One of America’s Favorites – Meatballs

April 29, 2013 at 8:24 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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A meatball is made from an amount of ground meat rolled into a small ball, sometimes along with other ingredients, such as breadcrumbs, minced onion, spices, possibly eggs and herbs. Meatballs are usually prepared and rolled by hand, and are cooked by frying, baking, steaming, or braising in sauce.
There are many types of meatball recipes using different types of meats and spices, including vegetarian and fish alternatives, and various methods of preparation.
The ancient Roman cookbook Apicius included many meatball-type recipes. From the Balkans to India, there is a large variety of meatballs in the kofta family.

 

 

Meatballs across various cultures

A variety of Chinese meatballs and fishballs

A variety of Chinese meatballs and fishballs

 

*Chinese meatballs (specifically, a dish common in Shanghai cuisine) are most often made of pork and are usually steamed or boiled, either as-is, or with the addition of soy sauce. Large meatballs, called lion’s heads, can range in size from about 5 cm to 10 cm in diameter. Smaller varieties, called pork balls, are used in soups. A Cantonese variant, the steamed meatball, is made of beef and served as a dim sum dish. A similar dish is called the beef ball, and the fish ball is yet another variety made from pulverized fish. In northern China, irregular balls made from minced meat and flour are often deep-fried and eaten for special occasions.

 

*In Italy, meatballs are generally eaten as a main course or in a soup. The main ingredients of an Italian meatball are: beef and or pork and sometimes poultry, salt, black pepper, chopped garlic, olive oil, Romano cheese, eggs, bread crumbs and parsley, mixed and rolled by hand to a golf ball size. In the Abruzzo region of Italy, especially in the Province of Teramo, the meatballs are typically the size of marbles, and are called polpettine.

 

*The Japanese hamburger steak, hanbāgu, is typically made of ground beef, milk-soaked panko (bread crumbs) and minced, sauteed onions. They are typically eaten with a sauce made from ketchup and Worcestershire sauce. Chinese style meatballs are also popular.

 

*In Sweden, köttbullar (meatballs) are made with ground beef or a mix of ground beef, pork and sometimes veal, sometimes including

Meatballs served Swedish style with mashed potatoes, brown sauce, lingonberry jam and pickled cucumber

Meatballs served Swedish style with mashed potatoes, brown sauce, lingonberry jam and pickled cucumber

breadcrumbs soaked in milk, finely chopped (fried) onions, some broth and often including cream. They are seasoned with white pepper or allspice and salt. Swedish meatballs are traditionally served with gravy, boiled potatoes, lingonberry jam, and sometimes fresh pickled cucumber. Traditionally, they are small, measuring one inch in diameter. In the United States, there are a number of variations, based on the assimilation of Swedes in the Midwest.

 

*In Turkey, meatballs are called Köfte and are extremely popular, there are at least 50 different versions. Meatballs in Turkey are usually made with ground lamb or a mix of ground beef and lamb. Most popular ones are İnegöl Köfte, İzmir Köfte, Şiş Köfte, Kadınbudu Köfte and Akçaabat Köftesi.

 

*In the United Kingdom, faggots are a type of spicy pork meatball. A faggot is traditionally made from pig heart, liver and fatty belly meat or bacon minced together, with herbs added for flavouring, and sometimes breadcrumbs.

 

*In the United States, meatballs are commonly served with spaghetti as in spaghetti and meatballs, a dish in Italian American cuisine, assimilated from Italian immigrants coming from southern Italy in the early 19th century. Over time, the dishes in both cultures have drifted apart in similarity. In the southern United States, venison or beef is also often mixed with spices and baked into large meatballs that can be served as an entree. Another variation, called “porcupine meatballs” are basic meatballs often with rice in them.

 

*In Vietnam, meatballs (thịt viên hay mọc, bò viên, cá viên) can be used as an ingredient in phở, hủ tiếu. It is also common to cook meatballs in tomato sauce, and finely chopped spring onion and peppers are added before serving. In bún chả (a specialty Vietnamese rice noodle), meatballs are grilled to be chả and served with bún (rice noodles) and dipping sauce (based on fish sauce seasoned with rice vinegar, sugar, garlic, and chili). Xíu Mại is a pork meatball in a tomato sauce often served with a baguette.

