Horseradish Turkey Burgers

April 5, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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I’m passing along another Jennie – O Turkey Burger recipe, Horseradish Turkey Burgers. This one is made using 2 Jennie – O products, JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast and JENNIE-O® Sweet Italian Turkey Sausage Links. Just remove the casing from the Sausages and mix it with the Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast and you have the makings of one delicious Burger! Also included is a recipe for the Jalapeño Mayo. Spice your Burgers up with this recipe! You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes. So Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

 

Horseradish Turkey Burgers
Bored with burgers? It’s time to spice up your burger. Horseradish, Dijon and grilled jalapeño mayo brings the heat to this dinner recipe that’s under 500 calories per serving.

INGREDIENTS
Jalapeño mayo:
2 jalapeños, stemmed, halved lengthwise, seeded
¼ cup fat-free mayonnaise
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
Burgers:
⅔ cup whole wheat panko breadcrumbs
¼ cup milk
1 (16-ounce) package JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast
2 links JENNIE-O® Sweet Italian Turkey Sausage Links, casings removed
4 green onions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons horseradish, drained
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
4 reduced-calorie wheat hamburger buns, halved
¼ cup crumbled blue cheese, if desired
4 lettuce leaves

DIRECTIONS
1) Coat grill with non-stick cooking spray and place over medium-high heat. Add jalapeños, cut side down; cook 5 minutes or until charred on all sides. Remove jalapeños from grill, and place in blender or food processor. Add mayonnaise and mustard. Blend until smooth. Set aside.
2) In medium bowl, combine breadcrumbs and milk and soak 5 minutes. Add ground turkey, sausage, green onions, horseradish and mustard to crumb mixture. Mix to combine. Form meat mixture into 4 burgers. Spray grill pan or grill with non-stick spray over medium-high heat. Grill burgers 6 minutes per side. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Toast hamburger buns, cut side down 1 minute.
3) Assemble burger with jalapeño mayo on bottom bun. Add lettuce, burger, blue cheese and bun top
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 360
Protein 42g
Carbohydrates 32g
Fiber 5g
Sugars 6g
Fat 8g
Cholesterol 90mg
Sodium 780mg
Saturated Fat 2g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/657-horseradish-turkey-burgers

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Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – CORNED BUFFALO ON BLACK RYE

March 15, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is – CORNED BUFFALO ON BLACK RYE. Irish eyes will be smiling with this wek’s recipe of a CORNED BUFFALO ON BLACK RYE! Made with Wild Idea Buffalo CORNED BRISKET and topped with Horseradish Sauce and served on Black Rye Bread. You can find this recipe at the Wild Idea Buffalo website and you can purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo CORNED BRISKET or any of the other Wild Idea products. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

CORNED BUFFALO ON BLACK RYE
Once you have tried our Corned Buffalo Brisket it will become a “must have” for not just St. Patrick’s Day, but for those decadent, piled high, Corned Buffalo sandwiches.

Ingredients:
As much Corned Buffalo as you like
2 – slices black rye bread
Horseradish sauce
Capers

Preparation:

* Spread horseradish sauce on black rye bread.
* Slice Corned Buffalo and pile high on bread.
* Sprinkle with capers if desired and place other slice on top of meat.
* Cut in half and serve with your favorite beverage.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/corned-buffalo-on-black-rye

 


Wild Idea Buffalo CORNED BRISKET
Back by popular demand, our Buffalo Corned Brisket is nitrite free, brine cured and slowly cooked for juicy tenderness. With Easy “Heat & Eat” instructions on the package it’s a must have product.

