Ohio Festivals September 5-8, 2019

September 3, 2019 at 2:12 PM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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September 5-7, 2019 Marion Popcorn Festival – Marion, Ohio
Marion County is one of the top popcorn producing counties in the world. Festival has top name entertainment, golf & bowling tournaments, porpcorn cooking contest, and the Orville Redenbacher Parade. Visit the popcorn museum while you’re in town. Attendance: 250,000+
http://www.popcornfestival.com/

September 6-7, 2019 Lithopolis Honeyfest – Lithopolis, Ohio
Enjoy a fascinating day of unique attractions – honey bee beards; honey in a variety of flavors, colors and textures; and an array of products direct from the hive. Watch honey being extracted from the comb and the State Apiarist demonstrate a hive inspection. Meet the American Honey Princess, Ohio beekeepers and explore beekeeping equipment hands-on. See a real queen bee and her colony up close under the glass of an observation hive. Buzz over to the food court for scrumptious honey-made food and sample mead at the wine tasting tent. Grab a honey brew at the beer garden and enjoy a treat from the Honey Bake-Off sale. Live music on two stages, arts & crafts, and watch the kids have fun creating their own crafts at The Gilmore Group’s Busy Beehive.
http://www.lithopolishoneyfest.com/

September 6-8, 2019 Italian Fall Festa – Kettering, Ohio
A weekend of great Italian food, wonderful Italian music, good friends, and a fun game of Bocce on the beautiful, spacious, shaded grounds of Bella Villa! Dinners, Meatball Madness 5K and spaghetti eating contest.
http://www.italianfallfesta.com/

September 6-8, 2019 46th Annual Mantua Potato Festival
Mantua, Ohio
Join us for the annual Mantua Potato Festival. We will have many activities, contests and exhibits planned throughout the weekend. We are also looking for volunteers and committee members. Thank you to all that have supported us in the past, and we look forward to seeing you all at the Festival!
http://www.mantuapotatofestival.org/

September 6-8, 2019
Clinton County Corn Festival
Wilmington, Ohio
A family fun event held the weekend after Labor Day every year! Started in 1977 by the Antique Power Club. It is held at the Clinton County Fairgrounds in Wilmington, Ohio. We feature many activates for all ages! Whether you come for the continuous entertainment on our sound stage, games in our special events area, various tractor and antique displays, crafts and antiques, or THE FOOD it is sure you’re going to have a blast!!
http://www.cornfestivalonline.com/

Ohio Festivals July 12-15, 2018

July 11, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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A lot of festivals this week!

July 12-14, 2018
Annual Italian American Festival
Akron, Ohio
Sponsored by the Italian-American Council, the festival will offer food, contests, music, fireworks and more. Attendance: 50,000.
http://it-am.org/

July 12-15, 2018
69th Annual Miami Valley Steam Threshers Show
Plain City, Ohio
Demonstrations of steam engines, antique tractors, gas engines, saw, shingle and veneer milling, drag saw, baling, prony brake, draft horses, threshing, and operating blacksmith shop. There will also be flea markets, arts, crafts, food, model engines, entertainment, tractor pulls and a large parade.
https://www.mvsteam.com/

July 13-14, 2018 Ohio Veterans 12th Annual BBQ Cook-off
Kettering, Ohio
The annual Kansas City BBQ Society sanctioned event is presented by American Legion Post 598 of Kettering. Watch professional BBQ teams vie for the championship trophy and share in a purse of $6,000! Live Band.
http://www.ohioveteransbbq.com/

July 13-15, 2018 Delta Chicken Festival – Delta, Ohio
Enjoy chicken dinners, a midway, elephant rides, entertainment, pageant, Chicken Run, pancake breakfast, volleyball and dodgeball tournaments, and a parade.
https://sites.google.com/view/deltachickenfestival/

July 13-21, 2018 13th Ohio Brew Week Festival – Athens, Ohio
Ohio Brew Week celebrates Ohio’s diverse microbrews during the weeklong festival. You can enjoy more than 200 craft beers from 40 Ohio microbreweries. Events include craft brew cooking competiton, Brew BQ Cookoff, homebrew competition, and Boogie on the Bricks.
https://ohiobrewweek.com/

July 14, 2018 India Food Fair
Macedonia, Ohio
An Indian Food and cultural extravaganza. Come and experience mouth watering Indian cuisine, music, dance and a host of games and entertainment. If you are looking for a fun-filled evening for your whole family, you will not be disappointed. The event will have free entry and free parking! Time: 1:00 pm – 8:00 pm.
https://www.indiafoodfaircleveland.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Pesto

December 16, 2013 at 9:31 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Pesto alla genovese is made from basil leaves..

