Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 23, 2017 at 5:31 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Lori for passing this hint along…….

 
Didn’t know this one – If you are baking a cake and are an egg short, blend in a couple of tablespoons of mayonnaise.

One of America’s Favorites – Coleslaw

March 20, 2017 at 6:27 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Coleslaw (also known as cole slaw or simply slaw) is a salad consisting primarily of finely shredded raw cabbage and dressed most commonly with a vinaigrette salad dressing. Prepared in this manner, coleslaw can be pickled for up to four weeks if it is stored in an airtight container. Another way to make coleslaw is to use foods that already contain vinaigrette: mayonnaise, for example, is commonly used.

Coleslaw is frequently served as a side dish in traditional meals in many countries, and can be seen in major fast food chains as well.

 

 

Coleslaw made with mayonnaise

There are many variations of the recipe, which include the addition of other ingredients such as red cabbage, pepper, shredded carrots, onion, grated cheese, pineapple, or apple, mixed with a salad dressing such as mayonnaise or cream. A variety of seasonings, such as celery seed, may be added. The cabbage may come in finely minced pieces, shredded strips, or small squares. Other slaw variants include broccoli slaw, which uses shredded raw broccoli in place of the cabbage. Cream, sour cream, or buttermilk are also popular additions. Buttermilk coleslaw is most commonly found in the southern United States.

 
In the United States, coleslaw often contains buttermilk, mayonnaise or mayonnaise substitutes, and carrot, although many regional variations exist, and recipes incorporating prepared mustard or vinegar without the dairy and mayonnaise are also common. Barbecue slaw, also known as red slaw, is made using ketchup and vinegar rather than mayonnaise. It is an essential part of “Lexington style” North Carolina barbecue.

 
Coleslaw is generally eaten as a side dish with foods such as fried chicken and barbecued meats and may be accompanied by French fries or potato salad as another side dish. It also may be used as a sandwich ingredient, being placed on barbecue sandwiches, hamburgers, and hot dogs along with chili and hot mustard. A vinegar-based coleslaw is the signature ingredient to a Primanti Brothers sandwich. Coleslaw also is used on a variant of the Reuben sandwich, with coleslaw substituting for the sauerkraut; the sandwich is commonly called a Rachel to differentiate it from the Reuben.

 
According to The Joy of Cooking (1997), raw cabbage is the only entirely consistent ingredient in coleslaw; the type of cabbage, dressing, and added ingredients vary widely. Vinaigrette, mayonnaise, and sour cream based dressings are all listed; bacon, carrots, bell peppers, pineapple, pickles, onions, and herbs are specifically mentioned as possible added ingredients.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Ham Salad and Egg Salad

September 12, 2016 at 5:05 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Ham Salad

Ham salad spread on wheat bread

Ham salad spread on wheat bread

Ham salad is a traditional Anglo-American salad. Ham salad resembles chicken salad, egg salad, and tuna salad (as well as starch-based salads like potato salad, macaroni salad, and pea salad): the primary ingredient, ham, is mixed with smaller amounts of chopped vegetables or relishes, and the whole is bound with liberal amounts of a mayonnaise, salad cream, or other similar style of salad dressing, such as Miracle Whip.

Ham salad generally includes cooked, cold ham which has been minced, cubed, or ground; the mayonnaise or other dressing; diced sour or sweet cucumber pickles or cucumber pickle relish; and perhaps chopped raw celery, green pepper, or onion. Raw cucumber, shredded carrot, pimento, sweet corn kernels, or tomato are sometimes used. Very often, the salad is mixed or garnished with generous quantities of chopped hard-boiled egg; less frequently, grated cheese may be used, or peas or boiled potato may be added to bulk out the dish. The salad is kept chilled until serving.

Like other mayonnaise-bound meat salads, the finished dish typically has a chunky, grainy, or pasty texture, and is frequently served as a spread upon crackers or upon bread in a sandwich.

Ham salad is still very popular in western Pennsylvania, and is also fairly popular in the Upper Midwest, Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern regions of the United States, which have long histories of pork and ham production.

As with other Anglo-American salads, the recipe for ham salad has many regional and family variations. Similar salads are made using chopped or ground bologna, Spam, and other cured or potted meats and sausages.

