BBQ Marinated Pork Chop w/ Cut Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, and Wheat Bread

December 31, 2013 at 6:30 PM | Posted in Idahoan Potato Products, JB's Fatboy Sauces and Rub, pork chops | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: BBQ Marinated Pork Chop w/ Cut Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, and Wheat Bread

 

 

BBQ Pork Chop Mah Pot 003
Another very cold day outside again. It’s in the low 20’s but feels a lot colder with the wind chill, buts of sunshine to brighten it up a bit. I can’t believe another year has gone by! I just want to thank each and every one of you for all your views and comments throughout the year! Without WordPress I would have never had the chance to connect with all of you. Thank you again! So for dinner tonight i prepared a BBQ Marinated Pork Chop w/ Cut Green Beans, Mashed Potatoes, and Wheat Bread.

 

 

 
I had the Pork Chop in the freezer so I let it thaw overnight in the fridge. About noon I added some JB’s Fat Boy Haug Waush BBQ Sauce to a Hefty Zip Bag and added the Chop and let it marinate the rest of the day. When ready to prepare it I took it out of the bag, shaking off the excess. I then seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. i heated up a Cast Iron Skillet, sprayed with a little Pam Cooking Spray and added Canola Oil. When the Skillet and Oil was heated up I added my Chop to it. I fried it about 4 minutes or so per side, till the internal temperature reached 155 degrees. Nice size Chop and it came out moist with a fantastic flavor, love the JB’s Fat Boy Sauce!

 

 

 
For one side dish I heated up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans, my favorite canned Green Bean. Then I also heated up some Idahoan Mashed Potatoes. They come in a microwavable container; just add water and microwave for 1 1/2 minutes. They come out perfect every time! I also had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later a Jello Double Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

Thank you again for a lot of fun throughout the year, have a fun and safe New Years Eve!

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Prime Rib w/ Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Baked Cheddar Bay Biscuits

December 25, 2013 at 7:06 PM | Posted in BEEF, Bob Evan's, greenbeans, prime rib | 7 Comments
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Today’s Special Christmas Menu: Prime Rib w/ Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Baked Cheddar Bay Biscuits

 

 

Christmas 2013 Prime Rib 004

Let me start by saying “Merry Christmas” to everyone! In the past we always had a huge family gathering for Christmas Dinner but the today as the last couple of Christmas Dinner it’s just been Mom and Dad and myself. It’s been a quiet relaxing Christmas. Another cold one out but not as bad as yesterday, no wind today made the difference. For dinner it was a feast! I prepared a Prime Rib w/ Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Baked Cheddar Bay Biscuits.

 

 

 

I had purchased a Seasoned Half  Beef Ribeye for Prime Rib Roast at a local GFS Market in nearby Fairfield a while back and had it in the freezer. Laid it out in the fridge yesterday to thaw so it was ready for the oven today. Nice size one, 7.750 lbs. of nothing but Prime Rib! So easy to prepare, just preheated the oven at 250 degrees. Then placed the roast in a medium size roasting pan with a rack in it. Sprayed the rack with Pam Spray and added a 1/4″ of water to the pan. Then placed the Roast on the rack and basted it in its own juices that were in the bag. Placed it in the oven for about 2 1/2 hours, til a thermometer read 120 degrees, perfect medium rare! As it was roasting I would baste it from time to time with the juice. We buy our Prime Rib from GFS every year and the quality is always spot on. Tender, moist, and just bursting with flavor! This one was so tender you could cut it with your fork. Plus always the good thing, lots of leftovers for some incredible Prime Rib Sandwiches!

