One of America’s (Irish) Favorites – Irish Stew

March 12, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Irish Stew

Irish stew (Irish: stobhach / Stobhach Gaelach) is any variety of meat-and-root vegetables stew native to Ireland. As in all traditional folk dishes, the exact recipe is not consistent from time or place to place. Common ingredients include lamb, or mutton (mutton is used as it comes from less tender sheep over a year old, is fattier, and has a stronger flavor, and was generally more common in less-affluent times) as well as potatoes, onions, and parsley. It may sometimes also include carrots. Irish stew is also made with kid goat.

 

“ Irish stew is a celebrated Irish dish, yet its composition is a matter of dispute. Purists maintain that the only acceptable and traditional ingredients are neck mutton chops or kid, potatoes, onions, and water. Others would add such items as carrots, turnips and pearl barley; but the purists maintain that they spoil the true flavor of the dish. The ingredients are boiled and simmered slowly for up to two hours. Mutton was the dominant ingredient because the economic importance of sheep lay in their wool and milk produce and this ensured that only old or economically non-viable animals ended up in the cooking pot, where they needed hours of slow cooking. Irish stew is the product of a culinary tradition that relied almost exclusively on cooking over an open fire. It seems that Irish stew was recognised as early as about 1800. ”

 

Stewing is an ancient method of cooking meats that is common throughout the world. However, the Celts did not possess their first bronze cauldrons, copied from Greek models, until the 7th century AD. After the idea of the cauldron was imported from Europe and/or Britain, the cauldron (along with the already established spit) became the dominant cooking tool in ancient Ireland, ovens being practically unknown to the ancient Gaels. The cauldron, along with flesh-hooks for suspending the meat, eventually became preferred over the spit for feasting purposes, as evidenced by archaeological findings that indicate a predominance of flesh hooks over roasting spits in Ireland and Britain (Cunliffe, Barry; “Britain Begins”; 2012). Many food historians believe that goat was originally the meat of choice, eventually being supplanted by beef and mutton.

 

The root vegetables and meat (originally goat) for the stew were then all in place, save for the potato. The introduction of the potato, originally a South American crop, did not occur until after the 16th century.

 

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One of America’s Favorites – Stew

March 2, 2015 at 6:38 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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A beef stew

A beef stew

A stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy. Ingredients in a stew can include any combination of vegetables (such as carrots, potatoes, beans, peppers and tomatoes, etc.), meat, especially tougher meats suitable for slow-cooking, such as beef. Poultry, sausages, and seafood are also used. While water can be used as the stew-cooking liquid, wine, stock, and beer are also common. Seasoning and flavourings may also be added. Stews are typically cooked at a relatively low temperature (simmered, not boiled), allowing flavors to mingle.

Stewing is suitable for the least tender cuts of meat that become tender and juicy with the slow moist heat method. This makes it popular in low-cost cooking. Cuts having a certain amount of marbling and gelatinous connective tissue give moist, juicy stews, while lean meat may easily become dry.

Stews may be thickened by reduction or with flour, either by coating pieces of meat with flour before searing, or by using a roux or beurre manié, a dough consisting of equal parts of butter and flour. Thickeners like cornstarch or arrowroot may also be used.

Stews are similar to soups, and in some cases there may not be a clear distinction between the two. Generally, stews have less liquid than soups, are much thicker and require longer cooking over low heat. While soups are almost always served in a bowl, stews may be thick enough to be served on a plate with the gravy as a sauce over the solid ingredients.

 

Irish stew

Irish stew

Stews have been made since ancient times. Herodotus says that the Scythians (8th to 4th centuries BC) “put the flesh into an animal’s paunch, mix water with it, and boil it like that over the bone fire. The bones burn very well, and the paunch easily contains all the meat once it has been stripped off. In this way an ox, or any other sacrificial beast, is ingeniously made to boil itself.”

Amazonian tribes used the shells of turtles as vessels, boiling the entrails of the turtle and various other ingredients in them. Other cultures used the shells of large mollusks (clams etc.) to boil foods in. There is archaeological evidence of these practices going back 8,000 years or more.

There are recipes for lamb stews and fish stews in the Roman cookery book Apicius, believed to date from the 4th century AD. Le Viandier, one of the oldest cookbooks in French, written by the French chef known as Taillevent, has ragouts or stews of various types in it.