 

 

Kofta is a Middle Eastern and South Asian meatball or dumpling. The word kofta is derived from Persian kūfta: In Persian, کوفتن (kuftan) means “to beat” or “to grind” or meatball. In the simplest form, koftas consist of balls or fingers of minced or ground meat – usually beef or lamb – mixed with spices and/or onions. The vegetarian variety like lauki kofta, shahi aloo kofta, malaai kofta are popular in India.
The meat is often mixed with other ingredients such as rice, bulgur, vegetables, or eggs to form a smooth paste. Koftas are sometimes made with fish or vegetables rather than meat, especially in India. They can be grilled, fried, steamed, poached, baked or marinated, and may be served with a rich spicy sauce. Variations occur in North Africa, the Mediterranean, Central Europe, Asia and India. According to a 2005 study done by a private food company, there were 291 different kinds of kofta in Turkey, where it is very popular. In Arab countries, kufta is usually shaped into cigar-shaped cylinders.
Early recipes (included in some of the earliest known Arabic cookbooks) generally concern seasoned lamb rolled into orange-sized meatballs, and glazed with egg yolk and sometimes saffron. This method was taken to the west and is referred to as gilding, or endoring. Many regional variations exist, notable among them the unusually large Iranian Kufteh Tabrizi, having an average diameter of 20 cm (8 in).
Koftas in South Asian cuisine are normally cooked in a spicy curry and sometimes with whole pre-boiled eggs. Sometimes the eggs are encased in a layer of the spicy kofta meat so that the final product resembles an Indian Scotch egg. These kofta dishes are very popular with South Asian families and are widely available from many Indian restaurants. In West Bengal, India and Bangladesh, koftas are made with prawns, fish, green bananas, cabbage, as well as minced goat meat.

Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs

Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs

The record for World’s Largest Meatball was set several times in 2009. It was first set in Mexico in August weighing 49.4 kg (109 pounds) and then again a month later in Los Angeles when late-night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel helped set the record weight at 90 kg (198.6 pounds). In October 2009, an Italian eatery in Concord, New Hampshire set the new record at 101 kg (222.5 pounds).

Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs

June 28, 2012 at 5:51 PM | Posted in Honeysuckle White Turkey Products, low carb, Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Pasta | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs w/ Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce


Summer time has kicked in here in Ohio! 98 – 100 today with high humidity, miserable outside so I wanted a simple but filling dinner so it was spaghetti and Meatballs tonight. I used Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Whole Wheat Spaghetti along with Honeysuckle White Turkey Meatballs. Topped everything with Shredded Parmesan Cheese and Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce (Roasted Garlic). Along with the great taste of the Pasta Sauce it’s also only 70 Calories and a mere 6 Carbs! I also had Meijer Bakery Harvest Grain Bread. For dessert later a slice of Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread topped with a scoop of Breyer’s Carb Smart vanilla Ice Cream.
Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Nutrition

Here’s something to absorb: One serving of RONZONI HEALTHY HARVEST pasta has over 20% of your daily recommended fiber intake – but did you know that fiber is good for you in more ways than just digestion?

People with diets high in fiber have a lower risk for weight gain, obesity, development of insulin resistance and diabetes. Fiber also prevents constipation, hemorrhoids and diverticulosis, but it also helps reduce the risk of certain chronic diseases like colon and breast cancer. Fiber may help lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and total cholesterol, therefore reducing the risk of heart disease. It can also help lower blood sugar to better manage diabetes.

Dietary fiber is the edible part of plants, primarily carbohydrates that are resistant to digestion and absorption in the small intestine. Fiber may be digested by fermentation in the large intestine. By eating high fiber foods you feel fuller, eat less, with fewer absorbed calories.

Fiber comes in two basic forms – soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber is found in fruits, vegetables, seeds, brown rice, oats and barley. It prevents or reduces the absorption of certain substances into the bloodstream. Insoluble fiber is found mainly in whole grains and on the outside of seeds, fruits, legumes, and other foods. It is like a sponge that swells within the intestine to promote more efficient elimination and alleviate some digestive disorders.