 

 

 

Egg Salad

Egg salad sandwich with french fries

Egg salad sandwich with french fries

Egg salad is part of a tradition of salads involving protein mixed with seasonings in the form of herbs, spices, and other foods, and bound with mayonnaise. Its siblings include chicken salad, crab salad, ham salad, lobster salad, and tuna salad.

Egg salad is often used as a sandwich filling, typically made of chopped hard-boiled eggs, mayonnaise, mustard, minced celery and onion, salt, black pepper, and paprika. It is also often used as a topping on green salad.

Egg salad can be made creatively with any number of other cold foods added. Bacon, bell pepper, capers, cheese, cucumber, onions, lettuce, pickle relish, and pickles are common additional ingredients.

A closely related sandwich filler is egg mayonnaise, wherein chopped hard-boiled egg is mixed with mayonnaise only.

 

Condiment of the Week – Remoulade

May 5, 2016 at 4:56 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | 2 Comments
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A half-spoon of French remoulade

A half-spoon of French remoulade

Rémoulade (English pronunciation: /reɪməˈlɑːd/; French: [ʁemulad]) is a condiment invented in France that is usually aioli- or mayonnaise-based. Although similar to tartar sauce, it is often more yellowish (or reddish in Louisiana), sometimes flavored with curry, and sometimes contains chopped pickles or piccalilli. It can also contain horseradish, paprika, anchovies, capers and a host of other items. While its original purpose was possibly for serving with meats, it is now more often used as an accompaniment to seafood dishes, especially pan-fried breaded fish fillets (primarily sole and plaice) and seafood cakes (such as crab or salmon cakes).

 
Remoulade is used in France, Denmark, Iceland, Faroe Islands, Germany, Poland, Sweden, Netherlands, Norway and in the United States, especially in Louisiana Creole cuisine. It is used with french fries, on top of roast beef items, and as a hot dog condiment, although there are a multitude of other applications:

* France: rémoulade is made from mayonnaise to which is added vinegar, mustard, shallots, capers, chopped pickles, and/or fresh herbs (chives, tarragon, chervil, burnet). It is commonly used in céleri rémoulade, which consists of thinly cut pieces of celeriac with a mustard-flavored remoulade and also to accompany red meats, fish and shellfish.
* Belgium: One of the condiments for frites, often sold at takeaway stands.
* Netherlands: Often served with fried fish.
* Germany: Mainly used with fried fish, and as an ingredient of potato salads. When marketed as “Danish remoulade”, it is used for the “Danish hot dog”, fish with boiled potatoes, dill and creamed spinach.
* Sweden: Remouladsås – the French version – is a common accessory to fried or breaded fish dishes, and used as topping on roast beef. The Danish version is also available, and is used on a variety of dishes referred to as ‘Danish-style’, for example Danish hot-dogs, Danish smørrebrød and suchlike.
* Denmark: An essential ingredient on open-face roast beef sandwiches (smørrebrød), along with Fried onion. Remoulade is also used for fish meatballs or breaded fillets of fish (e.g. cod or plaice) along with lemon slices. For french fries, the Danes can usually order tomato ketchup, remoulade or both, although in recent years mayonnaise has gained ground. In most regions it is used on hot dogs along with hot or sweet mustard, ketchup, fried or raw onions and pickled cucumber slices.
* Norway: Primarily served with deep fried fish.
* Iceland: remúlaði is a condiment commonly served on hot dogs, together with mustard, ketchup, and raw and fried onions.
* USA: Typically served as a condiment with seafoods and certain vegetables. Fried soft-shell crab sandwiches may be served with remoulade as the only sauce.
* Louisiana Creole cuisine: Remoulade often contains paprika and tends to be have a tannish or pink tint due to the use of Creole brown mustard like Zatarain’s, small amounts of ketchup, cayenne pepper, and paprika.

