Grilled Blackened Mahi Mahi w/ Brown Rice,Steam Crisp Corn , and…

June 15, 2013 at 6:42 PM | Posted in fish, grilling, rice | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Grilled Blackened Mahi Mahi w/ Brown Rice, Steam Crisp Corn, and Whole Grain Bread.

 

 
Another really nice day out. Ran some errands and then did some fishing for most of the afternoon. I went to our community lake, caught a few Blue Gill, three small Bass, and a Catfish. I did see one guy reel in about a 3 lb. Bass though. None I caught were very big, I released them all but had one peaceful relaxing afternoon. One man had his son and daughter with him and they were fishing for the first time. They were all using one rod so I went back home and got an old rod reel and small tackle box that I no longer use and took it back and gave it to the kids. You would have thought I gave them a car! The man was very thankful. It was all worth while watching when the kids each caught their first fish! Speaking of fish that’s what I had for dinner. I prepared a Grilled Blackened Mahi Mahi w/ Brown Rice, Steam Crisp Corn, and Whole Grain Bread.

 
I had bought a wire fish grill basket a while back, which I love using, but it’s for three fillets and if you’re not grilling three fillets it’s sort Grilled Blackened Mahi Mahi 003of bulky to use. So while at Kroger the other day I seen they had single fish fillet grill baskets so I purchased one and put it to use for dinner tonight. To prepare the Mahi Mahi I’ll need a tablespoon or so of Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter and Zatarain’s Blackened Seasoning. Preheated the grill up on high I rinsed the Grouper off and patted dry. Melted the 1 T butter in a microwave about 15 seconds and brushed both sides of the Mahi Mahi with the melted butter. I then coated both sides with a generous amount of the rub. Then I got the Fish Basket out and sprayed it with Pam Spray and I had 4 slices of a Lime and I laid those down in the basket. Loaded the Fish, skin side down on the Lime slices, in the grill basket. The Citrus keeps the skin side of Fish from sticking to the grill grate and the grate of the Fish Basket and gives your Fish more flavor at the same time. Placed my Mahi Mahi on the preheated grill and closed the lid. Grilled for only 3 minutes and then flipped it and grilled another 3 minutes. Use a watch and keep a very close eye on it, do not over cook! The result some beautifully delicious Blackened Mahi Mahi! That’s the first time I’ve had the Mahi Mahi Blackened and really like it!

 
For side dishes I prepared some Uncle Ben’s Whole Grain Brown Rice. I used the single serve micro wave Rice, just heat for 45 seconds and it’s done! I also heated up a can of Green Giant Steam Crisp Sweet Yellow and White Corn. Been on a Corn kick here lately, still love those Green Beans but Corns a close second now. I also had a couple of slices of Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. For dessert later a bowl of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream.

 

 

Zatarain’s Blackened SeasoningZatarain's Blackened Seasoning
This spicy seasoning blend is rubbed on the outside of fish (or chicken, steak or other meats) for blackening. Also great as a seasoning rub for the grill or broiler.
Ingredients:
SALT, PAPRIKA, CAYENNE PEPPER, BLACK PEPPER, WHITE PEPPER, CHILI POWDER, MONOSODIUM GLUTAMATE, ONION, GARLIC, SPICES.
Nutrition Facts

Serving Size: 1/4 tsp. (.71g)

Servings Per Container: about 120
Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Calories: 0

http://www.zatarains.com/Products/Spices-and-Extracts/Blackened-Seasoning.aspx

Fish of the Week – Mahi-Mahi

June 11, 2013 at 8:57 AM | Posted in fish, One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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The mahi-mahi or common dolphinfish (Coryphaena hippurus) is a surface-dwelling ray-finned fish found in off-shore temperate,

Bull (male) mahi-mahi caught in Costa Rica

Bull (male) mahi-mahi caught in Costa Rica

tropical and subtropical waters worldwide. Also known widely as dorado, it is one of only two members of the Coryphaenidae family, the other being the pompano dolphinfish.
Being referred to as a “dolphin” causes it to be confused with the more widely known marine mammals called dolphins.
The name mahi-mahi means very strong in Hawaiian. In other languages the fish is known as dorade coryphène, lampuga, lampuka, lampuki, rakingo, calitos, or maverikos.
Purely coincidentally, but confusingly, the word mahi means fish in Persian.