1 lb. package

Cooking instructions: Thaw brisket in refrigerator. Remove from bag and place brisket and juices along with one to two cups of your favorite beer or liquid in a heavy pot. Bring juices to a boil then reduce heat to a simmer. Top the corned brisket with sliced cabbage, cover and heat through for 10 to 15 minutes. Serve with buttered potatoes, pan juices and coarse mustard.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/ranch-kitchen/products/corned-buffalo-brisket

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Summer Sausage Canapes

August 10, 2016 at 5:09 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is Summer Sausage Canapes. A healthy and delicious hors d’oeuvre made with Wild Idea Buffalo Summer Sausage. You can find this recipe at the Wild Idea Buffalo website! At the Wild Idea site you can find a great selection of delicious and healthy recipes and purchase any of the Wild Idea Buffalo Meats and products. Check it out soon! http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

Summer Sausage Canapes

Sometimes big flavor comes in small bites! This quick hors d’oeuvre can be whipped up in minutes, with just a few ingredients from your fridge.
IngredientsSummer Sausage Canapes
1 – 10 oz. Buffalo Summer Sausage
24 – rectangular *Italian Style crackers, *They are super thin, extra crispy, and not too salty!
12 – ounces Irish cheddar cheese
¼ – cup mayonnaise
1 – tablespoon horseradish
¼ – lemon, juiced
1 – tablespoon caper juice
salt & pepper
capers

Preparation
1) Slice the Wild Idea Summer Sausage into 12 circles, and then slice the circles into halves.Wild Idea
2) Slice the cheese into 24 rectangular slices.
3) In a small mixing bowl, mix the mayonnaise, horseradish, lemon and caper juice together. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
4) Stack the cheese and meat onto the crackers. Garnish with the sauce and capers, and arrange on a platter or board. Serve with cold beer!

http://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/54019905-summer-sausage-canapes

Condiment of the Week – Remoulade

May 5, 2016 at 4:56 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | 2 Comments
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A half-spoon of French remoulade

A half-spoon of French remoulade

Rémoulade (English pronunciation: /reɪməˈlɑːd/; French: [ʁemulad]) is a condiment invented in France that is usually aioli- or mayonnaise-based. Although similar to tartar sauce, it is often more yellowish (or reddish in Louisiana), sometimes flavored with curry, and sometimes contains chopped pickles or piccalilli. It can also contain horseradish, paprika, anchovies, capers and a host of other items. While its original purpose was possibly for serving with meats, it is now more often used as an accompaniment to seafood dishes, especially pan-fried breaded fish fillets (primarily sole and plaice) and seafood cakes (such as crab or salmon cakes).

 
Remoulade is used in France, Denmark, Iceland, Faroe Islands, Germany, Poland, Sweden, Netherlands, Norway and in the United States, especially in Louisiana Creole cuisine. It is used with french fries, on top of roast beef items, and as a hot dog condiment, although there are a multitude of other applications:

* France: rémoulade is made from mayonnaise to which is added vinegar, mustard, shallots, capers, chopped pickles, and/or fresh herbs (chives, tarragon, chervil, burnet). It is commonly used in céleri rémoulade, which consists of thinly cut pieces of celeriac with a mustard-flavored remoulade and also to accompany red meats, fish and shellfish.
* Belgium: One of the condiments for frites, often sold at takeaway stands.
* Netherlands: Often served with fried fish.
* Germany: Mainly used with fried fish, and as an ingredient of potato salads. When marketed as “Danish remoulade”, it is used for the “Danish hot dog”, fish with boiled potatoes, dill and creamed spinach.
* Sweden: Remouladsås – the French version – is a common accessory to fried or breaded fish dishes, and used as topping on roast beef. The Danish version is also available, and is used on a variety of dishes referred to as ‘Danish-style’, for example Danish hot-dogs, Danish smørrebrød and suchlike.
* Denmark: An essential ingredient on open-face roast beef sandwiches (smørrebrød), along with Fried onion. Remoulade is also used for fish meatballs or breaded fillets of fish (e.g. cod or plaice) along with lemon slices. For french fries, the Danes can usually order tomato ketchup, remoulade or both, although in recent years mayonnaise has gained ground. In most regions it is used on hot dogs along with hot or sweet mustard, ketchup, fried or raw onions and pickled cucumber slices.
* Norway: Primarily served with deep fried fish.
* Iceland: remúlaði is a condiment commonly served on hot dogs, together with mustard, ketchup, and raw and fried onions.
* USA: Typically served as a condiment with seafoods and certain vegetables. Fried soft-shell crab sandwiches may be served with remoulade as the only sauce.
* Louisiana Creole cuisine: Remoulade often contains paprika and tends to be have a tannish or pink tint due to the use of Creole brown mustard like Zatarain’s, small amounts of ketchup, cayenne pepper, and paprika.