 
Varieties
Sauce rémoulade
According to Larousse Gastronomique, rémoulade is 1 cup of mayonnaise with 2 tablespoons mixed herbs (parsley, chives, chervil and tarragon), 1 tablespoon drained capers, 2 finely diced cornichons and a few drops of anchovy essence (optional). Some recipes use chopped anchovy fillets. The rémoulade used in céleri rémoulade is a simple mustard-flavored mayonnaise spiced with garlic and pepper. Rémoulade is classified in French cooking as a derivative of the mayonnaise sauce.

Danish remoulade
Danish remoulade has a mild, sweet-sour taste and a medium yellow color. The typical industrially-made variety does not contain capers, but finely-chopped cabbage and pickled cucumber, fair amounts of sugar and hints of mustard, cayenne pepper, coriander and onion, and turmeric for color. The herbs are replaced by herbal essences, e.g. tarragon vinegar. Starch, gelatin or milk protein may be added as thickeners.

Homemade or gourmet varieties may use olive oil (especially good with fish), capers, pickles, carrots, cucumber, lemon juice, dill, chervil, parsley or other fresh herbs, and possibly curry.

Louisiana remoulade

Louisiana remoulade can vary from the elegant French-African Creole, the rustic Afro-Caribbean Creole, or the Classic Cajun version, and like the local variants of roux, each version is different from the French original. Creole versions often have tan or pink hues and are usually piquant. Louisiana-style remoulades fall generally into one of two categories—those with a mayonnaise base and those with an oil base, but sometimes both mayonnaise and oil are used. Each version may have finely chopped vegetables, usually green onions and celery, and parsley; most are made with either Creole or stone-ground mustard. Salt, black pepper, and cayenne pepper are also standard ingredients. In the oil- and mayonnaise-based versions, the reddish hue often comes from the addition of a small amount of ketchup. The sauce is often topped with paprika for the aesthetics as well as the flavor. Generally, acidity is added with the inclusion of lemon juice or vinegar. Other additions include hardboiled egg or raw egg yolks, minced garlic, hot sauce, vinegar, horseradish, capers, cornichons, and Worcestershire sauce.

While the classic white remoulade is a condiment that can be offered in a variety of contexts (e.g. the classic celery

Louisiana-style remoulade sauce

Louisiana-style remoulade sauce

root remoulade), Creole remoulade is used on shrimp, crabs, fried calamari, artichokes, and fried green tomatoes among other foods. Today, shrimp remoulade is a very common cold appetizer in New Orleans Creole restaurants, although, historically, hard boiled eggs with remoulade was a less expensive option on some menus. Shrimp remoulade is most often served as a stand-alone appetizer (usually on a chiffonade of iceberg lettuce). One might also see crawfish remoulade, but remoulade sauce is very seldom offered in restaurants as an accompaniment with fish; cocktail sauce and tartar sauce are generally the condiments of choice. Food columnist and cookbook author Leon Soniat suggests to “Serve [remoulade] over seafood or with sliced asparagus.”

Central Mississippi has Comeback sauce, a condiment that is very similar to Louisiana remoulade.

 

Condiment of the Week – Mayonnaise

March 10, 2016 at 5:53 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | 2 Comments
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Jar of pale-yellow mayonnaise

Jar of pale-yellow mayonnaise

Mayonnaise (/ˈmeɪəneɪz/, /ˌmeɪəˈneɪz/ or in AmE also /ˈmæneɪz/, and often abbreviated as mayo /ˈmeɪoʊ/) is a thick, creamy sauce often used as a condiment. It is a stable emulsion of oil, egg yolk, and either vinegar or lemon juice, with many options for embellishment with other herbs and spices. Proteins and lecithin in the egg yolk serve as emulsifiers in both mayonnaise and hollandaise sauce. Commercial egg-free alternatives are available for vegans and others who want to avoid animal products and cholesterol, or who are allergic to eggs.

Mayonnaise varies in color, but is often white, cream, or pale yellow. It may range in texture from that of light cream to a thick gel. In countries influenced by French culture, mustard is also a common ingredient, but the addition of mustard turns the sauce into a remoulade with a different flavor and the mustard acts as an additional emulsifier.

