One of America’s Favorites – Submarine Sandwich

April 6, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A submarine sandwich

A submarine sandwich, also known as a sub, hoagie, hero, or grinder, is a type of sandwich consisting of a length of bread or roll split lengthwise and filled with a variety of meats, cheeses, vegetables, and condiments. The sandwich has no standardized name, with over a dozen variations used around the world.

The terms submarine and sub are widespread and not assignable to any certain region, though many of the localized terms are clustered in the northeastern United States.

The Italian sandwich originated in several different Italian American communities in the Northeastern United States from the late 19th to mid-20th centuries. Portland, Maine, claims to be the birthplace of the Italian sandwich and it is considered Maine’s signature sandwich. The popularity of this Italian-American cuisine has grown from its origins in Connecticut, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island to most parts of the United States and Canada, and with the advent of chain restaurants, is now available in many parts of the world.

Submarine
The use of the term “submarine” or “sub” (after the resemblance of the roll to the shape of a submarine) is widespread. While some accounts source the name as originating in New London, Connecticut (site of the United States Navy’s primary submarine base) during World War II, written advertisements from 1940 in Wilmington, Delaware, indicate the term originated prior to the United States’ entry into World War II.

One theory says the submarine was brought to the U.S. by Dominic Conti (1874–1954), an Italian immigrant who came to New York in the early 1900s. He is said to have named it after seeing the recovered 1901 submarine called Fenian Ram in the Paterson Museum of New Jersey in 1928. His granddaughter has stated the following:
My grandfather came to this country circa 1895 from Montella, Italy. Around 1910, he started his grocery store, called Dominic Conti’s Grocery Store, on Mill Street in Paterson, New Jersey where he was selling the traditional Italian sandwiches. His sandwiches were made from a recipe he brought with him from Italy, which consisted of a long crust roll, filled with cold cuts, topped with lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, onions, oil, vinegar, Italian herbs and spices, salt, and pepper. The sandwich started with a layer of cheese and ended with a layer of cheese (this was so the bread wouldn’t get soggy).

Salami, ham and cheeses on a hoagie roll

Hoagie

The term hoagie originated in the Philadelphia area. The Philadelphia Bulletin reported, in 1953, that Italians working at the World War I–era shipyard in Philadelphia known as Hog Island, where emergency shipping was produced for the war effort, introduced the sandwich by putting various meats, cheeses, and lettuce between two slices of bread. This became known as the “Hog Island” sandwich; shortened to “Hoggies”, then the “hoagie”.

Dictionary.com offers the following origin of the term hoagie. n. American English (originally Philadelphia) word for “hero, large sandwich made from a long, split roll”; originally hoggie (c. 1936), traditionally said to be named for Big Band songwriter Hoagland Howard “Hoagy” Carmichael (1899–1981), but the use of the word predates his celebrity and the original spelling seems to suggest another source (perhaps “hog”). Modern spelling is c. 1945, and may have been altered by influence of Carmichael’s nickname.

The Philadelphia Almanac and Citizen’s Manual offers a different explanation, that the sandwich was created by early-twentieth-century street vendors called “hokey-pokey men”, who sold antipasto salad, meats, cookies and buns with a cut in them. When Gilbert and Sullivan’s operetta H.M.S. Pinafore opened in Philadelphia in 1879, bakeries produced a long loaf called the pinafore. Entrepreneurial “hokey-pokey men” sliced the loaf in half, stuffed it with antipasto salad, and sold the world’s first “hoagie”.

Another explanation is that the word hoagie arose in the late 19th to early 20th century, among the Italian community in South Philadelphia, when “on the hoke” meant that someone was destitute. Deli owners would give away scraps of cheeses and meats in an Italian bread-roll known as a “hokie”, but the Italian immigrants pronounced it “hoagie”.

Shortly after World War II, there were numerous varieties of the term in use throughout Philadelphia. By the 1940s, the spelling “hoagie” had come to dominate less-used variations like “hoogie” and “hoggie”. It is never spelled hoagy. By 1955, restaurants throughout the area were using the term hoagie. Listings in Pittsburgh show hoagies arriving in 1961 and becoming widespread in that city by 1966.