 
Varieties
Sauce rémoulade
According to Larousse Gastronomique, rémoulade is 1 cup of mayonnaise with 2 tablespoons mixed herbs (parsley, chives, chervil and tarragon), 1 tablespoon drained capers, 2 finely diced cornichons and a few drops of anchovy essence (optional). Some recipes use chopped anchovy fillets. The rémoulade used in céleri rémoulade is a simple mustard-flavored mayonnaise spiced with garlic and pepper. Rémoulade is classified in French cooking as a derivative of the mayonnaise sauce.

Danish remoulade
Danish remoulade has a mild, sweet-sour taste and a medium yellow color. The typical industrially-made variety does not contain capers, but finely-chopped cabbage and pickled cucumber, fair amounts of sugar and hints of mustard, cayenne pepper, coriander and onion, and turmeric for color. The herbs are replaced by herbal essences, e.g. tarragon vinegar. Starch, gelatin or milk protein may be added as thickeners.

Homemade or gourmet varieties may use olive oil (especially good with fish), capers, pickles, carrots, cucumber, lemon juice, dill, chervil, parsley or other fresh herbs, and possibly curry.

Louisiana remoulade

Louisiana remoulade can vary from the elegant French-African Creole, the rustic Afro-Caribbean Creole, or the Classic Cajun version, and like the local variants of roux, each version is different from the French original. Creole versions often have tan or pink hues and are usually piquant. Louisiana-style remoulades fall generally into one of two categories—those with a mayonnaise base and those with an oil base, but sometimes both mayonnaise and oil are used. Each version may have finely chopped vegetables, usually green onions and celery, and parsley; most are made with either Creole or stone-ground mustard. Salt, black pepper, and cayenne pepper are also standard ingredients. In the oil- and mayonnaise-based versions, the reddish hue often comes from the addition of a small amount of ketchup. The sauce is often topped with paprika for the aesthetics as well as the flavor. Generally, acidity is added with the inclusion of lemon juice or vinegar. Other additions include hardboiled egg or raw egg yolks, minced garlic, hot sauce, vinegar, horseradish, capers, cornichons, and Worcestershire sauce.

While the classic white remoulade is a condiment that can be offered in a variety of contexts (e.g. the classic celery

Louisiana-style remoulade sauce

Louisiana-style remoulade sauce

root remoulade), Creole remoulade is used on shrimp, crabs, fried calamari, artichokes, and fried green tomatoes among other foods. Today, shrimp remoulade is a very common cold appetizer in New Orleans Creole restaurants, although, historically, hard boiled eggs with remoulade was a less expensive option on some menus. Shrimp remoulade is most often served as a stand-alone appetizer (usually on a chiffonade of iceberg lettuce). One might also see crawfish remoulade, but remoulade sauce is very seldom offered in restaurants as an accompaniment with fish; cocktail sauce and tartar sauce are generally the condiments of choice. Food columnist and cookbook author Leon Soniat suggests to “Serve [remoulade] over seafood or with sliced asparagus.”

Central Mississippi has Comeback sauce, a condiment that is very similar to Louisiana remoulade.

 

Condiment of the Week – Horseradish Sauce

February 11, 2016 at 6:20 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | 2 Comments
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A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage). It is a root vegetable used as a spice.

The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is now popular around the world. It grows up to 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root.

The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated, however, enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Grated mash should be used immediately or preserved in vinegar for best flavor. Once exposed to air or heat it will begin to lose its pungency, darken in color, and become unpleasantly bitter tasting over time.

 

 

Helluva Good Bacon Horseradish
Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland. In the UK it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast, but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: “his wit’s as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard” in Henry IV Part II. A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany. In France, sauce au raifort is popular in Alsatian cuisine.

In the U.S., the term “horseradish sauce” refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread. Horseradish cream is a mixture of horseradish and sour cream and is served alongside au jus for a prime rib dinner.

