsa]; however, most American English speakers pronounce it /ˈsɑːlsə/. In British and Canadian English it is pronounced /ˈsælsə/. In Australian English it is pronounced soul-saa.

 

Mexican salsas were traditionally produced using the mortar and pestle-like molcajete, although blenders are now more commonly used. The Mayans made salsa also, using a mortar and pestle. Well-known salsas include:
* Salsa roja, “red sauce”, is used as a condiment in Mexican and Southwestern (U.S.) cuisines; usually includes cooked tomatoes, chili peppers, onion, garlic, and fresh cilantro.
* Pico de gallo (“rooster’s beak”), also known as salsa fresca (“fresh sauce“), salsa picada (“chopped sauce”), or salsa mexicana (“Mexican sauce”), is made with raw tomatoes, lime juice, chili peppers, onions, cilantro leaves, and other coarsely chopped raw ingredients.
* Salsa cruda is an uncooked mixture of chopped tomatoes, onions, jalapeño peppers, and cilantro, or coriander leaf.
* Salsa verde, “green sauce”, in Mexican versions, is made with tomatillos, usually cooked. The Italian version is made with herbs.
* Salsa negra, “black sauce” is a Mexican sauce made from dried chilis, oil, and garlic.
*Salsa taquera, “taco sauce”: Made with tomatillos and morita chili
* Salsa criolla is a South American salsa with a sliced-onion base.
* Salsa ranchera, “ranch-style sauce”: Made with roasted tomatoes, various chilies, and spices, it typically is served warm, and possesses a thick, soupy quality. Though it contains none, it imparts a characteristic flavor reminiscent of black pepper.
* Salsa brava, “wild sauce”, is a mildly spicy sauce made with tomato, garlic, onion, and vinegar, often flavored with paprika. On top of potato wedges, it makes the dish patatas bravas, typical of tapas bars in Spain.
* Guacamole is thicker than a sauce and generally used as a dip; it refers to any sauce where the main ingredient is avocado.
* Mole (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈmole]) is a Mexican sauce made from chili peppers mixed with spices, unsweetened chocolate, almonds, and other ingredients.
* Mango salsa is a spicy-sweet sauce made from mangoes, used as a topping for nachos. It is often also used as a garnish on grilled chicken or grilled fish due to the sauce’s gamut of complementary flavors.
* Pineapple salsa is a spicy and sweet sauce made from pineapples, used as an alternative to the mango salsa.
* Chipotle salsa is a smoky, spicy sauce made from smoked jalapeño chili peppers, tomatoes, garlic and spices.
* Habanero salsa is an extremely spicy salsa, where the piquancy comes from habanero peppers.
* Corn salsa is a chunky salsa made with sweetcorn and other ingredients, such as onions, and chiles (either poblano, bell peppers, and/or jalapenos), made popular by the burrito chains for burritos, tacos, and quesadillas.
* Carrot salsa is made with carrots as the base.

 

There are many other salsas, both traditional and nouveau, some are made with mint, pineapple, or mango.
Outside of Mexico and Central America, the following salsas are common to each of the following regions; in Argentina and the Southern Cone, chimichurri sauce is common. Chimichurri is “a spicy vinegar-parsley sauce that is the salsa (and leading condiment) in Argentina and Uruguay, served with grilled meat. It is made of chopped fresh parsley and onion, seasoned with garlic, oregano, salt, cayenne and black pepper and bound with oil and vinegar.” In Costa Rica, dishes are prepared with salsa Lizano, a thin, smooth, light brown sauce. In Cuba and the Caribbean, a typical salsa is mojo. Unlike the tomato-based salsas, mojo typically consists of olive oil, garlic, and citrus juice, and is used both to marinate meats and as a dipping sauce. In Peru, a traditional salsa is peri peri or piri piri sauce: “The national condiment of Peru, peri-peri sauce is made in medium to hot levels of spiciness—the more chile, or the hotter variety of chile used, the hotter the sauce. Original peri-peri uses the African bird’s eye chile (the African word for the chile is peri-peri). Milder sauces may use only cayenne and serrano chiles. To a base of vinegar and oil, garlic and lemon juice are added, plus other seasonings, which often include paprika or tomato paste for flavor and color, onions and herb—each company has its own recipe. It is also used as a cooking sauce.*

 

Most jarred, canned, and bottled salsa and picante sauces sold in the United States in grocery stores are forms of salsa cruda or pico de