 

 

Standard ingredients and tools to make mayonnaise

Standard ingredients and tools to make mayonnaise

Mayonnaise can be made by hand with a mortar and pestle, whisk or fork, or with the aid of an electric mixer or blender. It is made by slowly adding oil to an egg yolk, while whisking vigorously to disperse the oil. The oil and the water in yolks form a base of the emulsion, while lecithin and protein from the yolks are the emulsifiers that stabilize it. Additionally, a bit of a mustard may also be added to sharpen its taste, and further stabilize the emulsion. Mustard contains small amounts of lecithin. If vinegar is added directly to the yolk it can emulsify more oil, thus making more mayonnaise.

For large-scale preparation of mayonnaise where mixing equipment is being employed the process typically begins with the dispersal of eggs, either powdered or liquid, into water. Once emulsified, the remaining ingredients are then added and vigorously mixed until completely hydrated and evenly dispersed. Oil is then added as rapidly as it can be absorbed. Though only a small part of the total, ingredients other than the oil are critical to proper formulation. These must be totally hydrated and dispersed within a small liquid volume, which can cause difficulties including emulsion breakdown during the oil-adding phase. Often a long agitation process is required to achieve proper dispersal/emulsification, presenting one of the trickiest phases of the production process. Though, as technology in the food industry advances, processing has been shortened drastically allowing roughly 1000 liters to be produced in 10 minutes.

 
Commercial mayonnaise sold in jars originated in Philadelphia in 1907 when Amelia Schlorer decided to start selling her own mayonnaise recipe originally used in salads sold in the family grocery store. Mrs. Schlorer’s Mayonnaise was an instant success with local customers and eventually grew into the Schlorer Delicatessen Company. Around the same time in New York City, a family from Vetschau, Germany, at Richard Hellmann’s delicatessen on Columbus Avenue, featured his wife’s homemade recipe in salads sold in their delicatessen. The condiment quickly became so popular that Hellmann began selling it in “wooden boats” that were used for weighing butter. In 1912, Mrs. Hellmann’s mayonnaise was mass-marketed and later was trademarked in 1926 as Hellmann’s Blue Ribbon Mayonnaise.

 

 

Making mayonnaise with a whisk

Making mayonnaise with a whisk

A typical formulation for commercially made mayonnaise (not low fat) can contain as much as 80% vegetable oil, usually soybean but sometimes olive oil. Water makes up about 7% to 8% and egg yolks about six percent. Some formulas use whole eggs instead of just yolks. The remaining ingredients include vinegar (4%), salt (1%) and sugar (1%). Low-fat formulas will typically decrease oil content to just 50% and increase water content to about 35%. Egg content is reduced to 4% and vinegar to 3%. Sugar is increased to 1.5% and salt lowered to 0.7%. Gums or thickeners (4%) are added to increase viscosity, improve texture, and ensure a stable emulsion.

There are several ways to prepare mayonnaise, but on average it contains around 700 kilocalories (2,900 kJ) per 100 grams, or 94 calories per tablespoon. This makes mayonnaise a calorically dense food.

 

 

Vegan sandwich with egg-free mayo

Vegan sandwich with egg-free mayo

There are egg-free versions of mayonnaise available for vegans and others who want to avoid eggs, animal fat, and cholesterol, or who have egg allergies. In the US, these alternatives cannot be labelled as “mayonnaise” because of the FDA’s definition of mayonnaise making egg a requirement.

Well-known brands include Nayonaise and Vegenaise in North America, and Plamil Egg Free in the UK.

In August 2015, the United States Food and Drug Administration sent out a warning letter to the San Francisco company Hampton Creek, objecting to the name of their “Just Mayo” product, which is not egg-based and therefore does not meet the U.S. legal definition of “mayonnaise”.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Tartar Sauce

January 11, 2016 at 6:28 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Tartar sauce is often served with fried seafood

Tartar sauce is often served with fried seafood

Tartar sauce (in the UK, New Zealand and Australia, tartare sauce) is a mayonnaise or aioli-based sauce, typically of a rough consistency. It is often used as a condiment with seafood dishes.