Hungarian Goulash dates back to the 9th century Magyar shepherds of the area, before the existence of Hungary. Paprika was added in the 18th century.

The first written reference to ‘Irish stew’ is in Byron’s “The Devil’s Drive” (1814): “The Devil … dined on … a rebel or so in an Irish stew.”

 

In meat-based stews, white stews, also known as blanquettes or fricassées, are made with lamb or veal that is blanched, or lightly seared without browning, and cooked in stock. Brown stews are made with pieces of red meat that are first seared or browned, before a browned mirepoix, and sometimes browned flour, stock and wine are added.
* Partial list of Tyes of Stews:

Brunswick stew made with chicken

Brunswick stew made with chicken

* Beef Stroganoff, a stew with beef from Russia
* Bigos, a traditional stew in Polish cuisine;
* Birria, a goat stew from Mexico;
*Booyah, an American meat stew
* Brunswick stew, from Virginia and the Carolinas
*Burgoo, a Kentuckian stew
* Chicken stew, whole chicken and seasonings
* Chicken paprikash, chicken stew with paprika
* Chili con carne, Mexican-American meat and chili pepper stew
Cincinnati chili, chili developed by Greek immigrants in the Cincinnati area
* Crow stew, a sour cream-based stew made with crow meat, popular in the United States during the Great Depression
* Goulash, a Hungarian meat stew with paprika
* Gumbo, a Louisiana creole dish
* Irish stew, made with lamb or mutton, potato, onion and parsley

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Wild Idea Buffalo Irish Stew

February 5, 2014 at 9:14 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 1 Comment
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Irish Eyes are smiling with this week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Wild Idea Buffalo Irish Stew. Another good one from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo!

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Irish StewWild Idea Buffalo Buffalo Irish Stew
Colcannon Ingredients:

½ lb. cabbage or kale, sliced
¼ cup parsley sprigs
4 green onions, chopped
¼ cup hot milk
2 lbs. butter potatoes
3 tablespoons butter
¼ cup hot milk
½ teaspoon each salt and pepper
Vegetables Ingredients:

6 carrots, peeled and sliced
4 parsnips, peeled and sliced
4 leeks, halved and sliced
2 teaspoons olive oil
salt and pepper
Base ingredients for Stew:

1 – 3 lb. Chuck Roast, remove netting, rinsed and pat dry.
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon thyme
2 bay leaves
2 celery stalks
½ onion, chopped
1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved
2 bottles of Smithwick’s Beer
2 cups buffalo Stock or organic beef stock
½ cup red wine
1 tablespoon arrowroot
Colcannon Directions:

1 – Add cabbage to a pot of boiling water, reduce heat and simmer until tender. Add parsley and green onion and continue to simmer for two minutes.
2 – Drain water and place cabbage in blender with ¼ cup hot milk, salt and pepper. Puree.
Place potatoes in pot of boiling water and simmer, covered for 15 minutes. Drain all but 2 inches of water from the pot and continue to cook uncovered until water is gone or potatoes are tender.
3 – Pull skins of cooked potatoes. Place in a mixing bowl with butter and hot milk.
4 – Smash potatoes first and then mix with electric mixer until fluffy.
5 – Add cabbage puree and mix until just incorporated.
6 – Set aside or refrigerate until ready to serve. *I make this the night before and reheat in microwave before serving.

Vegetables Directions:

1 – Place vegetables on baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.
2 – Roast in 400* oven for 10 minutes. Vegetables should be firm, tender and slightly browned.
3 – Prep vegetables ahead of time and roast right before serving.

Stew: Directions:

1 – Place olive oil, garlic powder, salt, pepper and thyme in crockpot and mix together.
2 – Roll prepped roast in herbs in crockpot.
3 – Turn crockpot to high. Add bay leaf, celery, onion, tomatoes, beer and stock.
4 – Cook covered for 1 hour. Reduce heat to low and let cook for up to 8 hours.
5 – Remove roast from pot and place on cutting board. Using two forks, pull Buffalo roast apart into serving size pieces.
6 – Turn crockpot back to high, letting juices come to a boil.
7 – Mix red wine and arrow root together and whisk into juices. Adjust to your desired thickness, and season to taste.
8 – Return buffalo roast pieces back to crockpot.
To Plate:

In shallow soup bowl or pasta bowl, place a scoop of hot colcannon to edge of bowl. Place buffalo roast into side of colcannon. Ladle gravy in bowl, and add vegetable to gravy. Serve with crusty bread.