Commercially prepared American salsa

Commercially prepared American salsa

gallo, and typically have a semi-liquid texture. To increase their shelf lives, these salsas have been cooked to a temperature of 175 °F (79 °C). Some have added vinegar, and some use pickled peppers instead of fresh ones. Tomatoes are strongly acidic by nature, which, along with the heat processing, is enough to stabilize the product for grocery distribution.
Picante sauce of the American type is often thinner in consistency than what is labelled as “salsa”. Picante is a Spanish adjective meaning “piquant”, which derives from picar (“to sting”), referring to the feeling caused by salsas on one’s tongue.
Many grocery stores in the United States and Canada also sell “fresh” refrigerated salsa, usually in plastic containers. Fresh salsa is usually more expensive and has a shorter shelf life than canned or jarred salsa. It may or may not contain vinegar.
Taco sauce is a condiment sold in American grocery stores and fast food Tex-Mex outlets. Taco sauce is similar to its Mexican counterpart in that it is smoothly blended, having the consistency of thin ketchup. It is made from tomato paste instead of whole tomatoes and lacks the seeds and chunks of vegetables found in picante sauce.
While some salsa fans do not consider jarred products to be real salsa cruda, their widespread availability and long shelf life have been credited with much of salsa’s enormous popularity in states outside of the southwest, especially in areas where salsa is not a traditional part of the cuisine. In 1992, the dollar total of salsa sales in the United States exceeded those of tomato ketchup.

Buffalo 3 Bean Chili Tortilla

April 3, 2013 at 11:26 AM | Posted in bison, chili, Kraft Cheese, tortilllas | 1 Comment
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Buffalo Chili Tortilla 001

At Kroger early this morning I came across a new Tortilla, Ole Mexican Foods Low Carb Tortilla Wraps. When I seen those I had an idea right away for my lunch, 3 Bean Buffalo Chili and Cheese Tortilla! I used the Low Carb Tortlla, 3 Bean Buffalo Chili, and Kraft 2% Shredded Sharp Cheddar. Delicious and Light Lunch!

 

 

 

 

 

 
Ole Mexican Foods Low Carb Tortilla WrapsOLE_XtemeWellness_HighFiberLowCarb
Delivers all the advantages of high-fiber foods.

INGREDIENTS
Whole wheat flour, Enriched bleached flour (Wheat flour, Malted barley flour, Niacin, Reduced iron, Thiamine mononitrate, Riboflavin and Folic acid), Water, Cellulose fiber, Wheat gluten, Extra virgin olive oil; Contains 2% or less of the following: Xantham gum, Guar gum, Salt, Mono and diglycerides, Baking powder (Sodium acid pyrophosphate, Monocalcium phosphate, Baking soda), Calcium propionate, Sorbic acid (Mold inhibitor), Fumaric acid, Carboxymethyl cellulose, Sugar, Dough relaxer (Sodium metabisulfite, Corn starch, Microcrystalline cellulose, Dicalcium phosphate), Enzymes.

Contains: Wheat.
Nutrition Facts
Ole Mexican Foods Extreme Wellness – High Fiber, Low Carb Tortillas Wraps
Servings:
Calories 90 Sodium 350 mg
Total Fat 0 g Potassium 0 mg
Saturated 0 g Total Carbs 14 g
Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 9 g
Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 0 g
Trans 0 g Protein 5 g
Cholesterol 0 mg

 
http://www.olemexicanfoods.com/high-fiberlow-carb-8-wraps/

Potatoes Goodness Unearthed

July 11, 2012 at 9:52 AM | Posted in Food, potatoes | Leave a comment
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If you like potatoes as much as I do you’ll love this web site, http://www.potatogoodness.com/index.php This site has it all recipes, nutrition info, and just about everything you would want to know about the “Spud” Check it out and you can subscribe to their newsletter. I left recipe below from the web site recipe collection below along with web site link.