 

 

 

Prime Rib as far as I’m concerned is a meal in its self but Mom and Dad love the side dishes. So for one side I heated up our favorite Mashed Potatoes, Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes. These are so good and saves so much time than having to peel, cook and mashed potatoes! Then I also heated a jar of the Canned Green Beans we had Canned earlier this year. Nothing like fresh Green Beans in the Winter! As if that’s not enough my dad wanted some Corn on the Cob so I boiled some Mini Ears of Green Giant Mini Ears of Sweet Corn. I used the juice of the Prime Rib when it was done for some Gravy and I baked some Red Lobster Cheddar Bay Biscuits. First time I had baked this one. Just mixed the Packet of Biscuit with water and grated Cheddar Cheese. Mixed it into a dough and made it into balls on to a baking sheet. Baked at 425 degrees for 16 minutes. When ready I basted them with a Garlic Butter Sauce while they were still hot. Tasted just like what you get at the Red Lobster! For dessert later a Skinny Cow Chocolate Truffle Ice Cream Bar.

 

 

 

 

GFS Prime Rib

GFS Seasoned Half Beef Ribeye for Prime Rib Roast

 

• A classic holiday choice for parties, banquets, and special events
• Slowly oven-roasted for juicy,full flavor
• Carefully selected USDA Choice and Select beef options

 

 

GFS

Herb Crusted Pork Tenderloin w/ Mashed Potatoes, Boiled Mini Carrots, and…

December 14, 2013 at 6:02 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, carrots, pork tenderloin | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Herb Crusted Pork Tenderloin w/ Mashed Potatoes, Boiled Mini Carrots, and Wheat Bread.

 

 

 Pork Loin 006

Big difference in the temperature this morning, 34 degrees! The snow they called for came in as rain then switched to flurries late afternoon. This afternoon we went to purchase our annual Prime Rib Roast for Christmas Day. It was just shy of 8 lbs., the price for Prime Rib just keeps going up every year. For dinner tonight it’s a Herb Crusted Pork Tenderloin w/ Mashed Potatoes, Boiled Mini Carrots, and Wheat Bread.

 

 

 

I preheated the oven to 450 degrees F. and placed the pork loin on a rack in a roasting pan. I then combined Sea Salt, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Minced Garlic, Thyme, Rosemary, and Basil in a small bowl. Then with my fingers, massaged the mixture onto the pork loin, covering all of the meat and fat. I roasted the pork for 20 minutes, make sure you have your stove overhead fan running as it start to smoke somewhat after about 20 minutes. I then reduced the heat to 425 degrees F and roasted it for an additional 20 minutes. Test for doneness using an instant-read thermometer. When the internal temperature reaches 155 degrees F, remove the roast from the oven. Allow it to sit for about 20 minutes before carving. It will continue to cook while it rests. then be ready to slice one delicious and juicy Pork Tenderloin! I left the recipe below. I didn’t have to roast this one as long as the recipe calls for because it a small roast. This is my favorite way to prepare Pork Loin Tenderloin Roasts, just the right amount of Herbs and Garlic and it comes out a perfect medium rare.

 

 

 

For my sides with the Roast I used some leftover Mashed Potatoes from last night’s dinner, Bob Evan’s Brand Mashed Potatoes. I also boiled some Mini Carrots and had a couple of slices of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Vanilla Bean Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

Herb Crusted Pork Tenderloin

Ingredients:

1 (4-pound) boneless pork loin, with fat left on
1 tablespoon salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon dried thyme or 2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme leaves
1 teaspoon dried basil or 2 teaspoons fresh basil leaves
1 teaspoon dried rosemary or 2 teaspoons minced fresh rosemary

 

 

Directions:
Preheat oven to 450 degrees F.

Place the pork loin on a rack in a roasting pan. Combine the remaining ingredients in a small bowl. With your fingers, massage the mixture onto the pork loin, covering all of the meat and fat.

Roast the pork for 30 minutes, then reduce the heat to 425 degrees F and roast for an additional hour. Test for doneness using an instant-read thermometer. When the internal temperature reaches 155 degrees F, remove the roast from the oven. Allow it to sit for about 20 minutes before carving. It will continue to cook while it rests.

