Top 50 Healthy Recipes for Winter

January 2, 2014 at 9:56 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Heat those cold winter days with the Top 50 Healthy Recipes for Winter, from the Eating Well web site.

 

 

Get fresh recipe inspiration with our top 50 recipes for winter.Eating Well
From chili recipes and stew recipes to creamy chicken recipes and baked casserole recipes, our top 50 recipes for winter are delicious, comforting recipes for the colder months of the year. These healthy recipes are hearty, filling dishes full of lean protein and the season’s best produce for meals that will leave you feeling satisfied. Try our Balsamic-Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower for a flavor-packed side dish or Baked Mac & Cheese for a lighter comfort food favorite to feed the whole family.

 

 

Baked Mac & Cheese
Mac & cheese can be a true comfort on a gloomy day, and our healthy update takes advantage of extra-sharp Cheddar balanced with creamy low-fat cottage cheese and tucks a layer of spinach into the middle, which may help picky eaters down their vegetables. Whole-wheat pasta adds robust flavor and extra fiber…..

 

 

 

Balsamic & Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower
Roasting isn’t usually the first cooking method you think of for cauliflower but the results are quite delicious. The florets are cut into thick slices and tossed with extra-virgin olive oil and herbs. Wherever the flat surfaces come into contact with the hot roasting pan, a deep browning occurs that results in a sweet, nutty flavor……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Top 50 Healthy Recipes for Winter *

 

Heat those cold winter days with the Top 50 Healthy Recipes for Winter, from the Eating Well web site.

 

 

Get fresh recipe inspiration with our top 50 recipes for winter.
From chili recipes and stew recipes to creamy chicken recipes and baked casserole recipes, our top 50 recipes for winter are delicious, comforting recipes for the colder months of the year. These healthy recipes are hearty, filling dishes full of lean protein and the season’s best produce for meals that will leave you feeling satisfied. Try our Balsamic-Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower for a flavor-packed side dish or Baked Mac & Cheese for a lighter comfort food favorite to feed the whole family.

 

 

Baked Mac & Cheese
Mac & cheese can be a true comfort on a gloomy day, and our healthy update takes advantage of extra-sharp Cheddar balanced with creamy low-fat cottage cheese and tucks a layer of spinach into the middle, which may help picky eaters down their vegetables. Whole-wheat pasta adds robust flavor and extra fiber…..

 

 

 

Balsamic & Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower
Roasting isn’t usually the first cooking method you think of for cauliflower but the results are quite delicious. The florets are cut into thick slices and tossed with extra-virgin olive oil and herbs. Wherever the flat surfaces come into contact with the hot roasting pan, a deep browning occurs that results in a sweet, nutty flavor……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Top 50 Healthy Recipes for Winter *

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/top_50_healthy_recipes_of_2013?sssdmh=dm17.712647&utm_source=EWTWNL&esrc=nwewtw122413

Seasoned Fried Haddock w/ Macaroni and Cheese, ….

November 26, 2013 at 6:14 PM | Posted in beans, Bob Evan's, fish, Zatarain's | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Seasoned Fried Haddock w/ Macaroni and Cheese, Yellow Wax and Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread

 

 

 

House cleaning yesterday and Car and Shed cleaning today. Had the Car cleaned inside and out at a local hand car wash and then came home and cleaned and straightened up the outdoor shed. It’s that time of year with the temperatures at or below freezing that the shed turns into an extra freezer and refrigerator, just in time for all the leftovers from Holiday Dinners. For dinner tonight I prepared Seasoned Fried Haddock w/ Macaroni and Cheese, Yellow Wax and Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread.

 

 

Haddock Mac Cheese 007

I had a Haddock Fillet in the freezer that I let thaw in the fridge overnight. To prepare it I rinsed the fillet in cold water and patted dry with a paper towel. Then sliced the fillet into four pieces. I then seasoned it with just a bit of Sea Salt and put the pieces in a Hefty Zip Plastic Bag where I then added Zatarain’s Lemon Pepper Breading Mix. Shook until all the pieces were well coated. I then pan fried them in Canola Oil, frying them about 3 minutes per side until golden brown. Haddock and Zatarain’s is a perfect combo, delicious every time!