Herb and Spice of the Week – Horseradish

February 12, 2015 at 6:20 AM | Posted in Herb and Spice of the Week | Leave a comment
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Sections of roots of the horseradish plant

Sections of roots of the horseradish plant

Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage). The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is now popular around the world. It grows up to 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root.

The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated, however, enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Grated mash should be used immediately or preserved in vinegar for best flavor. Once exposed to air or heat it will begin to lose its pungency, darken in color, and become unpleasantly bitter-tasting over time.

 

Foliage of the horseradish plant

Foliage of the horseradish plant

Horseradish is perennial in hardiness zones 2–9 and can be grown as an annual in other zones, although not as successfully as in zones with both a long growing season and winter temperatures cold enough to ensure plant dormancy. After the first frost in the autumn kills the leaves, the root is dug and divided. The main root is harvested and one or more large offshoots of the main root are replanted to produce next year’s crop. Horseradish left undisturbed in the garden spreads via underground shoots and can become invasive. Older roots left in the ground become woody, after which they are no longer culinarily useful, although older plants can be dug and re-divided to start new plants. The early season leaves can be distinctively different, asymmetric spiky, before the mature typical flat broad leaves start to be developed.

 
Cooks use the terms “horseradish” or “prepared horseradish” to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in color. It will keep for months refrigerated but eventually will darken, indicating it is losing flavour and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, while edible, are not commonly eaten, and are referred to as “horseradish greens”, which have a flavor similar to that of the roots.
Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland. In the UK it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast, but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: “his wit’s as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard” in Henry IV Part II. A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany.

 

 

In the U.S., the term “horseradish sauce” refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread. Horseradish cream is a mixture of horseradish and sour cream and is served alongside au jus for a prime rib dinner.

 

 

The distinctive pungent taste of horseradish is from the compound allyl isothiocyanate. Upon crushing the flesh of horseradish, the enzyme myrosinase is released and acts on the glucosinolates sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, which are precursors to the allyl isothiocyanate. The allyl isothiocyanate serves the plant as a natural defense against herbivores. Since allyl isothiocyanate is harmful to the plant itself, it is stored in the harmless form of the glucosinolate, separate from the myrosinase enzyme. When an animal chews the plant, the allyl isothiocyanate is released, repelling the animal. Allyl isothiocyanate is an unstable compound, degrading over the course of days at 37 °C. Because of this instability, horseradish sauces lack the pungency of the freshly crushed roots.

 

 

A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

In Central and Eastern Europe horseradish is called khren (in various spellings like kren) in many Slavic languages, in Austria, in parts of Germany (where the other German name Meerrettich isn’t used), in North-East Italy, and in Yiddish (כריין translitered as khren).

There are two varieties of khreyn. “Red” khreyn is mixed with red beet (beetroot) and “white” khreyn contains no beet. It is popular in Ukraine (under the name of хрін, khrin), in Poland (under the name of chrzan), in Lithuania (krienai) in the Czech Republic (křen), in Russia (хрен, khren), in Hungary (torma), in Romania (hrean), in Lithuania (krienai), in Bulgaria (хрян, khryan), and in Slovakia (under the name of chren). Having this on the table is a part of Christian Easter and Jewish Passover tradition in Eastern and Central Europe.

* In parts of Southern Germany like Franconia, “Kren” is an essential component of the traditional wedding dinner. It is served with cooked beef and a dip made from lingonberry to balance the slight hotness of the Kren.
* In Poland, a variety with red beet is called ćwikła z chrzanem or simply ćwikła.
* In Ashkenazi European Jewish cooking beet horseradish is commonly served with gefilte fish.
* In Transylvania, Red beet with horseradish is also used as a salad served with lamb dishes at Easter called sfecla cu hrean and other Romanian regions.
* In Serbia, ren is an essential condiment with cooked meat and freshly roasted suckling pig.
* In Croatia, freshly grated horseradish (Croatian: Hren) is often eaten with boiled ham or beef.
* In Slovenia, and in the adjacent Italian regions of Friuli Venezia Giulia and nearby Italian region of Veneto, horseradish (often grated and mixed with sour cream, vinegar, hard-boiled eggs, or apples) is also a traditional Easter dish.
* Further west in the Italian regions of Lombardy, Emilia-Romagna, and Piedmont, it is called “barbaforte (strong beard)” and is a traditional accompaniment to bollito misto; while in north-eastern regions like Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia, it is still called “kren” or “cren”. In the southern region of Basilicata it is known as “rafano” and used for the preparation of the so-called “rafanata”, a main course made of horseradish, eggs, cheese and sausage.
* Horseradish is also used as a main ingredient for soups. In the Polish region of Silesia, horseradish soup is a common Easter Day dish.