 
Tartar sauce is based on either mayonnaise (egg yolk, mustard or vinegar, oil) or aioli (egg yolk, olive oil, garlic, lemon juice), with certain other ingredients added. In the UK, recipes typically add to the base capers, gherkins, lemon juice, and tarragon. US recipes may include chopped pickles or prepared green sweet relish, capers, onions (or chives), and fresh parsley. Chopped hard-boiled eggs or olives are sometimes added, as may be Dijon mustard and cocktail onions. Paul Bocuse describes sauce tartare explicitly as a sauce remoulade, in which the characterising anchovy purée is to be substituted by some hot Dijon mustard.

 
The sauce and its name have been found in cookbooks since the 19th century. The name derives from the French sauce tartare, named after the Tatars (Ancient spelling in French of the ethnic group: Tartare) from the Eurasian Steppe, who once occupied Ukraine and parts of Russia. Beyond this, the etymology is unclear.

An idea of what people in the nineteenth century meant by naming something “tartar” can be found in a recipe of Isabella Beeton in “The Book of Household Management” of 1861, recipe no. 481, “Tartar mustard”, made of horseradish vinegar, cayenne and ordinary mustard. In her recipe no. 503, “Remoulade, or French Salad-Dressing”, she describes a preparation with tarragon that can hardly be identified with a Remoulade as standardized by Auguste Escoffier forty years later or as it is considered today. But she explains that the tarragon for her recipe of “Green Remoulade” comes originally from Tartary. In the days of Tsarism, the Russian properties in Asia south of Siberia were frequently called Tartary, especially when an exotic undertone was intended. Sauce Tartare might be a descriptive term for a tarragon mayonnaise named after the origin of the so-called Russian tarragon, which actually is rarely used for culinary purposes.

In 1903 Auguste Escoffier gave a recipe for Sauce Remoulade (Rec. No. 130) with both mustard and anchovy essence, but he used only the term Sauce Tartare for it in the rest of the book. This is still common use in Austria and former Austrian regions like Bohemia, where Sauce Remoulade and Sauce Tartare are synonyms on restaurant menus. The German dictionary “Langenscheidt, Maxi-Wörterbuch English, 120.000 Phrases of 2002” identifies Tartar(e) Sauce as Remouladensosse.

In the early era of the Haute Cuisine from about 1890 to the outbreak of World War I in 1914 minced filet of beef was dressed with Sauce Tartare and served raw as Boeuf Tartare or steak tartare with regard to the sauce’s name. Between the World Wars, until today, it came into fashion to serve the dish with regard to the raw unprocessed meat just with the unprocessed ingredients of the sauce.

In fact, the Tatars have nothing to do with the sauce or raw beef steaks. Especially in the Haute Cuisine era, dish names were frequently selected from contemporary, fashionable, public issues to gain attention.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Deviled Egg

September 14, 2015 at 5:01 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A plate of deviled eggs

A plate of deviled eggs

Deviled eggs (US) or devilled eggs (UK) are hard-boiled eggs, shelled, cut in half, and filled with the hard-boiled egg’s yolk mixed with other ingredients such as mayonnaise and mustard, but many other variants exist internationally. Deviled eggs are usually served cold. They are served as a side dish, appetizer or a main course, and are a common holiday or party food.

 

 

The term “deviled”, in reference to food, was in use in the 18th century, with the first known print reference appearing in 1786. In the 19th century, it came to be used most often with spicy or zesty food, including eggs prepared with mustard, pepper or other ingredients stuffed in the yolk cavity.

In parts of the Southern and Midwestern United States, the terms “stuffed eggs”, “salad eggs”, “dressed eggs”, or “angel eggs” are also used, particularly when served in connection with church functions, avoiding the name “Devil.” The term “angel eggs” is also used in association with deviled eggs stuffed with “healthier” alternatives.

 

 

Cool hard-boiled eggs are peeled and halved lengthwise, and the yolks are removed. The yolks are then mashed and mixed with a variety of other ingredients, such as mayonnaise and mustard. Tartar sauce or Worcestershire sauce are also frequently used. Other common flavorings include: diced pickle or pickle relish, salt, ground black pepper, powdered cayenne pepper or chipotle chillies, turmeric, vinegar, green olives, pimentos, poppyseed, thyme, cilantro, minced onion, pickle brine, caviar, cream, capers, and sour cream. The yolk mixture is then scooped with a spoon and piped back into each egg “cup”. Old Bay, paprika, curry powder, cayenne, chives, and dill may then be sprinkled on top as a garnish. It may be further decorated with dollops of caviar, anchovy, bacon, shrimp or herring.