Pesto alla genovese is made from basil leaves..

 

 

Pesto (Italian pronunciation: [ˈpesto], Genoese: [ˈpestu]) is a sauce originating in Genoa in the Liguria region of northern Italy (pesto genovese), and traditionally consists of crushed garlic, basil, and European pine nuts blended with olive oil, Parmigiano Reggiano (Parmesan cheese), and Fiore Sardo (cheese made from sheep’s milk). The name is the contracted past participle of the Genoese word pestâ (Italian: pestare), which means to pound, to crush, in reference to the original method of preparation, with marble mortar and wooden pestle. The ingredients in a traditionally made pesto are ground with a circular motion of the pestle in the mortar. This same Latin root through Old French also gave rise to the English word pestle.

 

 

...and pine nuts...

…and pine nuts…

 

The ancient Romans ate a paste called moretum, which was made by crushing cheese, garlic and herbs together. Basil, the main ingredient of modern pesto, likely originated in India and was first domesticated there. Basil took the firmest root in the regions of Liguria, Italy and Provence, France. The Ligurians around Genoa took the dish and adapted it, using a combination of basil, crushed garlic, grated hard cheese (a mix of parmigiano-reggiano and pecorino or just one of the two), and pine nuts with a little olive oil to form pesto. The first mention of recipe for pesto as it is known today, is from the book La Cuciniera Genovese written in 1863 by Giovanni Battista Ratto. In French Provence, the dish evolved into the modern pistou, a combination of basil, parsley, crushed garlic, and grated cheese (optional). Pine nuts are not included.

 

... which are ground up with the other ingredients.

… which are ground up with the other ingredients.

 

In 1944, The New York Times mentioned an imported canned pesto paste. In 1946, Sunset magazine published a pesto recipe by Angelo Pellegrini. Pesto did not become popular in North America until the 1980s and 1990s.

Pesto is traditionally prepared in a marble mortar with a wooden pestle. First, garlic and pine nuts are placed in the mortar and reduced to a cream, then the washed and dried basil leaves are added with coarse salt and ground to a creamy consistency. Only then is a mix of Parmigiano-Reggiano and Pecorino added. To help incorporate the cheese a little extra-virgin olive oil is added. In a tight jar (or simply in an air-tight plastic container), covered by a layer of extra-virgin olive oil, pesto can last in the refrigerator up to a week, and can be frozen for later use.

 

 

 
Pesto is commonly used on pasta, traditionally with Mandilli de Sæa (Genovese dialect – literally “silk handkerchiefs”), trofie or trenette. Potatoes and little green beans are also traditionally added to the dish, boiled in the same pot in which the pasta has been cooked. It is sometimes used in minestrone. Pesto is sometimes served on sliced beef tomatoes and sliced boiled potatoes.

"Fettuccine with Pesto alla genovese"

“Fettuccine with Pesto alla genovese”