Fiber is found only in plant foods and passes through the digestive tract without being completely broken down. Being indigestible, fiber provides no nutrients to the body, which is why for many years it was removed from processed foods like white bread. But, nutritionists have since discovered that fiber performs valuable functions precisely because it is not digested, and it is essential to good health.

The 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends everyone consume 14 g of fiber for every 1000 calories. Ronzoni Healthy Harvest is an excellent source of fiber, with 5-6 grams of fiber in every 2 oz. serving. Fiber is an integral part of your everyday diet, and RONZONI HEALTHY HARVEST pasta, as an excellent source, is a perfect solution to get more of it onto your family’s plate!
Whole Grain Spaghetti

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 2oz (56g) Dry Uncooked
Servings per Container: About 7

Amount Per Serving

Calories 180 Calories from Fat 10

% Daily Value*

Total Fat 1g 2%

Saturated Fat 0g 0%

Trans Fat 0g

Cholesterol 0mg 0%

Sodium 0mg 0%

Total Carbohydrates 41g 14%

Dietary Fiber 6g 23%

Sugars <1g

Protein 7g

http://ronzonihealthyharvest.newworldpasta.com/pasta_nutrition.cfm?prodId=003340006502

Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs

May 12, 2012 at 5:33 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Honeysuckle White Turkey Products, Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Pasta, Turkey meatballs | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs w/ Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce

It was spaghetti and Meatballs tonight. I used Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Whole Wheat Spaghetti along with Honeysuckle White Turkey Meatballs. Topped everything with Shredded Parmesan Cheese and Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce (Roasted Meat Flavored). Along with the great taste of the Pasta Sauce it’s also only 70 Calories and a mere 6 Carbs! I also had Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. For dessert a Yoplait Banana/Chocolate Smoothie.

Tofu Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs

April 15, 2012 at 5:21 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Honeysuckle White Turkey Products, low calorie, low carb, tofu, Turkey meatballs | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Tofu Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs

Tofu Spaghetti! Years ago I would have said “No Way” but now as I’m older and trying to eat more healthy this is great! I used House Food Tofu Shirataki Spaghetti Shaped Tofu. I made Mac & Cheese with Elbow Macaroni shaped Tofu a couple of weeks ago so I wanted to give Spaghetti and Meatballs a try. I heated the Tofu by the instructions, which I left at the bottom of the post along with description and web links.

For my sauce I used my favorite pasta Sauce, Bella Vita Low Carb Meat Flavored Pasta Sauce. If you watching the calories and carbs this sauce is the Bomb! Comes in Roasted Garlic and Meat Flavored and is only 70 calories and 6 carbs! The Meatballs were Honey Suckle White Turkey Meatballs. Love these Meatballs great flavor and they make a delicious Meatball Sub! They are 190 calories and 6 carbs per serving (3 Meatballs). I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Italian Seasoning and topped everything with a sprinkle of Kraft Shredded Parm and Kraft 2% Shredded Sharp Cheddar. The nice part about this dinner, besides being delicious, is you can have a second helping and still have a low calorie and carb dinner. The one bag of Tofu makes more than enough for two people. For dessert/snack later a 100 Calorie Bag of Jolly Time Mini Bag of Pop Corn.

House Tofu Shirataki.
Tofu Shirataki is a great pasta alternative made from blending the root of the Konnyaku – a member of the yam family and tofu.
It is a healthy, uniquely textured noodle – that pleases people of all ages!

VARIETY OF SHAPES:
Macaroni New!
Spaghetti
Fettuccine
Angel-Hair

*The Macaroni shape is available in only selected retailers.

LOW CARB – only 3g of carbs per serving
LOW CALORIE – 20 calories per 4 oz serving
FIBER – 2g per serving
NO CHOLESTEROL
NO SUGAR
GLUTEN-FREE, DAIRY-FREE
CONTAINS 10% CALCIUM
VEGAN
KOSHER CERTIFIED

*TOFU SHIRATAKI CANNOT BE FROZEN

Directions:
Step 1: Empty your noodles into a strainer, and rinse them with water to get rid of the liquid they were packed in.