 

Herb and Spice of the Week – Horseradish

October 23, 2014 at 5:23 AM | Posted in Herb and Spice of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,
Sections of roots of the horseradish plant

Sections of roots of the horseradish plant

Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage). The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is now popular around the world. It grows up to 4.9 feet tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root.

The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated, however, enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Grated mash should be used immediately or preserved in vinegar for best flavor. Once exposed to air or heat it will begin to lose its pungency, darken in color, and become unpleasantly bitter-tasting over time.
Horseradish is perennial in hardiness zones 2–9 and can be grown as an annual in other zones, although not as successfully as in zones with both a long growing season and winter temperatures cold enough to ensure plant dormancy. After the first frost in the autumn kills the leaves, the root is dug and divided. The main root is harvested and one or more large offshoots of the main root are replanted to produce next year’s crop. Horseradish left undisturbed in the garden spreads via underground shoots and can become invasive. Older roots left in the ground become woody, after which they are no longer culinary useful, although older plants can be dug and re-divided to start new plants. The early season leaves can be distinctively different, asymmetric spiky, before the mature typical flat broad leaves start to be developed.

 

 

 

A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

Cooks use the terms “horseradish” or “prepared horseradish” to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in color. It will keep for months refrigerated but eventually will darken, indicating it is losing flavour and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, while edible, are not commonly eaten, and are referred to as “horseradish greens”, which have a flavor of root.
Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland. In the UK it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast, but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: “his wit’s as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard” in Henry IV Part II. A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany.

In the U.S., the term “horseradish sauce” refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread. Horseradish cream is a mixture of horseradish and sour cream and is served alongside au jus for a prime rib dinner.

The distinctive pungent taste of horseradish is from the compound allyl isothiocyanate. Upon crushing the flesh of horseradish, the enzyme myrosinase is released and acts on the glucosinolates sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, which are precursors to the allyl isothiocyanate. The allyl isothiocyanate serves the plant as a natural defense against herbivores. Since allyl isothiocyanate is harmful to the plant itself, it is stored in the harmless form of the glucosinolate, separate from the myrosinase enzyme. When an animal chews the plant, the allyl isothiocyanate is released, repelling the animal. Allyl isothiocyanate is an unstable compound, degrading over the course of days at 37 °C. Because of this instability, horseradish sauces lack the pungency of the freshly crushed roots.

 

 
Compounds found in horseradish have been widely studied for a plethora of health benefits. Horseradish contains volatile oils, notably mustard oil, which has antibacterial properties due to the presence of allyl isothiocyanate. Fresh, the plant also contains average 79.31 mg of vitamin C per 100 g of raw horseradish.

The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), found in the plant, is used extensively in molecular biology and biochemistry.

 

Tuna Melt with Horseradish Mayonnaise w/ Baked Fries

February 16, 2014 at 6:16 PM | Posted in Ore - Ida | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Tuna Melt with Horseradish Mayonnaise w/ Baked Fries

 

 

 
Another day, another day of additional snow!! Only 1″ overnight but it just keeps adding up. I heard this morning on the morning news that we’ve set a new record for the most snow. This area just isn’t used to this snow for this long of a period of time. It’s been quite a Winter. For dinner tonight something new, a Tuna Melt with Horseradish Mayonnaise w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

 

Tuna Melt Fries 004
Came across a form of this recipe from a Food Network Magazine a while back and also I’ve seen several others online. I love Tuna, Melts, and Cheese so I thought I would give it a try. I used 2 – 5 ounce cans of Chicken of the Sea Chunk Light Tuna in Water (Drained), 3 tablespoons Kraft Light Mayonnaise, 1/4 cup finely chopped celery, 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh parsley, 1 teaspoon Paprika, 2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar, and Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper (to taste) for the Tuna. Then for the Horseradish Mayonnaise I needed 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish, 4 tablespoons Kraft Light Mayonnaise, and 1 tablespoon French’s Spicy Brown Mustard. I also need Meijer Bakery Whole Wheat Mini Sub Buns and slices of Muenster Cheese.