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2011/irish-stew/

One of America’s Favorites – Stew

November 5, 2012 at 10:45 AM | Posted in BEEF, carrots, chicken, cooking, Food, potatoes, vegetables | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy. Ingredients in a

A beef stew

stew can include any combination of vegetables (such as carrots, potatoes, beans, peppers and tomatoes, etc.), meat, especially tougher meats suitable for slow-cooking, such as beef. Poultry, sausages, and seafood are also used. While water can be used as the stew-cooking liquid, wine, stock, and beer are also common. Seasoning and flavorings may also be added. Stews are typically cooked at a relatively low temperature (simmered, not boiled), allowing flavors to mingle.
Stewing is suitable for the least tender cuts of meat that become tender and juicy with the slow moist heat method. This makes it popular in low-cost cooking. Cuts having a certain amount of marbling and gelatinous connective tissue give moist, juicy stews, while lean meat may easily become dry.
Stews may be thickened by reduction or with flour, either by coating pieces of meat with flour before searing, or by using a roux or beurre manié, a dough consisting of equal parts of butter and flour. Thickeners like cornstarch or arrowroot may also be used.
Stews are similar to soups, and in some cases there may not be a clear distinction between the two. Generally, stews have less liquid than soups, are much thicker and require longer cooking over low heat. While soups are almost always served in a bowl, stews may be thick enough to be served on a plate with the gravy as a sauce over the solid ingredients.

 

Stews have been made since ancient times. Herodotus says that the Scythians (8th to 4th centuries BC) “put the flesh into an animal’s

Lamb and Lentil Stew

paunch, mix water with it, and boil it like that over the bone fire. The bones burn very well, and the paunch easily contains all the meat once it has been stripped off. In this way an ox, or any other sacrificial beast, is ingeniously made to boil itself.”
Amazonian tribes used the shells of turtles as vessels, boiling the entrails of the turtle and various other ingredients in them. Other cultures used the shells of large mollusks (clams etc.) to boil foods in.[citation needed] There is archaeological evidence of these practices going back 8,000 years or more.
There are recipes for lamb stews and fish stews in the Roman cookery book Apicius, believed to date from the 4th century AD. Le Viandier, one of the oldest cookbooks in French, written by the French chef known as Taillevent, has ragouts or stews of various types in it.
Hungarian Goulash dates back to the 9th century Magyar shepherds of the area, before the existence of Hungary. Paprika was added in the 18th century.
The first written reference to ‘Irish stew‘ is in Byron’s “The Devil’s Drive” (1814): “The Devil … dined on … a rebel or so in an Irish stew.

 

In meat-based stews, white stews, also known as blanquettes or fricassées, are made with lamb or veal that is blanched, or lightly seared without browning, and cooked in stock. Brown stews are made with pieces of red meat that are first seared or browned, before a browned mirepoix, sometimes browned flour, stock and wine are added. These choices of stew are all unique to the individuals’ personal stew preference.

 

Examples of Stews:

 

*Baeckeoffe, a potato stew from Alsace;
*Barbacoa, a meat stew from Mexico;
*Beef Stroganoff, a stew with beef from Russia
*Bigos, a traditional stew in Polish cuisine;
*Birria, a goat stew from Mexico;
*Chicken stew, whole chicken and seasonings;
*Chicken paprikash, chicken stew with paprika;
*Chili con carne, Mexican meat and bean stew;
*Chili sin carne, a meatless American adaptation of the Mexican dish;
*Chilorio, a pork stew from Sinaloa, Mexico;

Goulash in a traditional “bogrács”

*Goulash, a Hungarian meat stew with paprika;
*Gumbo, a Louisiana creole dish;
*Hachee, a Dutch type of stew with wine or vinegar.
*Haleem, a Pakistani lentil and beef stew;
*Hasenpfeffer, a sour, marinated rabbit stew from Germany;
*Hayashi rice, a Japanese dish of beef, onions and mushrooms in red wine and demi-glace sauce, served with rice;
*Irish stew, made with lamb or mutton, potato, onion and parsley
*Pichelsteiner a traditional German stew
*Pörkölt, a Hungarian meat stew resembling goulash, flavored with paprika;
*Potjiekos, a South African stew;
*Pot au feu, a simple French stew;

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