Step 2: Dry them as thoroughly as possible by blotting with paper towels — remove as much moisture as possible. We cannot stress enough how important this is.

Step 3: Cut them up a bit; they can be VERY long. (Fun fact: We once found a noodle that was six feet long!) Kitchen shears (scissors you use only for food) make this super-easy.

Step 4: Heat your noodles for a minute or two in the microwave or in a skillet on the stove. (If microwaving, you may want to blot for liquid one more time before adding sauce.)

http://www.house-foods.com/Tofu/tofu_shirataki.aspx

http://www.hungry-girl.com/biteout/show/2157

Turkey Meatball Mini Sub

February 9, 2012 at 6:53 PM | Posted in diabetes friendly, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Honeysuckle White Turkey Products, low calorie, low carb, Turkey meatballs | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Turkey Meatball Mimi Sub Sandwich

Well I started out on having Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs but by the time it was dinner I just wasn’t that hungry but I had already made my Turkey Meatballs and Sauce. So I went ahead and used three of the Meatballs along with 1 1/2 tablespoons of the Sauce and put them on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Hot Dog Bun, and I had my Mini Sub! I used Honeysuckle White Turkey Meatballs, I think the best tasting pre-made Meatballs there are, Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce, fresh grated Smoked Dutch Gouda Cheese, and Healthy Life Whole Grain Buns for my ingredients. Lite, Healthy, and delicious! I could have used a 2% Mozzarella Cheese but I just can’t pass up a chance to use that Gouda! No sides needed with this. For dessert later a bowl of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream topped with Del Monte No Sugar Added Sliced Peaches.

Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs

October 7, 2011 at 5:39 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Honeysuckle White Turkey Products, low calorie, low carb, spaghetti | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs w/ Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce and…

It was spaghetti and Meatballs tonight! I used Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Whole Wheat Spaghetti along with Honeysuckle White Turkey Meatballs. Topped everything with Shredded Parmesan Cheese and Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce (Roasted Garlic Flavored). Along with the great taste the Sauce is only 70 Calories and a mere 6 Carbs! I also had Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. For dessert/snack later some Chip‘ins Popcorn Chips along with Fiesta Salsa.

National Dish of the Week – Sweden

September 29, 2011 at 1:17 PM | Posted in baking, Food, grilling | Leave a comment
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Due to Sweden’s large north-south extent there have always been regional differences in Swedish cuisine. Historically, in the far North, meats such as reindeer, and other (semi-) game dishes were eaten, some of which have their roots in the Sami culture, while fresh vegetables have played a larger role in the South. Many traditional dishes employ simple, contrasting flavors; such as the

Swedish meatballs with cream sauce, mashed potatoes

traditional dish of hearty meatballs and gravy with tart, pungent lingonberry jam (slightly similar in taste to cranberry sauce).

Swedes have traditionally been very open to foreign influences, ranging from French cuisine during the 17th and 18th century, to the sushi and cafe latte of today. On the fast food side, pizza and hot-dogs have been a ubiquitous part of Swedish culture since the 1960s. Twenty years later, the same could be said about the growing popularity of the kebab and falafel, as many small restaurants specialise in such dishes.

Swedish cuisine could be described as centered around cultured dairy products, crisp and soft (often sugared) breads, berries and stone fruits, beef, pork, sweetened seafood and fish. Potatoes are often served as a side dish, often boiled. Swedish cuisine has a huge variety of breads of different shapes and sizes, made of rye, wheat, oat, white, dark, sour-dough, whole grain; soft flat breads and crispbreads. There are many sweetened bread types and some use spices. Many meat dishes and especially meatballs are served with lingonberry jam. Fruit soups with high viscosity, like rose hip soup and blueberry soup (blåbärssoppa) served hot or cold, are typical of Swedish cuisine. Butter and margarine are the primary fat sources, although olive oil is becoming more popular. Sweden’s pastry tradition features a variety of yeast buns, cookies, biscuits and cakes, many of them in a sugary style with a pastry (fika) are enormously popular in Sweden.