 

 

 

Tuna Melt Fries 003
To prepare it I preheated the oven to 475 degrees F. Combined 4 tablespoons mayonnaise, the tuna, celery, parsley, paprika, and vinegar in a large bowl and mixed well. Seasoned with salt and pepper. Combined 4 tablespoons of mayonnaise along with the mustard and prepared horseradish in a small bowl; spread on the bread slices and arrange on a baking sheet. Mound the tuna mixture on top and pat it into an even layer. Topping each with 1 cheese slice. Baked until the cheese melts, 5 to 7 minutes. It turned out incredible! The Tuna mix had great flavor along with the melted Muenster Cheese and Crusty Bun. A keeper recipe for sure! You can serve it open face, which I did or top it with the other half of the bun.

 

 
I also had baked some Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries, served with Hunt’s Ketchup. For dessert my Mom had baked an Apple Pie that she made with Splenda. The pie just melts in your mouth!

 

 

 
Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style FriesOre Ida Simply

You can take the potatoes out of the country.
But you can’t take the country out of our delicious Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style French Fries. Simple ingredients like potatoes, olive oil and sea salt – simply prepared. That’s Ore-Ida style.
Ore-Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style French Fries:
* French fried potatoes seasoned with cracked black pepper, olive oil and sea salt
* All natural
* Made with Grade A potatoes
* 0 grams trans fat per serving
* Gluten free
* Kosher
SERVING SIZE: 84g
CALS 130
FAT 4 1/2g
SODIUM 290mg
CARBS 22g
http://www.oreida.com/en/Products/S/Simply-Olive

Fall Harvest: Horseradish

October 5, 2013 at 9:50 AM | Posted in vegetables | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

 

Sections of roots of the horseradish plant

Sections of roots of the horseradish plant

Horseradish is at its best in fall and winter. Like so many other root vegetables, however, it stores well and is often available in decent shape well into spring.

 

Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana, syn. Cochlearia armoracia) is a perennial plant of the Brassicaceae family (which also includes mustard, wasabi, broccoli, and cabbage). The plant is probably native to southeastern Europe and western Asia. It is now popular around the world. It grows up to 1.5 meters (5 feet) tall, and is cultivated primarily for its large, white, tapered root.
The intact horseradish root has hardly any aroma. When cut or grated, however, enzymes from the now-broken plant cells break down sinigrin (a glucosinolate) to produce allyl isothiocyanate (mustard oil), which irritates the mucous membranes of the sinuses and eyes. Once exposed to air (via grating) or heat, if not used immediately or mixed in vinegar, the grated mash darkens, loses its pungency, and becomes unpleasantly bitter-tasting.

 

 

Horseradish is perennial in hardiness zones 2–9 and can be grown as an annual in other zones, although not as successfully as in zones with both a long growing season and winter temperatures cold enough to ensure plant dormancy. After the first frost in the autumn kills the leaves, the root is dug and divided. The main root is harvested and one or more large offshoots of the main root are replanted to produce next year’s crop. Horseradish left undisturbed in the garden spreads via underground shoots and can become invasive. Older roots left in the ground become woody, after which they are no longer culinarily useful, although older plants can be dug and re-divided to start new plants.

 

 

Cooks use the terms “horseradish” or “prepared horseradish” to refer to the grated root of the horseradish plant mixed with vinegar. Prepared horseradish is white to creamy-beige in colour. It will keep for months refrigerated but eventually will darken, indicating it is losing flavor and should be replaced. The leaves of the plant, while edible, are not commonly eaten, and are referred to as “horseradish greens”, which have a flavor of root.