 
Mahi-mahi can live up to 5 years (although they seldom exceed four). Catches average 7 to 13 kilograms (15 to 29 lb). They seldom exceed 15 kilograms (33 lb), and mahi-mahi over 18 kilograms (40 lb) are exceptional.
Mahi-mahi have compressed bodies and long dorsal fins extending nearly the entire length of their bodies. Their caudal fins and anal fins are sharply concave. They are distinguished by dazzling colors: golden on the sides, and bright blues and greens on the sides and back. Mature males have prominent foreheads protruding well above the body proper. Females have a rounded head. Females are also usually smaller than males.
Out of the water, the fish often change color among several hues (giving rise to their Spanish name, dorado, “golden”), finally fading to a muted yellow-grey upon death.
Mahi-mahi are among the fastest-growing fish. They spawn in warm ocean currents throughout much of the year, and their young are commonly found in seaweed. Mahi-mahi are carnivorous, feeding on flying fish, crabs, squid, mackerel, and other forage fish. They have also been known to eat zooplankton and crustaceans.
Males and females are sexually mature in their first year, usually by 4-5 months old. Spawning can occur at body lengths of 20 cm. Females may spawn two to three times per year, and produce between 80,000 and 1,000,000 eggs per event.
In waters above 34 °C, mahi-mahi larvae are found year-round, with greater numbers detected in spring and fall. In one study, seventy percent of the youngest larvae collected in the northern Gulf of Mexico were found at a depth greater than 180 meters. Spawning occurs normally in captivity, with 100,000 eggs per event. Problems maintaining salinity, food of adequate nutritional value and proper size, and dissolved oxygen are responsible for larval mortality rates of 20-40%. Mahi-mahi fish are mostly found in the surface water. They feed on Sargassum weeds. Their flesh is soft and oily, similar to sardines. The body is slightly slender and long, making them fast swimmers; they can swim as fast as 50 knots (92.6 km/h, 57.5 mph).

 
Mahi-mahi are highly sought for sport fishing and commercial purposes. Sport fishermen seek them due to their beauty, size, food quality, and healthy population. Mahi-mahi is popular in many restaurants.
Mahi-mahi can be found in the Caribbean Sea, on the west coast of North and South America, the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, the Gulf of Mexico, the Atlantic coast of Florida, Southeast Asia, Hawaii and many other places worldwide.
Fishing charters most often look for floating debris and frigatebirds near the edge of the reef in about 120 feet (37 m) of water. Mahi-mahi (and many other fish) often swim near debris such as floating wood, palm trees and fronds, or sargasso weed lines and around fish buoys. Sargasso is floating seaweed that sometimes holds a complete ecosystem from microscopic creatures to seahorses and baitfish. Frigatebirds dive for food accompanying the debris or sargasso. Experienced fishing guides can tell what species are likely around the debris by the birds’ behavior.
Thirty- to fifty-pound gear is more than adequate when trolling for mahi-mahi. Fly-casters may especially seek frigatebirds to find big mahi-mahis, and then use a bait-and-switch technique. Ballyhoo or a net full of live sardines tossed into the water can excite the mahi-mahis into a feeding frenzy. Hookless teaser lures can have the same effect. After tossing the teasers or live chum, fishermen throw the fly to the feeding mahi-mahi. Once on a line, mahi-mahi are fast, flashy and acrobatic, with beautiful blue, yellow, green and even red dots of color.