Former Philadelphia mayor (and later Pennsylvania governor) Ed Rendell declared the hoagie the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia”. However, there are claims that the hoagie was actually a product of nearby Chester, Pennsylvania. DiCostanza’s in Boothwyn, Pennsylvania, claims that the mother of DiConstanza’s owner originated the hoagie in 1925 in Chester. DiCostanza relates the story that a customer came into the family deli and through an exchange matching the customer’s requests and the deli’s offerings, the hoagie was created.

Woolworth’s to-go sandwich was called a hoagie in all U.S. stores.

Bánh mì sandwiches are sometimes referred to as “Vietnamese hoagies” in Philadelphia.

New York style meatball hero with mozzarella

Hero
The New York term hero is first attested in 1937. The name is sometimes credited to the New York Herald Tribune food writer Clementine Paddleford in the 1930s, but there is no good evidence for this. It is also sometimes claimed that it is related to the gyro, but this is unlikely as the gyro was unknown in the United States until the 1960s.

Hero (plural usually heros, not heroes) remains the prevailing New York City term for most sandwiches on an oblong roll with a generally Italian flavor, in addition to the original described above. Pizzeria menus often include eggplant parmigiana, chicken parmigiana, and meatball heros, each served with sauce.

Grinder
A common term in New England is grinder, but its origin has several possibilities. One theory has the name coming from Italian-American slang for a dock worker, among whom the sandwich was popular. Others say that it was called a grinder because it took a lot of chewing to eat the hard crust of the bread used.

Pastrami grinder

In Pennsylvania, New York, Delaware, and parts of New England, the term grinder usually refers to a hot submarine sandwich (meatball, sausage, etc.), whereas a cold sandwich (e.g., cold cuts) is usually called a “sub”. In the Philadelphia area, the term grinder is also applied to any hoagie that is toasted in the oven after assembly, whether or not it is made with traditionally hot ingredients.

Wedge
The term wedge is used in Westchester County, New York, Putnam County, New York, Dutchess County, New York, and Fairfield County, Connecticut – four counties directly north of New York City.

Some base the name wedge on a diagonal cut in the middle of the sandwich, creating two halves or “wedges”, or a “wedge” cut out of the top half of the bread with the fillings “wedged” in between, or a sandwich that is served between two “wedges” of bread. It has also been said wedge is just short for “sandwich”, with the name having originated from an Italian deli owner located in Yonkers, who got tired of saying the whole word.

Spukie
The term spukie (“spukkie” or “spuckie”) is unique to the city of Boston and derives from the Italian word spuccadella, meaning “long roll”. The word spucadella is not typically found in Italian dictionaries, which may suggest that it could be a regional Italian dialect, or possibly a Boston Italian-American innovation. Spukie is typically heard in parts of Dorchester and South Boston. Some bakeries in Boston’s North End neighborhood have homemade spucadellas for sale.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Cheesesteak

December 26, 2016 at 6:13 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A cheesesteak sandwich

A cheesesteak sandwich

A cheesesteak, also known as a Philadelphia cheese steak, Philly cheesesteak, cheesesteak sandwich, cheese steak, or steak and cheese, is a sandwich made from thinly sliced pieces of beefsteak and melted cheese in a long hoagie roll. A popular regional fast food, it has its roots in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

 

 
The cheesesteak was developed in the early 20th century “by combining frizzled beef, onions, and cheese in a small loaf of bread”, according to a 1987 exhibition catalog published by the Library Company of Philadelphia and the Historical Society of Pennsylvania.

Philadelphians Pat and Harry Olivieri are often credited with inventing the sandwich by serving chopped steak on an Italian roll in the early 1930s. The exact story behind its creation is debated, but in some accounts, Pat and Harry Olivieri originally owned a hot dog stand, and on one occasion, decided to make a new sandwich using chopped beef and grilled onions. While Pat was eating the sandwich, a cab driver stopped by and was interested in it, so he requested one for himself. After eating it, the cab driver suggested that Olivieri quit making hot dogs and instead focus on the new sandwich. They began selling this variation of steak sandwiches at their hot dog stand near South Philadelphia’s Italian Market. They became so popular that Pat opened up his own restaurant which still operates today as Pat’s King of Steaks. The sandwich was originally prepared without cheese; Olivieri said provolone cheese was first added by Joe “Cocky Joe” Lorenza, a manager at the Ridge Avenue location.”