Cubed Steak w/ White Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, and Green Beans

December 13, 2013 at 6:11 PM | Posted in BEEF, Bob Evan's, greenbeans | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Cubed Steak w/ White Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, and Green Beans

 

 Cubed Steak 004

 

Warming up around here, up to 9 degrees this morning! We have a few inches left on the ground and they say starting tonight into tomorrow night we have another 3 or 4 inches on the way. Got out again running a couple of errands and back home. Dinner tonight; Cubed Steak w/ White Gravy, Mashed Potatoes, and Green Beans.

 

 

 

I normally don’t eat Beef but I’m making an exception tonight. While at Meijer came across some beautiful looking Cubed Steak. They looked too nice to pass up so I picked a package. They come 2 to a package, so it was one for dinner and one for the freezer. They were good size patties so I was able to cut them in half and had 1 for dinner and the other half for breakfast. To prepare them I seasoned them with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper and I then rolled them in flour that I had mixed with a bit of Hungarian Paprika. Shook off the excess flour and pan fried them in Canola Oil, about 4 minutes per side. They came out delicious! Excellent flavor and very tender, especially for Cubed Steak which sometimes can be somewhat tough and stringy.

 

 

 

For a side dish I heated up some Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes, just microwave for 6 minutes total. Then I also made some Pioneer Peppered White Gravy, that I used to put on the Mashed Potatoes and Cubed Steak. I also heated up a small can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later a Del Monte No Sugar Added Mango Chunk Cup.

 

 

 

 

Cube SteakCubed Steak 003

Cube steak is a cut of beef, usually top round or top sirloin, tenderized by fierce pounding with a meat tenderizer, or use of an electric tenderizer. The name refers to the shape of the indentations left by that process (called “cubing”). Many professional cooks[who?] insist that regular tenderizing mallets cause too much mashing to produce a proper cube steak, and insist on either using specialized cube steak machines, or manually applying a set of sharp pointed rods to pierce the meat in every direction. This is the most common cut of meat used for chicken fried steak.

 

In Canada as well as in some parts of the United States, cube steak may be called a minute steak, because it can be cooked quickly.
Others distinguish minute steak as:[2]
* simply referring to the cut, which is not necessarily tenderized;
* thinner than cube steak (hence does not need tenderizing);
* cut from sirloin or round, while cube steak cut is from chuck or round.
The term “minute steak” is also used in the United Kingdom, where the term “cube steak” is little known.

 

 

 

Beef Cuts

 

Cubed Steak

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beef cut: Round
Steak type: Cube Steak

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 3, 2013 at 10:06 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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You’ve managed to talk the rest of the family into helping you with tonight’s scalloped potatoes, but now the potatoes are peeled long before you need them! To keep peeled potatoes from discoloring, place them in a bowl of cold water with a few drops of white vinegar, then refrigerate. Drain before cooking and add a small amount of sugar to the cooking water to revive some of the lost flavor.

Panko Crusted Veal Cutlet w/ Peppered White Gravy, Sugar Snap Peas, and Mashed Potatoes

November 13, 2013 at 6:03 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, veal | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Panko Crusted Veal Cutlet w/ Peppered White Gravy, Sugar Snap Peas, and Mashed Potatoes

 

 
Well my favorite time of the year, Autumn, has come and quickly gone. Winter has moved in and in a big way!. We had a little cover of snow and cold yesterday, then this morning it was our lowest temperature in a while. I went out and got the morning paper and it was only 13 degrees, and it felt like it! So it’s good-bye Fall and hello Winter I guess. For dinner I prepared Panko Crusted Veal Cutlet w/ Peppered White Gravy, Sugar Snap Peas, and Mashed Potatoes.