 

 

Contemporary versions of deviled eggs tend to include a wider range of seasonings and added foods, such as garlic, horseradish, wasabi, sliced jalapeños, cheese, chutney, capers, salsa, hot sauce, ham, mushrooms, spinach, sour cream, caviar, shrimp, smoked salmon or other seafood, and sardines.

 

Deviled egg plate

Deviled egg plate

The deviled egg can be seen in recipes as far back as ancient Rome, where they were traditionally served as a first course. It is still popular across the continent of Europe. In France it is called œuf mimosa; in Hungary, töltött tojás (“stuffed egg”) or kaszinótojás (“casino egg”); in Romania, ouă umplute (“stuffed eggs”); in the Netherlands gevuld ei (“stuffed egg”); in Sweden fyllda ägg (“stuffed eggs”); in Malta it is called bajd mimli (“stuffed eggs”). In many European countries, especially Belgium, France, the Netherlands and Germany, a variation is served known as “Russian eggs”. This consists of eggs cut in half, served with vegetable macédoine and garnished with mayonnaise, parsley and tomato. Contrary to what the name might suggest, the dish does not originate in Russia: its name derives from the fact that the eggs are served on a bed of macédoine, which is sometimes called Russian salad. In the Black Forest region of Germany, Russian eggs may be garnished with caviar. In Sweden, the deviled egg is a traditional dish on the Easter Smörgåsbord, where the yolk is mixed with caviar, cream or sour cream, optionally chopped red onion, and decorated with chopped chives or dill, perhaps with a piece of anchovy or pickled herring. Deviled eggs are a common dish in the United States. In the Midwestern and Southern U.S., they are commonly served as hors d’oeuvres before a full meal is served, often during the summer months. Deviled eggs are so popular in the United States that special carrying trays are sold for them. Prepared and packaged deviled eggs are now available in some U.S. supermarkets.

In French cuisine, the other ingredients are most likely to be pepper and parsley. In Hungarian cuisine the yolks are mashed and mixed with white bread soaked in milk, mustard and parsley, often served as an appetizer in mayonnaise or as a main course baked in the oven with Hungarian sour cream topping and served with French fries. Other common flavorings of the yolks in the German cuisine are anchovy, cheese and caper.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

August 14, 2015 at 5:22 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments
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Thank you to Cathy L. for passing this Hint along!….

 
When you can’t get the last bit of mayonnaise or salad dressing out of the jar, try dribbling a little of your favorite vinegar into it, put the cap on tightly and shake well. You’ll be amazed at how much you’ve been wasting.

One of America’s Favorites – Tuna Fish Sandwich

June 22, 2015 at 5:14 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A tuna fish sandwich, also known as a tuna salad sandwich or a tuna sandwich, is a type of sandwich made from

A tuna fish sandwich with black olives and avocado

A tuna fish sandwich with black olives and avocado

canned tuna, usually combined with other ingredients such as mayonnaise and celery. Other common variations include the tuna boat and tuna melt.

The sandwich has been called “the mainstay of almost everyone’s American childhood,” and “the staple of the snatched office lunch for a generation.” In the United States, 52% of canned tuna is used for sandwiches.

 
A tuna fish sandwich is usually made with canned tuna mixed with mayonnaise and other ingredients, such as chopped celery, pickles or pickle relish, hard-boiled eggs, onion, cucumber, sweetcorn, and/or black olives. Other recipes may use olive oil, Miracle Whip, salad cream, mustard, or yogurt instead of or in addition to mayonnaise. The sandwich may be topped with lettuce, tomato or other vegetables and fruits, such as cucumbers, bean sprouts or avocado in any combination.

A tuna melt sandwich served with French fries

A tuna melt sandwich served with French fries

A tuna melt has melted cheese on top of the tuna or on a tomato slice and is served on toasted bread. A tuna boat is a tuna sandwich served in a hot dog bun or long split bread roll.