The importance of fish has governed Swedish population and trade patterns far back in history. For preservation, fish were salted and cured. Salt became a major trade item at the dawn of the Scandinavian middle ages, which began circa 1000 AD. Cabbage preserved as sauerkraut and various kinds of preserved berries, apples, etc. were used once as a source of vitamin C during the winter (today sauerkraut is used very seldom in Swedish cuisine). Lingonberry jam, still a favourite, may be the most traditional and typical Swedish way to add freshness to sometimes rather heavy food, such as steaks and stews.

Sweden’s long winters explain the lack of fresh vegetables in many traditional recipes. In older times, plants that would sustain the population through the winters were cornerstones; various turnips such as the kålrot (aptly named “swede” in British English) were gradually supplanted or complemented by the potato in the 18th century. Before the influences of French cuisine during the 17th and 18th centuries, a lack of distinct spices made every-day food rather plain by today’s standards, although a number of local herbs and plants have been used since ancient times. This tradition is still present in today’s Swedish dishes, which are still rather sparingly spiced.

Both before and after this period, some new Germanic dishes were also brought in by immigrants, such as persons related to the Hanseatic League, settling in Stockholm, Visby, and Kalmar. Swedish traders and aristocrats naturally also picked up some food traditions in foreign countries; cabbage rolls (kåldolmar) being one example. Cabbage rolls were introduced in Sweden by Karl XII who came in contact with this dish at the time of the Battle of Poltava and during his camp in the Turkish Bender and later introduced by his Ottoman creditors, which moved to Stockholm in 1716. Kåldolmar were already described in 1755, by Cajsa Warg, in her famous Hjelpreda i hushållningen för unga fruentimber.

Swedish husmanskost denotes traditional Swedish dishes with local ingredients, the classical every-day Swedish cuisine. The word husmanskost stems from husman, meaning “house owner” (without associated land), and the term was originally used for most kinds of simple countryside food outside of towns. Genuine Swedish husmanskost used predominantly local ingredients such as pork in all forms, fish, cereals, milk, potato, root vegetables, cabbage, onions, apples, berries etc.; beef and lamb were used more sparingly. Beside berries, apples are the most used traditional fruit, eaten fresh or served as apple pie, apple sauce, or apple cake. Time consuming cooking methods such as redningar (roux) and långkok (literally “long boil”) are commonly employed and spices are sparingly used. Examples of Swedish husmanskost are pea soup (ärtsoppa), boiled and mashed carrots, potato and rutabaga served with pork (rotmos med fläsk), many varieties of salmon (such as gravlax, inkokt lax, fried, pickled), varieties of herring (most commonly pickled, but also fried, au grautain, etc.), fishballs (fiskbullar), meatballs (köttbullar), potato dumplings with meat or other ingredients (palt), potato pancake (raggmunk), varieties of porridge (gröt), a fried mix of pieces of potato, different kind of meats, sausages, bacon and onion (pytt i panna), meat stew with onion (kalops), and potato dumplings with a filling of onions and pork (kroppkakor).

Dishes akin to Swedish husmanskost and food traditions are found also in other Scandinavian countries; details may vary. Sweden is part of the vodka belt and historically distilled beverages, such as brännvin and snaps, have been a traditional daily complement to food. Consumption of wine in Sweden has increased during the last fifty years, partly at the expense of beer and stronger alcoholic beverages. In many countries locally produced wines are combined with local husmanskost.

Husmanskost has undergone a renaissance during the last decades as well known (or famous) Swedish chefs, such as Tore Wretman, have presented modernised variants of classical Swedish dishes. In this nouvel husman the amount of fat (which was needed to sustain hard manual labour in the old days) is reduced and some new ingredients are introduced. The cooking methods are tinkered with as well, in order to speed up the cooking process and/or enhance the nutritional value or flavor of the dishes.

Swedes have adopted some foreign influences, ranging from cabbage rolls and influences from French cuisine during the 17th and 18th centuries, to the pizza and cafe latte of today. Many Swedish restaurateurs mix traditional husmanskost with a modern, gourmet approach.

On the fast food side, hot dog sausage served in a bun or wrapped in flatbread is the classical Swedish fast food, but pizza has also been an integral part of Swedish fast food since the 1960s. Twenty years later, the same could be said about kebab and falafel, as many small restaurants specialise in such dishes.