Panko Crusted Veal Cutlet 003

 
While at Jungle Jim’s Market a while back I purchased some Veal Cutlets, I used one the day I purchased them and froze the other. I laid that one out in the fridge to thaw overnight. I got the big three out to bread these beautiful Veal Cutlet; Flour, Egg Beaters, and Panko Bread Crumbs. I seasoned the flour with Sea Salt and Ground Pepper and added some Hungarian Paprika to the Egg Beater’s. These were thick cutlets so I had to fry them a little bit longer than you would normally fry Veal. I fried them in Canola Oil about 5 minutes per side. The coatings gave it a fantastic golden brown coating and the cutlet was tender and moist, and seasoned just right. You could cut by using a fork! Topped it with some Pioneer Peppered White Gravy that I prepared. And as you can tell by the picture its big enough to cut in half and have the other half for lunch tomorrow.

 

 
Then for one side I had Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes, leftover from the other night, that I reheated in the microwave. Topped them with some of the Pioneer Peppered White Gravy that I prepared. I also heated a bag of Walmart’s Marketside Sugar Snap Peas. It comes in a microwavable bag, just heat 2 minutes and done. I also had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Jolly Time Pop Corn.

 

 

 

Panko Crusted Veal Cutlet

Panko Crusted Veal Cutlet

Veal
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Veal is the meat of young cattle (calves), as opposed to meat from older cattle. Though veal can be produced from a calf of either sex and any breed, most veal comes from male calves (bull calves) of dairy cattle breeds.

What to do With – Leftover Turkey and Mashed Potato

November 8, 2013 at 8:41 AM | Posted in Ham, potatoes | 1 Comment
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So much leftover  Turkey and Mashed Potatoes and so many delicious Leftover Recipes to choose from! Here’s one for you, Leftover Turkey and Mashed Potato Shepherd’s Pie.

 
Leftover Turkey and Mashed Potato Shepherd’s Pie

 

 

INGREDIENTS:

1 1/2 lbs Leftover Turkey, fork shredded
1 Onion chopped
1-2 cups Vegetables – chopped Carrots, Corn, Peas
1 1/2 cups Leftover Mashed Potatoes, or a bit more if you have them
8 tablespoons butter (1 stick), Blue bonnet Light Stick Butter
1/2 cup Swanson‘s Low Sodium Chicken Broth or Stock
1 teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce
Sea Salt, Pepper, other seasonings of choice

 
Directions:

1 Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Sauté onions in butter until tender over medium heat (10 mins). If you are adding vegetables, add them according to cooking time. Put any carrots in with the onions. Add corn or peas either at the end of the cooking of the onions, or after the meat has initially cooked.

2 Add leftover Turkey and sauté until heated. Add salt and pepper. Add worcesterchire sauce. Add half a cup of chicken broth and cook, uncovered, over low heat for 10 minutes, adding more chicken broth as necessary to keep moist.

3 Place turkey and onions in baking dish. Distribute mashed potatoes on top. Rough up with a fork so that there are peaks that will brown nicely. You can use the fork to make some designs in the potatoes as well.

4 Cook in 400 degree oven until bubbling and brown (about 20 -25 minutes). Broil for last few minutes if necessary to brown. Enjoy!

Peach Pork Tenderloin w/ Mashed Potatoes and Asparagus Tips

October 26, 2013 at 5:37 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, pork tenderloin | 4 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Peach Pork Tenderloin w/ Mashed Potatoes and Asparagus Tips

004

 

Down right cold around here! In the 20’s early and then in the 30’s but with one cold wind. Cloudy all day so it was a good day to stay in and be a couch potato. After a delicious Breakfast and a light Lunch it was time for dinner! I made what I had planned on making yesterday, until I was distracted by a beautiful Whole Roaster Chicken, a Peach Pork Tenderloin. Dinner tonight; Peach Pork Tenderloin w/ Mashed Potatoes and Asparagus Tips.