 

 

 

I had been craving some more Macaroni and Cheese since the last time I had some. So for a side I heated up an individual cup of Bob Evan’s Macaroni and Cheese. Just microwave for 1 1/2 minutes and you have your Mac and Cheese, and quite good Mac and Cheese I might add. I also had bought a package of Kroger Private Selection Harvest Whole Yellow Wax and Green Beans, it was on sale and thought I would give it a try. It comes in a microwavable bag but I prepared by the other cooking option, boiling in water for 5-6 minutes. They were easy to prepare and not too bad for a frozen bean, I’ll use it again sometime. I also had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later tonight some Pringles Fat Free Potato Chips with Hidden Valley Smoked Bacon Ranch Dip.

 

 

 

 

Bob Evans Macaroni & Cheese Tasteful Sides Singles:Bob evans Mac

* Farm-fresh goodness
* Made with real cheddar cheese
* Microwaveable
* Ready to heat and eat
* 2 single servings

 

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 170 G
Servings Per Container 2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 220Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 10 G 16
Saturated Fat 5 G
24
Trans Fat 0 G
Cholesterol 25 Mg 8
Sodium 810 Mg 34
Total Carbohydrate 22 G 7
Dietary Fiber 1 G
6
Sugars 3 G
Protein 10 G

Lemon – Pepper Fried Haddock w/ Baked Bay Scallops and Mac and Cheese

October 30, 2013 at 5:22 PM | Posted in Bob Evan's, fish, Sea Salt, seafood | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Lemon – Pepper Fried Haddock w/ Baked Bay Scallops and Mac and Cheese

 

 

Haddock  and Bay Shrimp 004
A cloudy and dreary day out today, a bit warmer but damp. It looks like it’s going to be a stormy Trick or Treat Night tomorrow also they say. Growing up in the neighborhood, in Hamilton, we always looked forward to Halloween Night and all the Candy! Back then we would fill up 2 huge Trick or Treat Bags easily during the course of the night, as all the houses were close together so it was easy to canvas a couple of neighborhoods. For dinner tonight, Lemon – Pepper Fried Haddock w/ Baked Bay Scallops and Mac and Cheese.

 

 
It was Seafood tonight with some Mac and Cheese thrown in. I had bought a Haddock Fillet at Kroger the day before along with the Bay Scallops. I still buy Seafood from Kroger it’s one item that’s reasonably priced, and very good quality. To prepare the Haddock I started by rinsing the Fillet off with cold water and patted it dry with a paper towel. I then sliced the Fillet into smaller pieces. To season I added a couple of shakes of Sea Salt and then rolled the Fillets in Zatarain’s Lemon Pepper Breading Mix. I pan fried them in Canola Oil about 3 1/2 minutes per side until golden brown. I could live on Fish and Seafood!

 

 
Then for my Bay Scallops. Rinsed them off and patted them dry and then I combined the following; ½ cup Progresso Italian Style Bread Crumbs, 1 Tsp. Onion Powder, 1 Tsp. Garlic Powder, ½ Tsp. Paprika, 1/2 Tsp. Parsley (dried), ¼ Tsp. Cayenne Pepper, ¼ cup Parmesan Cheese, grated, and Dash Sea Salt. Then I melted 2 Tbsp. Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter. Preheated the oven to 400 degrees F and poured the melted butter into a 2-quart casserole dish. Make sure the scallops and butter are evenly placed in the bottom of the dish. Mix all the remaining ingredients well and sprinkle over the scallops. Bake until the scallops are firm, which will take about 20 minutes, careful not overcook the Scallops. These are nothing but delicious! The seasoning along with the Bread Crumbs gives them excellent flavor and a nice brown crust. I also heated up some Bob Evan’s Macaroni and Cheese. Just microwave and their ready. A mini Seafood Fest tonight for dinner! For dessert later a Del Monte No Sugar Added Peach Chunks Cup.

 

 
Baked Bay Scallops:

Ingredients:

2 Tbsp. Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter, melted
1 ½ pounds Bay Scallops, rinsed and drained
½ cup Progresso Italian Style Bread Crumbs
1 Tsp. Onion Powder
1 Tsp. Garlic Powder
½ Tsp. Paprika
1/2 Tsp. Parsley, dried
¼ Tsp. Cayenne Pepper
¼ cup Parmesan Cheese, grated
Dash Sea Salt

Directions:

Total prep and cook time: 45 minutes
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F or 200 degrees C. Pour the melted butter into a 2-quart casserole dish. Make sure the scallops and butter are evenly placed in the bottom of the dish. Mix all the remaining ingredients well and sprinkle over the scallops. Bake until the scallops are firm, which will take about 20 minutes.

