One of America’s Favorites – Maytag Blue Cheese

July 13, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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* This is my favorite Blue Cheese, just incredible flavor!

Maytag Blue Cheese

Maytag is a blue cheese produced on the Maytag Dairy Farms outside of Newton, Iowa, the former home of the Maytag Corporation. In 1938, Iowa State University independently developed a process for making blue cheese from homogenized cow’s milk instead of the traditional sheep’s milk.

In 1941 production of the cheese was started by Frederick L. Maytag II and Robert Maytag, grandsons of the founder of the Maytag appliance company, Frederick Louis Maytag I. The milk for the cheese initially came from a prize-winning herd of Holstein cattle that was established by E. H. Maytag, a son of the Maytag founder. As of 2016 the company was owned by the third and fourth generations of the Maytag family. The farm has survived without advertising or a sales staff.

The process for making Maytag Blue Cheese was discovered and patented in the United States by two Iowa State University microbiologists, Clarence Lane and Bernard W. Hammer. Roquefort, another type of blue cheese, had been made for hundreds of years in Europe, but attempts to manufacture a similar cheese in the United States had thus far been unsuccessful. Difficulties encountered in making these types of cheeses produced a less than satisfactory product, and quality control would have been disastrous.

“During the Second World War, the university patented the homogenisation of cheese milk and attempted to have charges levied on Danish cheese produced using homogenised milk. Their attempts failed, as it could be proved that this method had been introduced 20 years earlier in Denmark by Marius Boe.”

The problems encountered with producing Roquefort type cheeses in the United States for distribution were the lengthy time required to develop the flavor, the mold growth not being uniform, the quality being below average for numerous lots produced, and the color of the curd being too dark.

Maytag Blue Cheese Wheels

The process begins with homogenizing the milk used for the cheese. The cream is separated from the milk, homogenized and then added back into the now skim milk, typically at between 80 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit (27 and 38 °C) and 2000 to 3500 pounds-force per square inch (14 to 24 MPa) of pressure. This would allow for proper fat hydrolysis, which affects the flavor of the cheese.

There is a ripening period prior to adding rennet (a mixture of enzymes that coagulates milk into curds and whey) to the cheese. Typically 3 ounces of rennet are added per 100 pounds of milk, allowing it to set in a temperature range of 85 to 86 °F (30 °C). Better results were achieved using 4 ounces of rennet per 100 pounds of milk and setting in a higher than usual temperature range of 90 to 92 °F (32 to 33 °C).

According to Lane and Hammer’s records, their alterations caused the cheese-making process to speed up from this point forward, with the time spent setting, cutting and dipping nearly cut in half. Also, after dipping the cheese and allowing it to cook in hot whey, the draining time was cut from 20–30 minutes to 3–5 minutes.

Penicillium is then added to the finished product, which produces its characteristic green veins.

After the rounds of cheese are made by hand, the cheese is aged in specially designed caves where they are exposed to high humidity and cool temperatures.

As of 2017 the cheese continued to be made by hand with milk from local dairy farms.

The process produces cheese with more uniform color, flavor, and texture than previous processes, resulting in a consistent product.

* Best Hard Blue cheese at the 2005 World Cheese Awards

 

Bacon and Blue Buffalo Burger w/ Shredded Hash Browns

July 26, 2018 at 5:14 PM | Posted in hash browns, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Simply Potatoes, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Bacon and Blue Buffalo Burger w/ Shredded Hash Browns

 

 

I just had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast. Having a hard time with my allergies here the last 2 or 3 days. So I’m not quite up to par today with a bad headache. But after I had my Tea I went to the local Kroger here up the road for a few items. Then stopped by McDonald’s and picked up Breakfast for Mom. After Lunch I ran the vacuum and dusted. Then took it easy the rest of the afternoon. For Dinner tonight its a Bacon and Blue Buffalo Burger w/ Shredded Hash Browns.

 

 

I’m having another one of the Wild Idea Buffalo – BACON BLUE BURGER. I tried this for the first time a while back and loved them! It comes frozen and there’s 3 – 1/3 lb. Burger Patties. The Premium Ground Buffalo is mixed with Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon, Blue Cheese, and seasoning. I’ll be preparing it as I do all Wild Idea Buffalo Burger. I’m dressing it up a bit this time. To prepare I’ll need; Maytag Crumbled Blue Cheese, 1 slice of Boar’s Head Bacon, Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam, and a toasted Healthy Life Multi Grain English Muffin.

 

 


To start it I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn, lightly seasoned. I then pan fried it, on medium heat, in Extra Light Virgin Olive Oil about 3 1/2 minutes per side. Buffalo gets done rather quickly due to it’s so lean. And as all the Wild Idea Buffalo Burgers it cooked up perfect!

 

 

 

As the Burger was cooking I toasted a Healthy Life Multi Grain English Muffin. By using the Muffin instead of Burger Bun I saved on Calories, Fat, and carbs. I also microwaved a slice of Boar’s Head Bacon.