 

 

A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

A bottle of Heinz horseradish sauce

Horseradish sauce made from grated horseradish root and vinegar is a popular condiment in the United Kingdom and in Poland. In the UK it is usually served with roast beef, often as part of a traditional Sunday roast, but can be used in a number of other dishes also, including sandwiches or salads. A variation of horseradish sauce, which in some cases may substitute the vinegar with other products like lemon juice or citric acid, is known in Germany as Tafelmeerrettich. Also popular in the UK is Tewkesbury mustard, a blend of mustard and grated horseradish originating in medieval times and mentioned by Shakespeare (Falstaff says: “his wit’s as thick as Tewkesbury Mustard” in Henry IV Part II. A very similar mustard, called Krensenf or Meerrettichsenf, is popular in Austria and parts of Eastern Germany.
In the U.S., the term “horseradish sauce” refers to grated horseradish combined with mayonnaise or salad dressing. Prepared horseradish is a common ingredient in Bloody Mary cocktails and in cocktail sauce, and is used as a sauce or sandwich spread.
The distinctive pungent taste of horseradish is from the compound allyl isothiocyanate. Upon crushing the flesh of horseradish, the enzyme myrosinase is released and acts on the glucosinolates sinigrin and gluconasturtiin, which are precursors to the allyl isothiocyanate. The allyl isothiocyanate serves the plant as a natural defense against herbivores. Since allyl isothiocyanate is harmful to the plant itself, it is stored in the harmless form of the glucosinolate, separate from the myrosinase enzyme. When an animal chews the plant, the allyl isothiocyanate is released, repelling the animal. Allyl isothiocyanate is an unstable compound, degrading over the course of days at 37 °C. Because of this instability, horseradish sauces lack the pungency of the freshly crushed roots.

 

 

Compounds found in horseradish have been widely studied for a plethora of health benefits. Horseradish contains volatile oils, notably mustard oil, which has antibacterial properties due to the presence of allyl isothiocyanate. Fresh, the plant also contains average 79.31 mg of vitamin C per 100 g of raw horseradish.
The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), found in the plant, is used extensively in molecular biology and biochemistry.

 

 

S

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Au Jus Roast for Sirloin Tip & Top Round Roast

April 10, 2013 at 9:33 AM | Posted in bison | Leave a comment
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Hot & High, Low & Slow Au Jus Roast for Sirloin Tip & Top Round Roast
By: Jill O’Brien

 
This Hot & High, then Low & Slow method of roasting produces a delicious and amazingly tender medium rare roast. Serve this classic Wild Idea Sirloin Tip Roaststyle roast with au jus and horseradish cream sauce. This is great roast for entertaining a crowd or a make ahead staple for shaved roast buffalo sandwiches.

 

 

INGREDIENTS:
Sirloin Tip or Top Round Roast

3 T Olive Oil
Salt & Pepper to Taste
1 T butter
1 cup wine, stock or water
PREPARATION:

1 – Rinse roast and pat dry.
2 – Rub roast with olive oil & season as desired. Let roast rest at room temperature for 2 hours before roasting.
3 – Pre-heat oven to 500°
4 – Place prepared roast in heavy roasting pan, and place in 500° oven. Close door quickly.
5 – Reduce oven temperature to 475° and roast uncovered for 13 minutes.­
6 – Turn oven off. Leave roast in oven for 2 ½ hours. DO NOT OPEN THE OVEN DOOR ANYTIME DURING ROASTING PROCESS. (And yes, that is important enough for all caps!)
7 – Remove roast from oven and place on cutting board. Slice roast, keeping slices close together.
8 – Place roasting pan on stove top, over medium high heat.
9 – Add 1 tablespoon butter and scrape brown bits from the bottom of the pan.
10 – Deglaze with 1 cup wine, stock or water and bring to a simmer, for au jus.
11 – Preheat oven to 500° and place sliced roast in oven for 5 minutes to warm. Pass roast with au jus and horseradish sauce.
Temperature Guide–Internal Temperatures of Meat:

Rare – 130 degrees. Medium-rare – 140 degrees. Medium – 155 degrees.
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/hot-high-low-slow-au-jus-roast-for-sirloin-tip-top-round-roast/

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