 

 
I came across the The Peach Pork Tenderloin recipe in an issue of Diabetes Forecast Magazine. I love Pork Tenderloin recipes and this one was no exception. A great spice seasoning mix of – 2 tsp. Ground Cumin, 1 tsp. Dried Thyme Leaves, 1 tsp. Dried Sage, 1 tsp. Ground Cinnamon, 1/4 tsp. Sea Salt, and 1/4 tsp. Ground Black Pepper. Then what really set taste buds going, 1/2 cup No Sugar Added Peach Preserves! What a great glaze this provided with for the Pork. It provided just the right amount of flavor, nothing over powering. This is one fantastic Pork Tenderloin dish, a keeper recipe! The Pork came out with that nice Peach Glaze and was moist and flavorful on the inside. Just season, baste, and bake (on 450 degrees). Bake for about 25 – 30 minutes or until the Pork reached 160 degrees by a meat thermometer in the thickest part of the Tenderloin. Easy to prepare, very little clean-up, and a delicious Pork Tenderloin with an incredible flavor.

 

 
For a side to go with the Pork I heated up my favorite Mashed Potatoes, Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes. Just microwave for a total of 6 minutes, and done. I also heated up a can of Del Monte Asparagus Cuts and Tips. Very good for canned Asparagus. I also had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later a Jello Sugarless Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

001

Peach Pork Tenderloin

Ingredients:
2 tsp. Ground Cumin
1 tsp. Dried Thyme Leaves
1 tsp. Dried Sage
1 tsp. Ground Cinnamon
1/4 tsp. Sea Salt
1/4 tsp. Ground Black Pepper
2 Pork Tenderloins (1 lb. each)
1/2 cup No Sugar Added Peach Preserves

 

Directions:

1) Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. Coat a rimmed baking sheet with Pam Cooking Spray; set aside
2) In a small bowl, combine all the spices. Rub the spice mixture over the tenderloins. Brush the tenderloins with the Peach Preserves.
3) Insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of one tenderloin.
4) Roast the Pork for about 25 minutes or until the thermometer registers 160 degrees.
5) Remove the Pork from the oven and place on a platter. Let stand 10 minutes before carving.
Makes: 8 servings Serving Size: 3 oz.
Per Serving: Calories 125, Fat 3 g (Sat. Fat 1 g), Carbohydrate 4 g (Fiber 2 g, Sugars 0 g), Cholesterol 60 mg, Sodium 100 mg, Potassium 370 mg, Protein 22 g,

 
http://www.diabetesforecast.org/2013/nov/recipes/peachy-pork-tenderloin.html?print=t

October 14, 2013 at 5:19 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, greenbeans, veal | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Panko Crusted Veal Cutlet w/ Peppered White Gravy, Green Beans and Mashed Potatoes

 

 

Veal Cutlet White Gravy 005
Just a drop dead gorgeous Autumn Day out today! We’ve been lucky with the weather this year. Cooler weather coming in though with highs around 60 or mid 50’s. The trees around here are really starting to turn and a few have lost their leaves. For dinner tonight another comfort food classic; Panko Crusted Veal Cutlet w/ Pepper White Gravy, Green Beans and Mashed Potatoes.

 

 

 

While at Jungle Jim’s Market last week I purchased some Veal Cutlets. I always have to pick up some Veal while at Jungle Jim’s, they have the best around! I got the big three out to bread these beautiful Veal Cutlets; Flour, Egg Beaters, and Panko Bread Crumbs. I seasoned the flour with Sea Salt and Ground Pepper and added some Hungarian Paprika to the Egg Beater’s. These were thick cutlets so I had to fry them a little bit longer than you would normally fry Veal. I fried them in Canola Oil about 5 minutes per side. The coatings gave it a fantastic golden brown coating and the cutlet was tender and moist, and seasoned just right. You could cut by using a fork! Topped it with some Pioneer Peppered White Gravy that I whipped up.

 

 

For sides I warmed up some leftover Green Beans that my Mom had made the night before. Nice size and full Green Beans. I also heated up an individual serving of Bob Evans Mashed Potatoes and topped them with a bit of Peppered White Gravy also.. I had a couple of slices of Klosterman Wheat Bread also. For dessert later a Skinny Cow Ice Cream Bar.

 

 

 

 veal-cutlet-002

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Veal is the meat of young cattle (calves), as opposed to meat from older cattle. Though veal can be produced from a calf of either sex and any breed, most veal comes from male calves (bull calves) of dairy cattle breeds.