 

 

 

 

 

To assemble the Burger I took the bottom slice of the Muffin and added some of the Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. Next I added the Burger, Bacon Slice, Crumbled Blue Cheese, and the top half slice of the Muffin. And I had one incredible Burger! The Burger its self has bits of Wild Idea Buffalo Bacon in it along with Blue Cheese. Then the added Maytag Blue Cheese, Bacon slice, and Blackberry Jam just put this Burger over the top! That was my last Wild Idea Bacon Blue Burger that I had in the freezer. I’ll be ordering more but right now Wild Idea is out of stock on them.

 

 

The Maytag Crumbled Blue Cheese I used is hard to find. I used to buy it at the Kroger Cheese Shop but they no longer carry it. So now I have order it DIRECT from Maytag Dairy Farms (https://www.maytagdairyfarms.com/) I also ordered some of their Cheddar Cheese Spread. Both are so good, the best Blue Cheese that I have ever found!

 

 

 


Then for a side I prepared some Simply Potatoes Shredded Hash Browns. Seasoned them with Salt and Pepper and served them sprinkled with Sargento Reduced Fat Shredded Sharp Cheddar. For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn and Diet Peach Snapple to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo – BACON BLUE BURGER (3 BURGER PER LB)
Our 100% prairie grass-fed Premium Ground Buffalo mixed with our 100% Buffalo Bacon, Blue Cheese and just the right amount of seasoning! For additional flavor try it with grape jelly or your favorite preserve – absolutely scrumptious! We did the work for you and… you’re welcome! Three one-third pound handcrafted burgers per package.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/products/three-1-3-lb-bacon-bleu-burger

 

 

 

 

 

Maytag Farms

Seventy seven-years after the first wheels of Maytag Blue Cheese were made, our family tradition continues. Each wheel is handcrafted on the family farm in the rolling hills of central Iowa. We are still owned and operated by the grandchildren and great-grandchildren of E.H. Maytag. His legacy is the pleasure and joy taken from good food shared with people you cherish and we are proud to be a part of it.

On October 11, 1941, the first wheels of Maytag Blue Cheese were formed and put to age in our caves. Today, the tradition continues.
https://www.maytagdairyfarms.com/

Chicken Thigh Sliders w/ Baked Fries

January 21, 2014 at 6:11 PM | Posted in chicken, Ore - Ida | 9 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Chicken Thigh Sliders w/ Baked Fries

 

 

Mom  Chick Thigh Sliders 004
They nailed our weather forecast of snow, wind, and falling temperature. We ended up with 3″ more inches with a strong wind that took the temps to single digits and below. It’s only January but we’re already above our average of yearly snowfall. Plus our temperatures have been lower than what we’ve in the past few years, single digits and below zero through Saturday. Just cook and be happy! For dinner tonight, Chicken Thigh Sliders w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

 

Mom  Chick Thigh Sliders 002
I picked up a package of Boneless and skinless Chicken Thighs yesterday at Walmart. So to prepare them I cut them in half, to fit the slider buns, and seasoned them with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, and a little Garlic Powder. I then rolled them in some Flour that I had seasoned with Hungarian Sweet Ground Paprika. I then preheated the oven to 400 degrees. Heated a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat, added in the Canola Oil. Seared both sides of the chicken until golden, about 5 minutes and then placed it in the oven to finish off, and the chicken registers 165 degrees F on an instant-read thermometer. They came out perfect! Crispy coating on the outside and moist and flavorful on the inside. I served them on Pepperidge Farms Slider Wheat Buns. Had topping choices of Lettuce, Mayfield Crumbled Blue Cheese, and JB’s Fat Boy Stick Stuff BBQ Sauce.

 

 

 
For a side for the Sliders I baked some of our favorite Fries, Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries. Best Fries out there in my opinion. Then for dessert/snack later some Newman’s Own Black Bean and Corn Salsa along with Tostios Multi Grain Scoops.

 

 

 
Chicken Thighs

Boneless and skinless chicken thighs are a form of protein that can be cooked in any number of ways. The chicken thigh is a cut of meat and doesn’t tend to dry out like chicken breast tends to. If you remove the skin you’re left with a chicken thigh that has about 130 calories and only 7 grams of fat. Here are several ways to prepare boneless skinless chicken thighs.
* Cook in the slow cooker.

* Bake in the oven.

* Cook on the grill.

* Fry in a pan.

Cheese of the Week – Maytag Blue Cheese

August 15, 2012 at 9:19 AM | Posted in cheese, cooking, Food | Leave a comment
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Maytag is a blue cheese produced on the Maytag Dairy Farms outside of Newton, Iowa, the former home of the Maytag Corporation. In

Maytag Blue Cheese

1938, Iowa State University developed a new process for making blue cheese from homogenized cow’s milk instead of the traditional sheep’s milk.

