Seafood of the Week – Lobster

October 8, 2013 at 10:55 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | 1 Comment
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American lobster, Homarus americanus, with claws banded

American lobster, Homarus americanus, with claws banded

Clawed lobsters comprise a family (Nephropidae, sometimes also Homaridae) of large marine crustaceans. They have long bodies with muscular tails, and live in crevices or burrows on the sea floor. Three of their five pairs of legs have claws, including the first pair, which are usually much larger than the others. Highly prized as seafood, lobsters are economically important, and are often one of the most profitable commodities in coastal areas they populate. Commercially important species include two species of Homarus from the northern Atlantic Ocean, and scampi – the northern-hemisphere genus Nephrops and the southern-hemisphere genus Metanephrops. Although several other groups of crustaceans have the word “lobster” in their names, the unqualified term “lobster” generally refers to the clawed lobsters of the family Nephropidae. Clawed lobsters are not closely related to spiny lobsters or slipper lobsters, which have no claws (chelae), or to squat lobsters. The closest living relatives of clawed lobsters are the reef lobsters and the three families of freshwater crayfish.

 

 

Lobsters are invertebrates with a hard protective exoskeleton. Like most arthropods, lobsters must moult in order to grow, which leaves them vulnerable. During the moulting process, several species change colour. Lobsters have 10 walking legs; the front three pairs bear claws, the first of which are larger than the others. Although, like most other arthropods, lobsters are largely bilaterally symmetrical, some genera possess unequal, specialised claws.
Lobster anatomy includes the cephalothorax which fuses the head and the thorax, both of which are covered by a chitinous carapace, and the abdomen. The lobster’s head bears antennae, antennules, mandibles, the first and second maxillae, and the first, second, and third maxillipeds. Because lobsters live in a murky environment at the bottom of the ocean, they mostly use their antennae as sensors. The lobster eye has a reflective structure above a convex retina. In contrast, most complex eyes use refractive ray concentrators (lenses) and a concave retina. The abdomen includes swimmerets and its tail is composed of uropods and the telson.
Lobsters, like snails and spiders, have blue blood due to the presence of haemocyanin which contains copper (in contrast, vertebrates and many other animals have red blood from iron-rich haemoglobin). Lobsters possess a green hepatopancreas, called the tomalley by chefs, which functions as the animal’s liver and pancreas.
Lobsters of the family Nephropidae are similar in overall form to a number of other related groups. They differ from freshwater crayfish in lacking the joint between the last two segments of the thorax, and they differ from the reef lobsters of the family Enoplometopidae in having full claws on the first three pairs of legs, rather than just one. The distinctions from fossil families such as Chilenophoberidae are based on the pattern of grooves on the carapace.

 

 

Large lobsters are estimated to have aged up to 60 years old, although determining age is difficult.
Research suggests that lobsters may not slow down, weaken, or lose fertility with age, and that older lobsters may be more fertile than younger lobsters. This longevity may be due to telomerase, an enzyme that repairs DNA sequences of the form “TTAGGG”. Lobsters express telomerase as adults through most tissue, which has been suggested to be related to their longevity. This sequence, repeated hundreds of times, occurs at the ends of chromosomes and are referred to as telomeres.
Lobsters, like many other decapod crustaceans, grow throughout life, and are able to add new muscle cells at each molt. Lobster longevity allows them to reach impressive sizes. According to Guinness World Records, the largest lobster ever caught was in Nova Scotia, Canada, weighing 20.15 kilograms (44.4 lb).

 

 

Lobsters are found in all oceans. They live on rocky, sandy, or muddy bottoms from the shoreline to beyond the edge of the continental shelf. They generally live singly in crevices or in burrows under rocks.
Lobsters are omnivores and typically eat live prey such as fish, mollusks, other crustaceans, worms, and some plant life. They scavenge if necessary, and are known to resort to cannibalism in captivity. However, when lobster skin is found in lobster stomachs, this is not necessarily evidence of cannibalism – lobsters eat their shed skin after moulting. While cannibalism was thought to be nonexistent among wild lobster populations, it was observed in 2012 by researchers studying wild lobsters in Maine, where it is theorized that these first known instances of lobster cannibalism in the wild can be attributed to a local population explosion among lobsters caused by the disappearance of many of the Maine lobsters’ natural predators.
In general, lobsters are 25–50 centimetres (10–20 in) long, and move by slowly walking on the sea floor. However, when they flee, they swim backward quickly by curling and uncurling their abdomen. A speed of 5 metres per second (11 mph) has been recorded. This is known as the caridoid escape reaction.
Symbiotic animals of the genus Symbion, the only member of the phylum Cycliophora, live exclusively on lobster gills and mouthparts. Different species of Symbion have been found on the three commercially important lobsters of the north Atlantic OceanNephrops norvegicus, Homarus gammarus and Homarus americanus.

 

 

Lobster recipes include Lobster Newberg and Lobster Thermidor. Lobster is used in soup, bisque, lobster rolls, and cappon magro. Lobster meat may be dipped in clarified butter, resulting in a sweetened flavour.
Cooks boil or steam live lobsters. The lobster cooks for seven minutes for the first pound and three minutes for each additional pound.
According to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the mean level of mercury in American lobster is 0.31 ppm.