Because pesto is a generic term for anything that is made by pounding, there are various other pestos, some traditional, some modern. Pesto alla genovese is made with Genovese basil, salt, garlic, Ligurian extra virgin olive oil (Taggiasco), European pine nuts (sometimes toasted) and a grated cheese like Parmigiano Reggiano or Grana Padano and pecorino Sardo or pecorino romano.
A slightly different version of the sauce exists in Provence, where it is known as pistou. In contrast with pesto genovese, pistou is, in general, made with olive oil, basil, and garlic only: While cheese may be added, usually in a traditional pesto no nuts are included because no pine trees grow in there to provide the nuts. Pistou is used in the typical soupe au pistou, a hearty vegetable soup with pistou flavour. The sauce did not originally contain basil, however. Instead, cheese and olive oil were the main constituents.
Sometimes almonds are used instead of pine nuts, and sometimes mint leaves are mixed in with the basil leaves.
Pesto alla siciliana, sometimes called pesto rosso (red pesto), is a sauce from Sicily similar to pesto genovese but with the addition of tomato, almonds instead of pine nuts, and much less basil. Pesto alla calabrese is a sauce from Calabria consisting of (grilled) bell peppers, black pepper and more; these ingredients give it a distinctively spicy taste.
Outside Italy, the household name “pesto” has been used for all sorts of cold sauces or dips, mostly without any of the original ingredients: arugula (instead of or in addition to basil), black olives, lemon peel, coriander, or mushrooms. A German variety uses ramson leaves instead of basil. In the 19th century, Genovese immigrants to Argentina brought pesto recipes with them. A Peruvian variety, known as “tallarines verdes” (meaning green noodles, from Italian tagliarini), is slightly creamier, lacks pine nuts (because of their rarity and prohibitive cost in Peru), may use spinach and vegetable oil (in place of olive oil), and is sometimes served with roasted potatoes and sirloin steak.
In Singapore, an Italian-Peranakan fusion version called laksa pesto is popular. The recipe has the flavour of the local curry noodle soup, laksa but is made using the pesto method.
Vegan variations of pesto can include mixes of fresh basil, nuts such as walnut or pine nut, olive oil, and the addition of miso paste and nutritional yeast to provide additional flavor enhancement to the dish.

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Cacciatore with Polenta

September 11, 2013 at 9:19 AM | Posted in bison, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Buffalo gone Italian! Wild Idea’s Jill O’Brien has another delicious sounding recipe, Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Buffalo Cacciatore with Polenta. I’m adding this one to my list of “Must Make Dishes“.

 

 

Buffalo Cacciatore with PolentaWild Idea Buffalo Buffalo Cacciatore with Polenta
By: Jill O’Brien

 

 

This recipe was inspired by my friend Maria’s grandmother, Gelsomina. I have stayed true to Gelsomina’s seasonings, and have substituted only those ingredients that I felt she would have approved of (wine instead of water and fresh tomatoes for tomato paste), and of course buffalo in place of chicken.

Ingredients:

 

* 1 – 3 lb. buffalo roast cut into steaks or 3 lb. Stew Meat
* 2 – Tbl. olive oil
* 1 – Tbl. Italian seasoning
* 1 – tsp. paprika
* ¼ – tsp. allspice
* ¼ – tsp. cinnamon
* 1 – tsp. salt
* 1 – tsp. black pepper
* 1 – onion, diced
* 3 – cloves garlic, chopped
* 2 – cups white wine
* 4 – ripe tomatoes, peeled and chopped, plus juice
* 2 – Tbl. ketchup (or tomato paste)
Instructions:
1 – Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees
2 – Rinse meat and blot dry.
3 – Mix all dry spices together and rub into meat.
4 – Over medium high heat, heat oil in heavy sauté pan and brown meat. You may need to do this in two batches.
5 – Place browned meat in heavy casserole dish.
6 – Add onion and garlic to sauté pan and sauté for 4 minutes.
7 – Deglaze pan with wine, and add tomatoes and ketchup or paste. Bring to a boil.
8 – Pour tomato sauce over meat and cover casserole dish. Place in hot oven and braise for 1.5 hours. Check for tenderness and continue braising if needed.
9 -Prepare polenta as directed.
10 –Spoon polenta on serving platter and top with Buffalo Cacciatore.