Red Snapper Fish Sandwich w/ Tofu Mac & Cheese

November 6, 2012 at 6:26 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's, cheese, diabetes, diabetes friendly, fish, low calorie, low carb, tofu | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Red Snapper Fish Sandwich w/ Tofu Mac & Cheese

 
A comfort food classic, with a bit of a spin, for dinner tonight. It’s a Fish sandwich with Mac and Cheese! I love Mac & Cheese but I don’t like the calories and carbs that usually come with it. So to cut back on the calories and carbs I replaced the Pasta Macaroni with Tofu Shiratki (Yam Noodle with Tofu) Macaroni Shape Noodles.

 

I used a Red Snapper Fillet for my Fish. After rinsing the fillet off with water I patted the fillet dry with a paper towel. I then seasoned it with Sea Salt, Black Pepper, and Garlic Salt. Then rolled it in Progresso Italian Style Bread Crumbs. I pan fried it in Canola Oil about 3 minutes per side. Came out with a beautiful golden brown crust and moist and delicious! Served it on an Aunt Millie’s Deli Style Whole Wheat Mini Sub Bun and topped with a slice of Borden Smoked Cheddar.

 

Now for the Mac & Cheese, this is where it gets good! I used TOFU SHIRATAKI (Yam Noodle with Tofu) MACARONI SHAPE which is only 20 calories and 3 carbs! I added a half a serving of Velveeta 2% Cheese, and a Tablespoon Kraft Shredded Parmesan Cheese. Seasoned with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper. Mix it all together and microwave on high for 1 minute and 40 seconds. After the first minute stop it to stir and continue with 40 seconds, the time can vary according to your microwave. I’m starting to use Tofu more and more as a noodle substitute. Huge difference in calories and carbs between the two. A thank you to Hungry Girl for the idea. I left the recipe and the link to the Housefoods Tofu at the end of the post. For dessert later a bowl of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream topped with Bob Evan’s Glazed Apples.

 

 

Cheesy Tofu Shirataki Mac

Ingredients:
1 Bag House Foods Tofu Shirataki Macaroni Shaped Noodle Substitute
1/2 Serving Velveeta 2% Cheese
1 Tablespoon Kraft Shredded Parmesan
Sea Salt and Black Pepper, to taste
Sprinkle of Oscar Mayer Real Turkey Bacon Bits (Optional)

Directions:
Use a strainer to rinse and drain noodles well. Pat dry. In a microwave-safe bowl, microwave noodles for 1 minute.

*Drain excess liquid. Dry thoroughly with paper towels.

*Add Noodles back to bowl and add Velveeta and Cheese slice to Noodles breaking both into pieces as you add them. Microwave for 1 minute. Stop and stir, mixing well, and continue to microwave for an additional 40 seconds. Optional, sprinkle extra Shredded Parm Cheese and Turkey Bacon Bits on top before serving.

MAKES 1 SERVING

 
House Tofu Shirataki – TOFU SHIRATAKI (Yam Noodle with Tofu) MACARONI SHAPE 8oz.

 

Tofu Shirataki is a great pasta alternative made from blending the root of the Konnyaku – a member of the yam family and tofu.
It is a healthy, uniquely textured noodle – that pleases people of all ages!

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 113g / 4.0oz
Servings per Container: 2
Per Serving
Calories 20
Fat Calories 5
Per Serving %DV
Total Fat – 0.5g 1%
Sat. Fat 0g 0%
Trans Fat 0g %
Cholesterol – 0mg 0%
Sodium – 15mg 1%
Total Carb. – 3g 1%
Fiber Less Than 2g 9%
Sugars 0g

 

http://www.house-foods.com/tofu/tofu_shirataki.aspx

Gorton’s Classic Grilled Shrimp w/ Smart One’s Three Cheese Macaroni

July 25, 2012 at 5:12 PM | Posted in baking, pasta, seafood, shrimp | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Gorton’s Classic Grilled Shrimp w/ Smart One’s Three Cheese Macaroni
Well I don’t think you can make an easier meal than this! I had Gorton’s Classic Grilled Shrimp w/ Smart One’s Macaroni & Cheese. To prepare the Gorton’s Shrimp preheat the oven to 425 degrees and bake for 10 – 11 minutes. That should be your only pan to clean also, a big plus! While the Shrimp is baking you can prepare the Smart One’s Mac & Cheeese. Just peel back the corner of the plastic covering and microwave on high for 2 minutes. Remove and stir the Mac and Cheese, recover and microwave for an addtional 1 minute. It comes in a microwavable plate so you can top with your Shrimp and enjoy dinner! The carbs are a bit high on the Mac & Cheese so I only had a half serving, I saved the other half for lunch tomorrow. These 2 make a great combination for an easy hearty meal. For dessert tonight a bowl of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream topped with some fresh Blueberries.
Gorton’s Classic Grilled Shrimp
Gorton’s Premium Shrimp items are made with the highest quality shrimp that are prepared in a variety of ways including marinated and flame-grilled, simmered in delectable sauces, or covered flavorful crunchy breading or light crispy batter. No matter the style, the preparation is quick and easy and the taste is absolutely delicious! Try all of our varieties!