 

 

The most common way of killing a lobster is by placing it live in boiling water (with or without spending a period of time in a freezer) or by splitting it by severing the body in half lengthwise. Lobsters may also be killed or rendered insensate immediately before boiling by a stab into the brain, in the belief that this will stop suffering. However, a lobster’s brain operates from not one but several ganglia and disabling only the frontal ganglion does not usually result in death or unconsciousness. The boiling method is illegal in some places, such as in Reggio Emilia, Italy, where offenders face fines of up to €495.

 

 

Steamed whole lobster, with claws cracked and tail split

Steamed whole lobster, with claws cracked and tail split

In North America, the American lobster did not achieve popularity until the mid-19th century, when New Yorkers and Bostonians developed a taste for it, and commercial lobster fisheries only flourished after the development of the lobster smack, a custom-made boat with open holding wells on the deck to keep the lobsters alive during transport. Prior to this time, lobster was considered a mark of poverty or as a food for indentured servants or lower members of society in Maine, Massachusetts, and the Canadian Maritimes, and servants specified in employment agreements that they would not eat lobster more than twice per week. Lobster was also commonly served in prisons, much to the displeasure of inmates. American lobster was initially deemed worthy only of being used as fertilizer or fish bait, and it was not until well into the twentieth century that it was viewed as more than a low-priced canned staple food.
Caught lobsters are graded as new-shell, hard-shell or old-shell, and because lobsters which have recently shed their shells are the most delicate, there is an inverse relationship between the price of American lobster and its flavour. New-shell lobsters have paper-thin shells and a worse meat-to-shell ratio, but the meat is very sweet. However, the lobsters are so delicate that even transport to Boston almost kills them, making the market for new-shell lobsters strictly local to the fishing towns where they are offloaded. Hard-shell lobsters with firm shells, but with less sweet meat, can survive shipping to Boston, New York and even Los Angeles, so they command a higher price than new-shell lobsters. Meanwhile, old-shell lobsters, which have not shed since the previous season and have a coarser flavour, can be air-shipped anywhere in the world and arrive alive, making them the most-expensive. One seafood guide notes that an eight-dollar lobster dinner at a restaurant overlooking fishing piers in Maine is consistently delicious, while “the eighty-dollar lobster in a three-star Paris restaurant is apt to be as much about presentation as flavor”.

 

 

Lobsters are caught using baited, one-way traps with a colour-coded marker buoy to mark cages. Lobster is fished in water between 1 and 500 fathoms (2 and 900 m), although some lobsters live at 2,000 fathoms (3,700 m). Cages are of plastic-coated galvanised steel or wood. A lobster fisher may tend as many as 2,000 traps. Around the year 2000, due to overfishing and high demand, lobster aquaculture expanded. As of 2008, no lobster aquaculture operation had achieved commercial success, due mainly to the fact that lobsters eat each other (cannibalism) and the slow growth of the species; these two problems make it difficult to make lobster aquaculture profitable.

 

 

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 11, 2013 at 10:31 AM | Posted in cooking | 2 Comments
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Chefs always add clams to their chowder during the last 15-20 minutes of cooking. If added too early, clams can become either tough or too soft.

 

 

New England clam chowder.

New England clam chowder.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

February 1, 2013 at 9:46 AM | Posted in seafood | Leave a comment
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If your eating a whole lobster and bibs aren’t your thing, cover the lobster with a napkin or towel before twisting off the legs and claws. This will keep the juices from squirting out.

The Future of Food: 2050 – Food Day

September 12, 2012 at 2:41 PM | Posted in cooking, Food | 2 Comments
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The Future of Food2050

Hosted by Hon. Chellie Pingree

Welcome by Michael F. Jacobson, Center for Science in the Public Interest

5:00 p.m. Reception (location TBA)

6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. U.S. Capitol Visitor Center

 

What will we be eating in the year 2050?  How will that food be produced?  Where is the food movement going?  Food Day’s national marquee event conference will bring together forward-thinking experts on agriculture policy, nutrition, and sustainability to discuss the future of Americans’ diet and food system.  Save the date if you can join us, stay tuned for details, and get your crystal ball ready!

Great Inland Seafood Festival 2012

July 30, 2012 at 1:42 PM | Posted in Festivals, fish, Food, grilling | Leave a comment
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I thought I would give everyone an earl heads up for the Great Inland Seafood Festival 2012. This year it’s August 9, 10, 11, & 12. It’s always a great time with some great tasting Seafood at this event. My favorite foods there are the Seafood Coneys and of course the Whole Maine Lobster (for only $10.95!) There’s 10,00 of the Lobsters and believe me get there early because they are gone in no time. if you get a chance stop on down and this year on the Ohio side of the river The Banks is open!
Great Inland Seafood Festival 2012

The 25th Great Inland Seafood Festival will take place August 9, 10, 11, & 12, 2012 on the banks of the Ohio River in Newport Kentucky.

Event Hours:

Thursday August 9 5 p.m.- 11 p.m.