 

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/buffalo-cacciatore-with-polenta/

 

 

 
Wild idea Buffalo Stew Meat – 2 LbWild Idea Buffalo Stew Meat
Flavorful, healthy and incredibly easily. Pre-cut from our buffalo roasts, the ready to use stew meat is super convenient! Great for soups, stews, or stroganoff. 2 lb. Package (Also available in 1 lb. pack)

 
http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/collections/a-la-carte/products/2-lb-stew-meat

September 6-8, 2013 Italian Fall Festa – Kettering, Ohio

September 4, 2013 at 9:07 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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September 6-8, 2013 Italian Fall Festa – Kettering, OhioItalian Fall Fest
A weekend of great Italian food, wonderful Italian music, good friends, and a fun game of Bocce on the beautiful, spacious, shaded grounds of Bella Villa! Dinners, Meatball Madness 5K and spaghetti eating contest.

 
Benvenuti! – Welcome!!
Join us for our Annual Italian Fall Festa!
A weekend of wonderful Italian music, great Italian food, good friends, and a fun game of Bocce on the beautiful, spacious, shaded grounds of Bella Villa!

 
http://www.italianfallfesta.com/

Cheese of the Week – Parmesan

September 27, 2012 at 9:34 AM | Posted in cheese, cooking, Food | 2 Comments
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Parmesan cheese is the name of a few kinds of Italian extra-hard cheeses. It is usually the cheese to go with Spaghetti and other typical

Parmesan cheese (Parmigiano Reggiano)

Italian pasta, but it also has many other uses. Parmesan is a part of Italian national cuisine and is usually grated.
Usually, Parmesan cheese is either Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano cheese. Both cheeses are AOC. This means that the way they are made, and the region they come from are strictly regulated.
Only these brands (Parmigiano Reggiano, Grana Padano) are protected. In many parts of the world, cheese is sold as Parmesan cheese that has nothing to do with the true (Italian) Parmigiano Reggiano or Grana Padano. The biggest producers of such cheeses are the United States and Argentina.
The original Parmesan cheese is one of the most expensive cheeses in the world.

 
Parmigiano-Reggiano

Country of origin Italy
Region, town Provinces of Parma,
Reggio Emilia, Modena,
Bologna (west of the Reno),
Mantua (south of the Po River)
Source of milk Cows
Pasteurised No
Texture Hard
Aging time Minimum: 12 months
Vecchio: 18–24 months
Stravecchio: 24–36 months
Certification Italy: DOP 1955
EU: PDO 1992

Parmigiano-Reggiano also known in English as Parmesan is a hard, granular cheese, cooked but not pressed, named after the producing areas near Parma, Reggio Emilia, Modena, and Bologna (all in Emilia-Romagna), and Mantova (in Lombardia), Italy. Under Italian law, only cheese produced in these provinces may be labelled “Parmigiano-Reggiano”, while European law classifies the name as a protected designation of origin.
Parmigiano is the Italian adjective for Parma. Reggiano is the Italian adjective for Reggio Emilia. Parmesan is the French name for it and also serves as the informal term for the cheese in the English language. The name Parmesan is also used for cheeses which imitate Parmigiano-Reggiano, with phrases such as “Italian hard cheese” adopted to skirt legal constraints. The closest legitimate Italian cheese to Parmigiano-Reggiano is Grana Padano.

Parmigiano-Reggiano is made from raw cow’s milk. The whole milk of the morning milking is mixed with the naturally skimmed milk (it

Parmigiano-Reggiano factory

is left in large shallow tanks to allow the cream to separate) of the previous evening’s milking, resulting in a part skim mixture. The milk is pumped into copper-lined vats (copper heats and cools quickly). Starter whey is added, and the temperature is raised to 33–35 °C (91–95 °F). Calf rennet is added, and the mixture is left to curdle for 10–12 minutes. The curd is then broken up mechanically into small pieces (around the size of rice grains). The temperature is then raised to 55 °C (131 °F) with careful control by the cheese-maker. The curd is left to settle for 45–60 minutes. The compacted curd is collected in a piece of muslin before being divided in two and placed in molds. There is 1100 L (291 US gallons or 250 imperial gallons) of milk per vat, producing two cheeses each. The curd making up each wheel at this point weighs around 45 kg (100 lb). The remaining whey in the vat was traditionally used to feed the pigs from which “Prosciutto di Parma” (cured Parma ham) was produced. The barns for these animals were usually just a few yards away from the cheese production rooms.
The cheese is put into a stainless steel, round form that is pulled tight with a spring-powered buckle so the cheese retains its wheel shape. After a day or two, the buckle is released and a plastic belt imprinted numerous times with the Parmigiano-Reggiano name, the plant’s number, and month and year of production is put around the cheese and the metal form is buckled tight again. The imprints take hold on the rind of the cheese in about a day and the wheel is then put into a brine bath to absorb salt for 20–25 days. After brining, the wheels are then transferred to the aging rooms in the plant for 12 months. Each cheese is placed on wooden shelves that can be 24 cheeses high by 90 cheeses long or about 4,000 total wheels per aisle. Each cheese and the shelf underneath it is then cleaned manually or robotically every seven days. The cheese is also turned at this time.