Grilled Shrimp Classic
Large, tail-on shrimp
Flame-grilled for the authentic taste of outdoor grilling
Marinated with real herbs and spices for a delicious flavor
Cooks in under 15 minutes on stovetop, in oven or microwave
Only 110 calories and 1.5g of fat per serving
Serve on its own, over rice or pasta, or on a salad

Why we love it: Not only does Gorton’s make high-quality, mouthwatering seafood, but the company also makes a commitment to seafood sustainability. They purchase from environmentally responsible companies, work with suppliers to encourage traceability, and advocate with conservation organizations. We like the taste of that!

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 8 pieces (4oz)

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 15Calories 110

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 3g 5%
Saturated Fat
Cholesterol 105mg 35%
Sodium 680mg 28%
Potassium 150mg
Total Carbohydrate 5g 2%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Sugars 2g
Protein 16g

Smart One’s Three Cheese Macaroni

Three Cheese Macaroni
Elbow Macaroni blended with cheddar, asiago and romano cheeses.
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 package (255g)

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 50Calories 300

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 6g 9%
Saturated Fat 2.5g 12%
Polyunsaturated Fat 1.5g
Monounsaturated Fat 1.5g
Cholesterol 10mg 3%
Sodium 570mg 24%
Total Carbohydrate 48g 16%
Dietary Fiber 3g 12%
Sugars 3g
Protein 14g

Vitamin A 2% Vitamin C 6%
Calcium 15% Iron 10%

One of America’s Favorites – Macaroni and Cheese

June 11, 2012 at 8:34 AM | Posted in cheese, Food, pasta | Leave a comment
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Macaroni and cheese, also known as “mac and cheese”, “macaroni cheese” in Australian English, British English & New Zealand English

A side dish of macaroni and cheese

or “macaroni pie” in Caribbean English, is a dish consisting of cooked elbow macaroni and cheese sauce.
Macaroni and cheese is a casserole, but “macaroni and cheese” often refers to the popular packaged dry macaroni and cheese mix pioneered by Kraft Dinner in 1937 and widely copied.
The dish is essentially a noodle gratin (scalloped potatoes) with macaroni pasta in place of potatoes.

A similar traditional dish in Switzerland is called Älplermagronen (Alpine herder’s macaroni), which is also available in boxed versions. Älplermagronen are made of macaroni, cream, cheese, roasted onions, and potatoes. In the Canton of Uri, the potatoes are traditionally omitted, and in some regions, bacon or ham is added.

Macaroni (“Maccheroni” in Italian) is mentioned in various medieval Italian sources, though it is not always clear whether it is a pasta shape or a prepared dish. However, pasta and cheese casseroles have been recorded in cookbooks as early as the Liber de Coquina, one of the oldest medieval cookbooks. A cheese and pasta casserole known as makerouns was recorded in an English cookbook in the 14th century. It was made with fresh, hand-cut pasta which was sandwiched between a mixture of melted butter and cheese. It was considered an upperclass dish even in Italy until around the 18th century.
“Maccaroni” with various sauces was a fashionable food in late eighteenth century Paris. The future American president Thomas Jefferson encountered the pasta in both Paris and in northern Italy. He drew a sketch of the pasta and wrote detailed notes on the extrusion process. In 1793, he commissioned American ambassador to Paris, William Short, to purchase a machine for making it. Evidently, the machine was not suitable, as Jefferson later imported both macaroni and Parmesan cheese for his use in Monticello. In 1802, Jefferson served a “macaroni pie” at a state dinner.
Since that time, the dish has been associated with America and especially the American South. A recipe called “macaroni and cheese” appeared in the 1824 cookbook “The Virginia Housewife” written by Mary Randolph, Jefferson’s cousin. Randolph’s recipe had three ingredients: macaroni, cheese, and butter, layered together and baked in a 400-degree F. oven. The cookbook was the most influential cookbook of the 19th century, according to culinary historian Karen Hess. Similar recipes for macaroni and cheese occur in the 1852 Hand-book of Useful Arts, and the 1861 Godey’s Lady’s Book. By the mid 1880’s, cookbooks as far west as Kansas included recipes for macaroni-based casseroles.