Fall Harvest: Potatoes

October 13, 2013 at 9:32 AM | Posted in potatoes | 1 Comment
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Potato cultivars appear in a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes

Potato cultivars appear in a variety of colors, shapes, and sizes

 

Potatoes are excellent storage vegetables, but most varieties are harvested in the fall. Potatoes are harvested from spring (new potatoes) through fall, and are an excellent storage vegetable to hold through winter. The thin-skinned, uncured new potatoes of spring and summer should be prepared differently from the more mature potatoes harvested in fall or stored over winter. Here are hearty, satisfying dishes featuring such potatoes.

 

 

The potato is a starchy, tuberous crop from the perennial Solanum tuberosum of the Nightshade family. The word may refer to the plant itself as well as the edible tuber. In the region of the Andes, there are some other closely related cultivated potato species. Potatoes were introduced outside the Andes region four centuries ago, and have become an integral part of much of the world’s cuisine. It is the world’s fourth-largest food crop, following rice, wheat and maize. Long-term storage of potatoes requires specialised care in cold warehouses.
Wild potato species occur throughout the Americas, from the United States to southern Chile. The potato was originally believed to have been domesticated independently in multiple locations, but later genetic testing of the wide variety of cultivars and wild species proved a single origin for potatoes in the area of present-day southern Peru and extreme northwestern Bolivia (from a species in the Solanum brevicaule complex), where they were domesticated 7,000–10,000 years ago. Following centuries of selective breeding, there are now over a thousand different types of potatoes.[6] Of these subspecies, a variety that at one point grew in the Chiloé Archipelago (the potato’s south-central Chilean sub-center of origin) left its germplasm on over 99% of the cultivated potatoes worldwide.
The annual diet of an average global citizen in the first decade of the 21st century included about 33 kg (73 lb) of potato. However, the local importance of potato is extremely variable and rapidly changing. It remains an essential crop in Europe (especially eastern and central Europe), where per capita production is still the highest in the world, but the most rapid expansion over the past few decades has occurred in southern and eastern Asia. China is now the world’s largest potato-producing country, and nearly a third of the world’s potatoes are harvested in China and India.

 

Potato plants

Potato plants

 
The potato contains vitamins and minerals, as well as an assortment of phytochemicals, such as carotenoids and natural phenols. Chlorogenic acid constitutes up to 90% of the potato tuber natural phenols. Others found in potatoes are 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (crypto-chlorogenic acid), 5-O-caffeoylquinic (neo-chlorogenic acid), 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acids. A medium-size 150 g (5.3 oz) potato with the skin provides 27 mg of vitamin C (45% of the Daily Value (DV)), 620 mg of potassium (18% of DV), 0.2 mg vitamin B6 (10% of DV) and trace amounts of thiamin, riboflavin, folate, niacin, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, and zinc. The fiber content of a potato with skin (2 g) is equivalent to that of many whole grain breads, pastas, and cereals.
The potato is best known for its carbohydrate content (approximately 26 grams in a medium potato). The predominant form of this carbohydrate is starch. A small but significant portion of this starch is resistant to digestion by enzymes in the stomach and small intestine, and so reaches the large intestine essentially intact. This resistant starch is considered to have similar physiological effects and health benefits as fiber: It provides bulk, offers protection against colon cancer, improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, lowers plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, increases satiety, and possibly even reduces fat storage. The amount of resistant starch in potatoes depends much on preparation methods. Cooking and then cooling potatoes significantly increases resistant starch. For example, cooked potato starch contains about 7% resistant starch, which increases to about 13% upon cooling.
The cooking method used can significantly affect the nutrient availability of the potato.
Potatoes are often broadly classified as high on the glycemic index (GI) and so are often excluded from the diets of individuals trying to follow a low-GI diet. In fact, the GI of potatoes can vary considerably depending on type (such as red, russet, white, or Prince Edward), origin (where it was grown), preparation methods (i.e., cooking method, whether it is eaten hot or cold, whether it is mashed or cubed or consumed whole, etc.), and with what it is consumed (i.e., the addition of various high-fat or high-protein toppings).
In the UK, potatoes are not considered by the NHS as counting towards the five portions of fruit and vegetables diet.