Friday August 10 5 p.m. – 11 p.m.

Saturday August 11 Noon – 11 p.m.

Sunday August 12 Noon – 9 p.m.

Whole Maine Lobsters $10.95
This year’s Great Inland Seafood Festival will again offer Whole Maine Live Lobsters for $10.95 each. This poplular tradition is a hallmark of the Seafood Festival. Come early as 10,000 lobsters sell fast!!! We are usually sold out by early Sunday afternoon.

Fabulous Entertainment
The Great Inland Seafood Festival prides itself in providing FREE entertainment. Our stage is always busy with continuous live entertainment. Headliners include:……….

The Best Seafood You’ll Ever Taste!
Over 15 local restaurants & National vendors will be selling the best tasting, freshest seafood available. Items to try include: Whole Maine Lobsters, shrimp, crawfish, crablegs, oysters, salmon, redfish, and much, much more….

FREE and accessible to all!
The Great Inland Seafood Festival is free and accessible to all. The event is on Riverboat Row in Newport Kentucky. There is ample parking around the event. Handicap parking is available on Columbia Street.

From Columbus and North
I-71 South to I-471 South
Newport Exit (Route 8 / Dave Cowens Drive / Exit 5)
Continue straight into parking, or, Left at stop light onto Route 8
Follow Route 8 / Dave Cowens Drive to the Newport on the Levee/Aquarium parking garage.
From Dayton or North

I-75 South
Take the I-71 North / I-471 South / US-50 East exit from the left lane
Newport Exit (Route 8 / Dave Cowens Drive / Exit 5)
Continue straight into parking, or, Left at stop light onto Route 8
Follow Route 8 / Dave Cowens Drive to the Newport on the Levee/Aquarium parking garage.
From Kentucky, Airport, and South

I-71/75 North to I-275 East / Columbus
I-275 East to I-471 North
Newport Exit (Route 8 / Dave Cowens Drive / Exit 5)
Continue straight into parking, or, Left at stop light onto Route 8
Follow Route 8 / Dave Cowens Drive to the Newport on the Levee/Aquarium parking garage.

http://www.greatinlandseafoodfest.com/index.html

Maple Syrup Festival Hueston Woods, College Corner Ohio

February 24, 2012 at 11:15 AM | Posted in Festivals, Food, pancakes | 2 Comments
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Maple Syrup Festival @ Hueston Woods

Dates:    Saturday, March 03, 2012 – Sunday, March 04, 2012
Title:    Maple Syrup Festival @ Hueston Woods
Description:    At the main beach parking area • Explore the process of maple syrup
Times:    ALL DAY EVENT

At the main beach parking area • Explore the process of maple sugaring from the methods used by Indians to modern methods • Pancake breakfast offered from 7 AM to 1 PM for a fee • Tour the sugar bush from Noon – 4 PM • For more information call 513-523-6347

Hueston Woods State Park

6301 Park Office Road
College Corner, OH 45003
Park Office     513-523-6347
Golf Course     513-523-8081
Campground (seasonal)     513-523-1060
Camping & Getaway Rental Reservations     866-644-6727

Great Inland Seafood Festival 2011

July 17, 2011 at 11:42 AM | Posted in fish, Food, grilling, salmon, scallops, seafood | 3 Comments
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The 25th Great Inland Seafood Festival will take place August 11, 12, 13, & 14, 2011 on the banks of the Ohio River in Newport Kentucky.

Event Hours:
Thursday August 11 – 5 p.m.- 11 p.m.
Friday August 12 – 5 p.m. – 11 p.m.
Saturday August 13 – Noon – 11 p.m.
Sunday August 14 – Noon – 9 p.m.

This annual festival, along the riverbanks of Newport, features premium seafood dishes from restaurants around the Northern Kentucky / Greater Cincinnati Region and music for all. There will be daily harbor cruises at Noon – 3:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.

Over 15 local restaurants selling the best tasting, freshest seafood available. Items to try include: Whole Maine Lobsters, shrimp, crawfish, crablegs, oysters, salmon, redfish, and much, much more….

Whole Maine Lobsters $10.95

This year’s Great Inland Seafood Festival will again offer Whole Maine Live Lobsters for $10.95 each.  This poplular tradition is a hallmark of the Seafood Festival.  Come early as 10,000 lobsters sell fast!!!  We are usually sold out by early Sunday afternoon.

5 lb. Lobster Drawing Nightly at 9 p.m. Benefitting The Alabama Coastal Foundation!

Each night of the Great Inland Seafood Festival at approximately 9 p.m. we will raffle off a 5 lb. lobster.  Raffle Tickets are $5.00 or 3 for $10.00 with 100% of proceeds donated to the Alabama Coastal Foundation for Gulf Clean up and Relief Efforts.  Purchase Tickets at the City of Newport Ambassador booth.  Must be present to win.

FREE and accessible to all!
The Great Inland Seafood Festival is free and accessible to all.  The event is on Riverboat Row in Newport Kentucky.  There is ample parking around the event.  Handicap parking is available on Columbia Street

http://www.greatinlandseafoodfest.com/

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