Swedish pancakes

Swedish traditional dishes, some of which are many hundreds of years old, others perhaps a century or less, are still a very important part of Swedish everyday meals, in spite of the fact that modern day Swedish cuisine adopts many international dishes.

Internationally, the most renowned Swedish culinary tradition is the smörgåsbord and, at Christmas, the julbord, including well known Swedish dishes such as gravlax and meatballs.

In Sweden, traditionally, Thursday has been soup day because the maids had half the day off and soup was easy to prepare in advance. One of the most traditional Swedish soups, still served in many restaurants and households every Thursday together with pancakes, is the yellow pea soup, or ärtsoppa. It dates back to the old tradition of peas being associated with Thor. This is a simple meal, a very thick soup, basically consisting of boiled yellow peas, a little onion, salt and small pieces of pork. It is often served with mustard and followed by thin pancakes (see pannkakor). The Swedish Army also serve their conscripts pea soup and pancakes every Thursday.

Potatoes are eaten year-round as the main source of carbohydrates, and are a staple in many traditional dishes. Not until the last 50 years have pasta or rice become common on the dinner table.

There are several different kinds of potatoes: the most appreciated is the new potato, a potato which ripens in early summer, and is enjoyed at the traditional mid-summer feast called midsommar. New potatoes at midsommar are served with pickled herring, chives, sour cream, and the first strawberries of the year are traditionally served as dessert.

The most highly regarded mushroom in Sweden is the chanterelle, which is considered a delicacy. The chanterelle is usually served as a side dish together with steaks, or fried with onions and sauce served on an open sandwich. Second to the chanterelle, and considered almost as delicious, is the porcini mushroom, or karljohansvamp named after Charles XIV John (Karl XIV Johan) who introduced its use as food.

In August, at the traditional feast known as crayfish party, kräftskiva, Swedes eat large amounts of boiled crayfish boiled and then marinated in a broth with salt, a little bit of sugar, and a large amount of dill.

Fruit soups, especially rose hip soup and bilberry soup, are eaten or drunk, usually warm during the winter.

The most important of stronger beverages in the Swedish cuisine is Brännvin which is a general term that includes mainly two kinds of beverages: The Akvavit, also called Aqua vitae, and the Vodka. When consumed traditionally it is often served as a Snaps, but Vodka is also populary consumed as a drink ingredient. Renat is often considered to be the national vodka of Sweden, but other highly popular brands are Explorer Vodka and Absolut Vodka, the latter being one of the world’s best known liquor brands. Most forms of Brännvin have around 40% alcohol.

The production of hard liquor has a tradition dating back to the 18th century and was at a high in the 1840s. Since the 1880s, the state-owned Systembolaget has a monopoly on selling spirits with more than 3.5% alcohol, limiting access. Hembränt (moonshine) used to be made in rural Sweden, but production has lessened in recent years due to more liberal rules for the import of alcohol as well as increased smuggling.

Brödinstitutet (The Bread Institute) once campaigned with a quotation from the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, recommending eating 6 to 8 slices of bread daily. Drinking milk has also been recommended and campaigned for by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare; it’s often recommended to drink two to three glasses of milk per day. 52% of Swedes surveyed drink milk at least once a day, usually one glass with lunch and another glass or two in the evening or morning.

Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs

September 2, 2011 at 5:47 PM | Posted in cheese, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Honeysuckle White Turkey Products, low calorie, low carb, snacks, Turkey meatballs, Whole Grain Bread | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Spaghetti and Turkey Meatballs w/ Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce

It was spaghetti night tonight! I used Ronzoni Healthy Harvest Whole Wheat Spaghetti along with Honeysuckle White Turkey Meatballs. Topped everything with Shredded Parmesan Cheese and Bella Vita Low Carb Pasta Sauce (Meat Flavored). Along with the great taste the Sauce is only 70 Calories and a mere 6 Carbs! I also had healthy Life Whole Grain Bread that I buttered and then sprinkled with Shredded Parm Cheese. Then I baked it at 350 degrees for 7 minutes. Makes a good side for any Pasta dish. For dessert/snack later some Chip‘ins Popcorn Chips along with Athenos Roasted Red Pepper Huummus.

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