 

 

Russet potatoes with sprouts

Russet potatoes with sprouts

* Potatoes are used to brew alcoholic beverages such as vodka, potcheen, or akvavit.
* They are also used as food for domestic animals.
* Potato starch is used in the food industry as, for example, thickeners and binders of soups and sauces, in the textile industry, as adhesives, and for the manufacturing of papers and boards.
* Maine companies are exploring the possibilities of using waste potatoes to obtain polylactic acid for use in plastic products; other research projects seek ways to use the starch as a base for biodegradable packaging.
* Potato skins, along with honey, are a folk remedy for burns in India. Burn centers in India have experimented with the use of the thin outer skin layer to protect burns while healing.
* Potatoes (mainly Russets) are commonly used in plant research. The consistent parenchyma tissue, the clonal nature of the plant and the low metabolic activity provide a very nice “model tissue” for experimentation. Wound-response studies are often done on potato tuber tissue, as are electron transport experiments. In this respect, potato tuber tissue is similar to Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans and Escherichia coli: they are all “standard” research organisms.

 

 

Various potato dishes

Various potato dishes

Potatoes are prepared in many ways: skin-on or peeled, whole or cut up, with seasonings or without. The only requirement involves cooking to swell the starch granules. Most potato dishes are served hot, but some are first cooked, then served cold, notably potato salad and potato chips/crisps.
Common dishes are: mashed potatoes, which are first boiled (usually peeled), and then mashed with milk or yogurt and butter; whole baked potatoes; boiled or steamed potatoes; French-fried potatoes or chips; cut into cubes and roasted; scalloped, diced, or sliced and fried (home fries); grated into small thin strips and fried (hash browns); grated and formed into dumplings, Rösti or potato pancakes. Unlike many foods, potatoes can also be easily cooked in a microwave oven and still retain nearly all of their nutritional value, provided they are covered in ventilated plastic wrap to prevent moisture from escaping; this method produces a meal very similar to a steamed potato, while retaining the appearance of a conventionally baked potato. Potato chunks also commonly appear as a stew ingredient.
Potatoes are boiled between 10 and 25 minutes, depending on size and type, to become soft.

 

 
In the United States, potatoes have become one of the most widely consumed crops and thus have a variety of preparation methods and condiments. French fries and often hash browns are commonly found in typical American fast-food burger joints and cafeterias. One popular favorite involves a baked potato with cheddar cheese (or sour cream and chives) on top, and in New England “smashed potatoes” (a chunkier variation on mashed potatoes, retaining the peel) have great popularity. Potato flakes are popular as an instant variety of mashed potatoes, which reconstitute into mashed potatoes by adding water, with butter or oil and salt to taste. A regional dish of Central New York, salt potatoes are bite-size new potatoes boiled in water saturated with salt then served with melted butter. At more formal dinners, a common practice includes taking small red potatoes, slicing them, and roasting them in an iron skillet. Among American Jews, the practice of eating latkes (fried potato pancakes) is common during the festival of Hanukkah.
A traditional Acadian dish from New Brunswick is known as poutine râpée. The Acadian poutine is a ball of grated and mashed potato, salted, sometimes filled with pork in the center, and boiled. The result is a moist ball about the size of a baseball. It is commonly eaten with salt and pepper or brown sugar. It is believed to have originated from the German Klöße, prepared by early German settlers who lived among the Acadians.
Poutine, by contrast, is a hearty serving of French fries, fresh cheese curds and hot gravy. Tracing its origins to Quebec in the 1950s, it has become a widespread and popular dish throughout Canada.

 

 

 

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