At 12 months, the Consorzio Parmigiano-Reggiano inspects each and every cheese. The cheese is tested by a master grader whose only instruments are a hammer and his ear. By tapping the wheel at various points, he can identify undesirable cracks and voids within the wheel. Those cheeses that pass the test are then heat branded on the rind with the Consorzio’s logo. Those that do not pass the test used to have their rinds marked with lines or crosses all the way around to inform consumers that they are not getting top-quality Parmigiano-Reggiano; more recent practices simply have these lesser rinds stripped of all markings.
Traditionally, cows have to be fed only on grass or hay, producing grass fed milk. Only natural whey culture is allowed as a starter, together with calf rennet.
The only additive allowed is salt, which the cheese absorbs while being submerged for 20 days in brine tanks saturated to near total salinity with Mediterranean sea salt. The product is aged an average of two years. The cheese is produced daily, and it can show a natural variability. True Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese has a sharp, complex fruity/nutty taste with a strong savory flavor and a slightly gritty texture. Inferior versions can impart a bitter taste.
The average Parmigiano-Reggiano wheel is about 18–24 centimeters (7.1–9.4 in) high, 40–45 centimeters (16–18 in) in diameter, and weighs 38 kilograms (84 lb).

Parmigiano-Reggiano is commonly grated over pasta dishes, stirred into soups and risottos, and eaten on its own. It is often shaved or grated over other dishes.
Slivers and chunks of the hardest parts of the crust are sometimes simmered in soup. They can also be just roasted and eaten as a snack.
The hollowed-out crust of a whole wheel of Parmigiano can be used as a serving pot for large groups.

One of America’s Favorites – Spaghetti

September 24, 2012 at 10:14 AM | Posted in pasta, spaghetti | Leave a comment
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Spaghetti is a long, thin, cylindrical pasta of Italian origin. Spaghetti is made of semolina or flour and water. Italian dried spaghetti is

Spaghetti hung to dry

made from durum wheat semolina, but outside of Italy it may be made with other kinds of flour. Traditionally, most spaghetti was 50 cm (20 in) long, but shorter lengths gained in popularity during the latter half of the 20th century and now spaghetti is most commonly available in 25–30 cm (10–12 in) lengths. A variety of pasta dishes are based on it, from spaghetti alla Carbonara or garlic and oil to a spaghetti with tomato sauce, meat and other sauces.

Spaghetti is the plural form of the Italian word spaghetto, which is a diminutive of spago, meaning “thin string” or “twine”.

Pasta in the West may first have been worked to long, thin forms in Southern Italy around the 12th century. The popularity of pasta spread to the whole of Italy after the establishment of pasta factories in the 19th century, enabling the mass production of pasta for the Italian market.

In the United States around the end of the 19th century, spaghetti was offered in restaurants as Spaghetti Italienne (which likely consisted of extremely soggy noodles and a tomato sauce diluted with broth) and it wasn’t until decades later that it came to be prepared with garlic or peppers. Canned spaghetti, kits for making spaghetti and spaghetti with meatballs became popular, and the dish has become a staple in the U.S.

Spaghetti is cooked in a large pot of salted, boiling water then drained in a colander (scolapasta in Italian).

In Italy, spaghetti is generally cooked al dente (Italian for to the tooth), just fully cooked and still firm. Outside Italy, spaghetti is sometimes cooked to a much softer consistency.