In 1941, production of the cheese was started by Frederick L. Maytag II and Robert Maytag, grandsons of the founder of the Maytag appliance company, Frederick Louis Maytag I. In the beginning, the milk for the cheese came from a prize winning herd of Holstein cattle that was established by E. H. Maytag, a son of the Maytag founder.
The company is currently owned by the third and fourth generations of the Maytag family.

The process for making Maytag Blue Cheese was discovered and patented by two Iowa State University microbiologists, Clarence Lane and Bernard W. Hammer. Roquefort, another type of blue cheese, had been made for hundreds of years in Europe, but attempts to manufacture a similar cheese in the United States had thus far been unsuccessful. Difficulties encountered in making these types of cheeses produced a less than satisfactory product, and quality control would have been disastrous.
The problems encountered with producing Roquefort type cheeses in the United States for distribution were the lengthy time required to develop the artisan flavor, the mold growth not being uniform, the quality being below average for numerous lots produced, and the color of the curd being too dark.
The process begins with homogenizing the milk that will be used for the cheese. In making Maytag Blue Cheese, the cream is separated from the milk, homogenized and then added back into the now skim milk. This would typically occur between 80 and 100 degrees Fahrenheit (27 and 38 °C) and 2000 to 3500 pounds-force per square inch (14 to 24 MPa) of pressure. This would allow for proper fat hydrolysis, which affects the flavor of the cheese.
There is a ripening period prior to adding rennet (an enzyme that coagulates milk into curds and whey) to the cheese. A typical usage would be to add 3 ounces of rennet per 100 pounds of milk, allowing it to set in a temperature range of 85 to 86 degrees Fahrenheit (30 °C). Better results were achieved using 4 ounces of rennet per 100 pounds of milk and setting in a higher than usual temperature range of 90 to 92 °F (32 to 33 °C).
According to Lane and Hammer’s records, their alterations caused the cheese-making process to speed up from this point forward, with the time in between setting, cutting and dipping nearly cut in half. Also, after dipping the cheese and allowing it to cook in hot whey, the draining time was cut from 20–30 minutes to 3–5 minutes.
Penicillium is then added to the finished product, which produces its characteristic green veins.
After the rounds of cheese are made by hand, the cheese is aged in specially designed caves where they are exposed to high humidity and cool temperatures.
The company still uses the same time-consuming method of hand making cheese, using milk only from local dairy farms.

From this modified process discovered at Iowa State University, the color, flavor, and texture are more uniform and desired for this type of cheese, thus allowing it to be produced consistently in a manufacturing setting. Maytag has dominated the American blue cheese industry since its inception.

Nutritional information

1 oz of Blue Cheese:
Food energy 100 calories (420 kJ)
Energy from Fat 73 cal (310 kJ)
Total Fat 8 g
Saturated Fat 5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 2 g
Cholesterol 21 mg
Sodium 395 mg
Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Protein 6 g.

Not So Sloppy Turkey Joes w/ Crinkle Fries

June 12, 2012 at 5:18 PM | Posted in diabetes friendly, ground turkey, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Jennie-O Turkey Products, low calorie, low carb, Ore - Ida | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Not So Sloppy Turkey Joes w/ Crinkle Fries

 

 

It was Not So Sloppy Turkey Joe’s for dinner tonight. I used Hormel Not So Sloppy Joe Sauce again. I love this Sloppy Joe Sauce it’s Thick and Hearty with great flavor. Easier to use than Sloppy Joe Mix also. No adding water and extra simmering time. I used Jennie – O Extra Lean Ground Turkey which is only 120 calories and 0 carbs! Istarted by browning the Turkey in Extra Virgin Olive Oil and seasoned it with Ground Smoked Cumin, Ground Thyme, Parsley, Sea Salt, and Ground Pepper. With the sauce already seasoned I still like to get the healthy herbs and spices in when I can. When the Turkey was done I drained the skillet of excess fat and oil and added the jar of Sauce, stirring until mixed and warmed. Easy to fix and delicious. I topped it with some crumbled Maytag Blue Cheese and on a Healthy Life Whole Grain Bun. I had Ore Ida Baked Crinkle Fries as a side. For dessert later a bowl of Blue Bunny Frozen Yogurt Chocolate and Vanilla Swirl.

Not So Sloppy Turkey Joes

Ingredients

1 Tablesponn Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Ground Smoked Cumin, Cilantro, Sea Salt, Pepper to taste
1 lb. Lean Ground Turkey
1 Jar of Not So Sloppy Joes Sauce
Crumbled Bleu Cheese for topping
Healthy Life Whole Grain Sandwich Buns

Directions:

Brown Turkey in large skillet on medium-high heat, seasoning to taste. Drain fat.
Add and stir Not So Sloppy Joe Sauce stir until well mixed and heated.
Serve on buns top Turkey Joes with Crumbled Bleu Cheese.

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