 
Tuna is a relatively high protein food and it is very high in omega-3 fatty acids. A sandwich made from 100 grams of tuna and two slices of toasted white bread has approximately 287 Calories, 96 Calories of which are from fat (10.5 grams fat). It also has 20 grams of protein and 27 grams of carbohydrates.

According to the StarKist company:

The nutritional content of albacore may vary naturally from catch to catch. In particular, the fat and calorie content will differ depending on the region or depth where the fish are caught. Albacore tuna that swim close to the water surface can be higher in fat than tuna caught in deep ocean waters—but they are also lower in mercury content and higher in omega-3 content. Because availability of albacore tuna may vary from season to season, we use two different labels to accurately show the fat and calorie content of the product contents.

A larger, commercially prepared tuna fish sandwich has more calories than noted above, based on its serving size. A 6-inch Subway tuna sub of 238 grams has 480 calories, 210 of those from fat, 600 miligrams of sodium, and 20 grams of protein.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Lobster Roll

January 19, 2015 at 6:34 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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A lobster roll from "The Lobster Claw" in Bar Harbor, Maine

A lobster roll from “The Lobster Claw” in Bar Harbor, Maine

A traditional lobster roll is a sandwich filled with lobster meat soaked in butter and served on a steamed hot dog bun or similar roll, so that the opening is on the top rather than on the side. There are variations of this sandwich made in other parts of New England, which may contain diced celery or scallion, and mayonnaise. The sandwich may also contain lettuce, lemon juice, salt and black pepper. Traditional New England restaurants serve lobster rolls (made with butter, not mayonnaise) with potato chips or french fries on the side.[citation needed] The lobster roll was first originated at a restaurant named Perry’s, in Milford, Connecticut as early as 1929, according to John Mariani’s,

 

“Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink.” Once Perry’s put the new sandwich on its menu, its popularity spread up and down the Connecticut coast, but not far beyond. For those residing in Connecticut, a lobster roll served warm is simply called a “lobster roll” while the lobster roll served cold as it is throughout the rest of the northeast region and the world is called a “lobster salad roll” . The lobster salad roll took off on the Eastern End of Long Island, New York, starting in 1965, pioneered by the Lobster Roll Restaurant The Lobster Roll.

 

 

As far back as 1970, chopped lobster meat heated in drawn butter was served on a hot dog bun at road side stands such as Red’s Eats in Maine, Lobster rolls in the U.S. are associated with the state of Maine, but are also commonly available at seafood restaurants in the other New England states and on Eastern Long Island, where lobster fishing is common. They tend to be virtually unheard-of in landlocked regions (such as the Upper Midwest), where fresh lobster is more expensive and more difficult to obtain.

Lobster rolls prepared in Maine generally have several common characteristics: first, the roll itself is a “New England” or “Frankfurter” roll that is baked slightly differently from a standard hot dog roll, so the sides are flat and can be buttered on the outside and lightly grilled or toasted, and is split on the top instead of the side; second, the lobster meat in the roll is usually served cold, rather than warm or hot; third, there can be a very light spread of mayonnaise inside the bun or tossed with the meat before filling the roll, though usually do not have any other ingredients typical of the “lobster salad” variation in other parts of New England. The lobster meat is usually knuckle, claw, and tail meat chunks, with 4oz of meat (“1/4 pound”) the common advertised serving size.

They are a staple summer meal throughout the Maritime provinces in Canada, particularly Nova Scotia where they may also appear on hamburger buns, baguettes, or other types of bread rolls — even pita pockets. The traditional sides are potato chips and dill pickles.

 

 

McDonald's McLobster lobster roll sandwich

McDonald’s McLobster lobster roll sandwich

McDonald’s McLobster lobster roll sandwich
Some McDonald’s restaurants in New England and the Canadian Maritimes offer lobster rolls as a seasonal menu item when McDonald’s can buy frozen lobster cheaply, called the McLobster Roll.

 

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BECAUSE I JUST CAN'T SEEM TO MAKE UP MY MIND

Miami Cuisine

Simple Recipes / Recetas Simples

Trkingmomoe's Blog

Low Budget Meals for the New Normal