Spaghettoni is a thicker spaghetti which takes more time to cook. Spaghettini and vermicelli are very thin spaghetti (both of which may be called angel hair spaghetti in English) which take less time to cook.

An emblem of Italian cuisine, spaghetti is frequently served with tomato sauce, which may contain various herbs (especially oregano

Italian spaghetti and bread

and basil), olive oil, meat, or vegetables. Other spaghetti preparations include using Bolognese sauce, alfredo and carbonara. Grated hard cheeses, such as Pecorino Romano, Parmesan and Grana Padano, are often added. It is also sometimes served with chili.

Consumption of spaghetti in Italy doubled from 14 kilograms (30.9 lb) before World War II to 28 kilograms (61.7 lb) by 1955. By that year, Italy produced 1,432,990 tons of spaghetti, of which 74,000 was exported, and had a production capacity of 3 million tons.

The world record for largest bowl of spaghetti was set in March 2009 and reset in March 2010 when a Buca di Beppo restaurant in Garden Grove, California, successfully filled a swimming pool with more than 13,780 pounds (6,251 kg) of pasta.

Lean-O Cioppino

January 27, 2012 at 7:08 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, low calorie, low carb, seafood, shrimp | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Lean-O Cioppino w/ Sourdough Bread

When I seen this being made on Hungry Girl the other day it looked and sounded too good not to try! I went earlier today to stock up on the inredients and also picked up a loaf of freshly Sour Dough Bread, from the Kroger Bakery. It looked delicious but I had never heard of Cioppino so I looked it up and here’s what I found:

Cioppino is a fish stew originating in San Francisco. It is considered an Italian-American dish, and is related to various regional fish soups and stews of Italian cuisine. Cioppino is traditionally made from the catch of the day, which in the dish’s place of origin is typically a combination of dungeness crab, clams, shrimp, scallops, squid, mussels and fish. The seafood is then combined with fresh tomatoes in a wine sauce, and served with toasted bread, either sourdough or baguette. The dish is comparable to cacciucco and brodetto from Italy, as well as other fish dishes from the Mediterranean region such as bouillabaisse, burrida, and bourride of the French Provence, suquet de peix from Catalan speaking regions of coastal Spain.

This recipe from Hungrey Girl called for Clams and Shrimp. The recipe also called for Amy’s Organic Light In Sodium Chunky Tomato Bisque but they were out of stock of that so I went with a can of  Amy’s Organic Light In Sodium Cream of Tomato and when preparing it I added a half a can of Tomato Paste to it to thicken it up a bit. It’s very easy to make and every bit as delicious as it sounded! What a great combination to make a healthy and hearty Soup and it’s only 185 calories and 20 carbs. I topped it with some crumbled John Wm Macy’s Cheese Sticks and I had a side of Sour Dough Loaf Bread. This is a fantastic recipe, give it a try! I left the recipe along with the link to “Hungrey Girl” at the end of the post. For dessert later a 100 Calorie Breyer’s Ice Cream Bar.

Lean-O Cioppino

2011 Hungry Girl

Ingredients

Two 15-oz. cans reduced-sodium creamy tomato soup with 4g fat or less per serving (like the Light in Sodium version of Amy’s Chunky Tomato Bisque)

One 10-oz. can whole baby clams, drained
6 oz. (about 30) cooked ready-to-eat medium-small shrimp
1/4 tsp. dried oregano
2 tbsp. chopped fresh basil
Salt and black pepper, to taste
Optional garnish: fresh basil leaves

Directions

Place a nonstick pot on the stove, and set temperature to medium heat. Pour in the soup.

Add clams, shrimp, oregano, and basil. Stirring often, bring to desired heat, about 2 minutes.

If you like, season to taste with salt and pepper and garnish with basil leaves. Enjoy!
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
PER SERVING (1/4th of recipe, 1 generous cup): 185 calories, 3.5g fat, 885mg sodium, 20g carbs, 2g fiber, 13g sugars, 19g protein

http://www.hungry-girl.com/show/under-five-minutes-lean-o-cioppino-recipe

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