Quick & Healthy Chile Lime Potato Tacos

Recipe By: US Potato Board
Servings: 4 Ready Time: 25 min
Prep Time: 5 min
Cook Time: 20 min
About Recipe:
This recipe is great for people who crave Mexican food but strive to consume fewer calories. The chili and lime flavors make this recipe so tasty and with all variations under 250 calories and 7 grams of fat per serving, this is a perfect recipe to include in a low-calorie diet. Adding potatoes to your taco increases the potassium and vitamin c, without adding fat or cholesterol.
Ingredients
1/2 pound Yukon Gold or red potatoes, cut into bite-size cubes
Olive oil cooking spray
1/2 cup chopped onion
1/2 pound diced boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1/2 cup red chili enchilada sauce
1/4 cup finely chopped poblano, Anaheim or bell pepper
1 teaspoon Mexican seasoning blend
1/2 cup shredded reduced-fat Monterey Jack cheese
8 small corn tortillas*, warmed or crunchy taco shells
Shredded cabbage or romaine lettuce, diced tomato, diced avocado, thinly sliced radishes, fresh cilantro leaves and salsa (optional toppers)
8 lime wedges
Directions
Place potatoes in a microwave-safe bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Microwave on HIGH for 5 to 7 minutes. Spray a large skillet liberally with cooking spray. Add potatoes and onion; cook over medium-high heat for 5 minutes, stirring and coating with cooking spray occasionally. Stir in chicken, pepper and seasoning and cook for 5 minutes more. Add red chili enchilada sauce and simmer for 5 minutes. Place equal amounts of cheese on each tortillas and heat in a skillet until cheese is melted. Add potato mixture and any other desired toppings. Serve with lime wedge.
Nutrition
Cal: 220 Chol: 40mg Sodium: 200mg
Fat: 5g Vitamin C 25% Potassium: 415mg
Carb: 25 Fiber: 2g Protein: 19g

http://www.potatogoodness.com/index.php

One of America’s Favorites – Tacos

May 30, 2012 at 9:19 AM | Posted in tacos | 4 Comments
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Carnitas tacos as served in East Los Angeles, California, United States.

A taco is a traditional Mexican dish composed of a corn or wheat tortilla folded or rolled around a filling. A taco can be made with a

variety of fillings, including beef, chicken, seafood, vegetables and cheese, allowing for great versatility and variety. A taco is generally eaten without utensils and is often accompanied by garnishes such as salsa, avocado or guacamole, cilantro, tomatoes, minced meat, onions and lettuce.

According to the Real Academia Española, publisher of Diccionario de la Lengua Española, the word taco describes a typical Mexican dish of a maize tortilla folded around food (“Tortilla de maíz enrollada con algún alimento dentro, típica de México“). The original sense of the word is of a “plug” or “wad” used to fill a hole (“Pedazo de madera, metal u otra materia, corto y grueso, que se encaja en algún hueco”). The Online Etymological Dictionary defines taco as a “tortilla filled with spiced meat” and describes its etymology as derived from Mexican Spanish, “light lunch,” literally, “plug, wadding.” The sense development from “plug” may have taken place among Mexican silver miners, who used explosive charges in plug form consisting of a paper wrapper and gunpowder filling.

*Tacos de Asador (“spit” or “grill” tacos) may be composed of any of the following: carne asada tacos; tacos de tripita (“tripe tacos”), grilled until crisp; and, chorizo asado (traditional Spanish style sausage). Each type is served on two overlapped small tortillas and sometimes garnished with guacamole, salsa, onions, and cilantro. Also prepared on the grill is a sandwiched taco called mulita (“little mule”) made with meat served between two tortillas and garnished with Oaxaca style cheese. “Mulita” is used to describe these types of sandwiched tacos in the Northern States of Mexico, while they are known as Gringa in the Mexican south and are prepared using wheat flour tortillas. Tacos may also be served with salsa.
*Tacos de Cabeza or head tacos, in which there is a flat punctured metal plate from which steam emerges to cook the head of the cow. These include: Cabeza, a serving of the muscles of the head; Sesos (“brains”); Lengua (“tongue”); Cachete (“cheeks”); Trompa (“lips”); and, Ojo (“eye”). Tortillas for these tacos are warmed on the same steaming plate for a different consistency. These tacos are typically served in pairs, and also include salsa, onion and cilantro with occasional use of guacamole.
*Tacos de Cazo for which a metal bowl filled with lard is typically used as a deep-fryer. Meats for these types of tacos typically include: Tripa (“tripe”, usually from a pig instead of a cow); Suadero (tender beef cuts), Carnitas and Buche (Literally, “crop”, as in bird’s crop; here, it is fried pig’s esophagus.

*Tacos sudados (“sweaty tacos”) are made by filling soft tortillas with a spicy meat mixture, then placing them in a basket covered with cloth. The covering keeps the tacos warm and traps steam (“sweat”) which softens them.