 
The United States and the Caribbean countries are the primary consumers of this fish, but many European countries are increasing

Grilled mahi-mahi

Grilled mahi-mahi

their consumption every year.It is a popular eating fish in Australia, usually caught and sold as a by-product by tuna and swordfish commercial fishing operators. Japan and Hawaii are significant consumers. The Arabian Sea, particularly the coast of Oman, also has mahi-mahi. At first, mahi-mahi were mostly bycatch (incidental catch) in the tuna and swordfish longline fishery. Now they are sought by commercial fishermen on their own merits.
In French Polynesia, fishermen use harpoons, using a specifically designed boat, the poti marara, to pursue it, because mahi-mahi do not dive. The poti marara is a powerful motorized V-shaped boat, optimized for high agility and speed, and driven with a stick so the pilot can hold his harpoon with his right hand.

 
Depending on how it is caught, mahi-mahi is classed differently by various sustainability rating systems. It is also a potential vector of toxic microorganisms.
The Monterey Bay Aquarium classifies mahi-mahi, when caught in the US Atlantic, as a Best Choice, the top of its three environmental impact categories. The Aquarium advises to avoid imported mahi-mahi harvested by long line but rates troll and pole-and-line caught as a Good Alternative.
The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) classifies mahi-mahi as a “moderate mercury” fish or shellfish (its second lowest of four categories), and suggests eating six servings or fewer per month.
The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) classifies mahi-mahi caught by line/pole in the US as “Eco-Best” in its three-category system, but classifies all mahi-mahi caught by longline as only “Eco-OK” or “Eco-Worst” due to longline “high levels [of] bycatch, injuring or killing seabirds, sea turtles and sharks.”
The mahi-mahi is also a common vector for ciguatera poisoning.

 

 

 

 

 

Ginger Glazed Mahi Mahi

INGREDIENTS:
3 tablespoons honey
3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger root
1 clove garlic, crushed or to taste
2 teaspoons olive oil
4 (6 ounce) mahi mahi fillets
salt and pepper to taste
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

 

DIRECTIONS:
1. In a shallow glass dish, stir together the honey, soy sauce, balsamic vinegar, ginger, garlic and olive oil. Season fish fillets with salt and pepper, and place them into the dish. If the fillets have skin on them, place them skin side down. Cover, and refrigerate for 20 minutes to marinate.
2. Heat vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Remove fish from the dish, and reserve marinade. Fry fish for 4 to 6 minutes on each side, turning only once, until fish flakes easily with a fork. Remove fillets to a serving platter and keep warm.
3. Pour reserved marinade into the skillet, and heat over medium heat until the mixture reduces to a glaze consistently. Spoon glaze over fish, and serve immediately.

 

Nutrition
Information
Servings Per Recipe: 4
Calories: 259
Amount Per Serving
Total Fat: 7g
Cholesterol: 124mg
Sodium: 830mg
Amount Per Serving
Total Carbs: 16g
Dietary Fiber: 0.2g
Protein: 32.4g

 
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/ginger-glazed-mahi-mahi/

 

Baked Mahi Mahi w/ Brown Whole Grain Rice, Green Beans, Diced Mango, and…

February 3, 2012 at 7:01 PM | Posted in baking, diabetes, diabetes friendly, fish, Food, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, low calorie, low carb | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Mahi Mahi w/ Brown Whole Grain Rice, Green Beans, Diced Mango, and Whole Grain Bread

While trying to figure out what to have for dinner tonight I came across a piece of Mahi Mahi in the freezer, and Mahi Mahi sounded great! I seasoned with McCormick Grinders Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn and Parsley. I rubbed Extra Virgin Olive Oil on the fillet before seasoning it. I baked it at 400 degrees for 12 minutes. It came out nice and flakey seasoned just right. I love Mahi Mahi. I think it’s one of the meatiest and best tasting Fish there is. I topped with some sliced Mango. Mango or Pineapple go great with the Mahi Mahi.

I had Uncle Ben’s Brown Whole Grain Rice, Green Beans, and Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread for my sides. For dessert/snack later some Pop Corn Indiana Pop Corn Chips along with Kroger Organic Black Bean and Corn Salsa.

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