Pasta was however, still made by hand – a laborious process that often exploited slave labor and servants. Randolph’s cookbook addressed housewives in comfortable circumstances.[6] Cooking was done in kitchens kept in a separate building for reasons of safety and summer heat. At its heart was a large fireplace where cauldrons of water and broth simmered during most of the day. A brick oven used for baking was located next to the fireplace. Although the first American pasta “factory” opened in Philadelphia in 1798, most pasta factories emerged with the rapid American industrialization following the American Civil War. Crucial was the development in 1878 of the Marseilles Purifier – a device to improve semolina, the first hydraulic press in 1882, and the first steam powered mill in 1884. Also important in these developments were the influx of Italian immigrants increasing the demand in America for pasta. High class Americans would still purchase imported pasta for the snob appeal. In 1914, an artificial drying process drastically lowered prices of factory pasta. The First World War brought pasta imports to a halt, creating an opportunity for American factories. The number of pasta factories rose from 373 to 575 between 1914 and 1919.
Paralleling this was the introduction of cheesemaking factories. The first American cheesemaking factory was founded by Jesse Williams in 1851. Generic factory cheese, cheddar, became so common it was called “store cheese” or “yellow cheese.” The earlier recipes cited by Randolph probably used harder cheeses such as Parmesan. These economies of scale were driven both by the move of the population to the cities and the efficiencies of the railroad.

With the lowering of price of the factory-produced product, macaroni, and thus macaroni and cheese, lost its cachet. Fashionable restaurants in New York — even Italian ones — did not serve it. Food science, a new discipline from the 1890s, proclaimed fruits and vegetables were of little nutritional value and cost too much based on bread. In the 1920s, the millers promoted macaroni as “the divine food” and sponsored “eat more wheat” campaigns. It was at this time the practice of serving Swedish meatballs with buttered egg noodles emerged.
Boston Market, a ready to eat take-out, and Michelina’s and Stouffer’s, frozen food, are some of the more widespread brands of macaroni and cheese available in the United States. The dish still retains its Southern associations and is a common side at barbecue and soul food restaurants, but it has long held its place in higher end Southern establishments and working class cafeterias. Additional novelties include deep-fried mac and cheese found at fairs and mobile vendors (food carts). A precooked version known as “macaroni and cheese loaf” can be found in some stores.

Since the 1990s various “gourmet” mac and cheese dishes have emerged in fine “non-regional” North American restaurants. Since 2005 a number of restaurants operating on a fast-food model — but serving only macaroni and cheese — have opened in places such as New York City, Oakland, Portland, St. Louis, Manchester and Vancouver, Canada.

Packaged versions of the dish are available as a boxed convenience food, consisting of uncooked pasta and either a liquid cheese sauce

Kraft Mac and Cheese

or powdered ingredients to prepare it. The powdered cheese sauce is mixed with either milk or water, and margarine, butter, or olive oil. In preparing the dish, the macaroni is cooked and drained, then mixed with the cheese sauce. These products are prepared in a microwave, in a stove pot, or baked in a oven, often with any of the extra ingredients mentioned above.
A number of different products on the market use this basic formulation with minor variations in ingredients.
Kraft Dinner was introduced as a packaged mix in 1937 with the slogan “make a meal for four in nine minutes.” It was an immediate success in the US and Canada amidst the economic turmoil of the depression. During the Second World War, rationing of meat and dairy products lead to Kraft’s wide popularity. During this time it also became an acceptable entree rather than a side dish. Wartime popularity of the Kraft product lead to common variations of the dish made with processed cheese in the postwar era. The 1953 Better Homes and Gardens Cookbook includes a recipe for the dish with Velveeta, which had been reformulated in that year.
In Canada, the Kraft product is so popular that “Kraft Dinner” has become a generic trademark of sorts. The item is Canada’s number one selling grocery item and has assumed an iconic status akin to Vegemite in Australia, but is also stereotyped as a food staple for students and those in lower income levels.

In the United States, July 7 has been named National Macaroni Day; July 14 National Macaroni and Cheese Day and National Macaroni Day; and June 4 National Cheese Day.

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