*Tacos Al pastor/De Adobada (“shepherd style”) are made of thin pork steaks seasoned with adobo seasoning, then skewered and overlapped on one another on a vertical rotisserie cooked and flame-broiled as it spins (analogous to the Döner kebab used in Greek restaurants to prepare gyros).
*Tacos dorados (fried tacos, literally, “golden tacos”) called flautas (“flute”, because of the shape), or taquitos, for which the tortillas are filled with pre-cooked shredded chicken, beef or barbacoa, rolled into an elongated cylinder and deep-fried until crisp. They are sometimes cooked in a microwave oven or broiled.
*Tacos de pescado (“fish tacos”) originated in Baja California in Mexico, where they consist of grilled or fried fish, lettuce or cabbage, pico de gallo, and a sour cream or citrus/mayonnaise sauce, all placed on top of a corn or flour tortilla. In the United States, they remain most popular in California, Colorado, and Washington. In California, they are often found at street vendors, and a regional variation is to serve them with cabbage and coleslaw dressing on top.

Grilled shrimp taco.

*Tacos de camarones (“shrimp tacos”) also originated in Baja California in Mexico. Grilled or fried shrimp are used, usually with the

same accompaniments as fish tacos: lettuce or cabbage, pico de gallo, avocado and a sour cream or citrus/mayonnaise sauce, all placed on top of a corn or flour tortilla.

As an accompaniment to tacos, many taco stands will serve whole or sliced red radishes, lime slices, salt, pickled or grilled chilis (hot peppers), and occasionally cucumber slices, or grilled cambray onions.

*Hard-shell tacos

Beginning from the early part of the twentieth century, various styles of tacos have become popular in the United States and Canada.

Hard-shell taco

The style that has become most common is the hard-shell, U-shaped version first described in a cookbook, The good life: New Mexican food, authored by Fabiola Cabeza de Vaca Gilbert and published in Santa Fe, New Mexico in 1949. These have been sold by restaurants and by fast food chains. Even non-Mexican oriented fast food restaurants have sold tacos. Mass production of this type of taco was encouraged by the invention of devices to hold the tortillas in the U-shape as they were deep-fried. A patent for such a device was issued to New York restaurateur Juvenico Maldonado in 1950, based on his patent filing of 1947 (U.S. Patent No. 2,506,305). Such tacos are crisp-fried corn tortillas filled with seasoned ground beef, cheese, lettuce, and sometimes tomato, onion, salsa, sour cream, and avocado or guacamole.
*Soft-shell tacos

Traditionally, soft-shelled tacos referred to corn tortillas that were cooked to a softer state than a hard taco – usually by grilling or steaming. More recently the term has come to include flour tortilla based tacos mostly from large manufacturers and restaurant chains. In this context, soft tacos are tacos made with wheat flour tortillas and filled with the same ingredients as a hard taco.

*Puffy tacos, taco kits, breakfast tacos and tacodillas

Since at least 1978, a variation called the “puffy taco” has been popular. Henry’s Puffy Tacos, opened by Henry Lopez in San Antonio, Texas, claims to have invented the variation, in which uncooked corn tortillas (flattened balls of masa dough[17]) are quickly fried in hot oil until they expand and become “puffy”. Fillings are similar to hard-shell versions. Restaurants offering this style of taco have since appeared in other Texas cities, as well as in California, where Henry’s brother, Arturo Lopez, opened Arturo’s Puffy Taco in Whittier, not long after Henry’s opened. Henry’s continues to thrive, managed by the family’s second generation.

Kits are available at grocery and convenience stores and usually consist of taco shells (corn tortillas already fried in a U-shape), seasoning mix and taco sauce. Commercial vendors for the home market also market soft taco kits with tortillas instead of taco shells.

The breakfast taco, found in Tex-Mex cuisine, is filled with meat, eggs, or cheese, with other ingredients.

The tacodilla contains melted cheese in between the two folded tortillas, thus resembling a quesadilla.

*Indian tacos

Frybread taco

Indian tacos, sometimes known as Navajo tacos but served in various parts of the American West and Midwest, are made using frybread instead of tortillas. They are commonly served at pow-wows, festivals, and other gatherings.

Turkey Tacos

April 1, 2012 at 5:03 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, ground turkey, Kraft Cheese, low calorie, low carb, tacos | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Turkey Tacos

I wanted something light and healthy and went with Turkey Tacos. I used Jennie – O Extra Lean Ground Turkey, 120 calories and 0 carbs. I browned the Turkey lightly frying in Extra Virgin Olive Oil. After browning added Old El Paso Taco Seasoning and also added a tablespoon of Ground Smoked Cumin and 1 tablespoon Cilantro.

I used Old El Paso Stand Up Taco Shells and for the Taco fillings I used Shredded Lettuce, diced Jalapenos, chopped Black Olives, Kraft 2% Mexican Blend Cheese, and Old El Paso Medium Taco Sauce. Love Tacos especially these Turkey Tacos. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

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