Cheesesteaks have become popular at restaurants and food carts throughout the city with many locations being independently owned, family run businesses. Variations of cheesesteaks are now common in several fast food chains. Versions of the sandwich can also be found at high-end restaurants. Many establishments outside of Philadelphia refer to the sandwich as a “Philly cheesesteak.”

 
Description
Meat
The meat traditionally used is thinly sliced rib-eye or top round, although other cuts of beef are also used. On a lightly oiled griddle at medium temperature, the steak slices are quickly browned and then scrambled into smaller pieces with a flat spatula. Slices of cheese are then placed over the meat, letting it melt, and then the roll is placed on top of the cheese. The mixture is then scooped up with a spatula and pressed into the roll, which is then cut in half.

Common additions include sautéed onions, bell peppers, mushrooms, mayonnaise, hot sauce, salt, pepper.

Bread
In Philadelphia, most cheesesteak places use Amoroso or Vilotti-Pisanelli rolls; these rolls are long, soft, and slightly salted. One source writes that “a proper cheesesteak consists of provolone or Cheez Whiz slathered on an Amoroso roll and stuffed with thinly shaved grilled meat,” while a reader’s letter to an Indianapolis magazine, lamenting the unavailability of good cheesesteaks, wrote that “the mention of the Amoroso roll brought tears to my eyes.” After commenting on the debates over types of cheese and “chopped steak or sliced,” Risk and Insurance magazine declared “The only thing nearly everybody can agree on is that it all has to be piled onto a fresh, locally baked Amoroso roll.”

Cheese
American cheese, Cheez Whiz, and provolone are the most commonly used cheeses or cheese products put on to the Philly cheesesteak.

White American cheese along with provolone cheese are the favorites due to the mild flavor and medium consistency of American cheese. Some establishments melt the American cheese to achieve the creamy consistency, while others place slices over the meat, letting them melt slightly under the heat. Philadelphia Inquirer restaurant critic Craig LaBan says “Provolone is for aficionados, extra-sharp for the most discriminating among them.” Geno’s owner, Joey Vento, said, “We always recommend the provolone. That’s the real cheese.”

Cheez Whiz, first marketed in 1952, was not yet available for the original 1930 version, but has spread in popularity. A 1986 New York Times article called Cheez Whiz “the sine qua non of cheesesteak connoisseurs.” In a 1985 interview, Pat Olivieri’s nephew Frank Olivieri said that he uses “the processed cheese spread familiar to millions of parents who prize speed and ease in fixing the children’s lunch for the same reason, because it is fast.” Cheez Whiz is “overwhelmingly the favorite” at Pat’s, outselling runner-up American by a ratio of eight or ten to one, while Geno’s claims to go through eight to ten cases of Cheez Whiz a day.

 
Variations

A cheesesteak with lots of cheese sauce

A cheesesteak with lots of cheese sauce

* A chicken cheesesteak is made with chicken instead of beef, sometimes referred to as a chicken Philly
* A pizza steak is a cheesesteak topped with pizza sauce and mozzarella cheese and may be toasted in a broiler
* A cheesesteak hoagie contains lettuce and tomato in addition to the ingredients found in the traditional steak sandwich, and may contain other elements often served in a hoagie.
* A vegan cheesesteak is a sandwich that replaces steak and cheese with vegan ingredients, such as seitan or mushrooms for the steak, and soy-based cheese.

 

Thin Sliced Pork Tenderloin Hoagie w/ Baked Potato

April 12, 2016 at 4:55 PM | Posted in pork tenderloin | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Thin Sliced Pork Tenderloin Hoagie w/ Baked Potato

 

Thin Sliced Pork Tenderloin Hoagie w Baked Potato 007
I just had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea for Breakfast. Went out to grab the papers and it had finally quit raining! Cold though about 31 degrees. Nice day out though, sunny and around 50 degrees. After Breakfast I went to Meijer for Mom, she needed a few items. Back home and got the leaf blower out and cleaned the wooden deck and around the house. Finally got our satellite dish repositioned. Since they removed all the woods out from behind us our reception was going bad, everything good now. For dinner tonight I prepared a Thin Sliced Pork Tenderloin Hoagie w/ Baked Potato.

 

Thin Sliced Pork Tenderloin Hoagie w Baked Potato 002
I purchased the Pork Tenderloin from Meijer the other day, about 1 1/2 lbs.. To make the dish I’ll need; 1 tablespoon Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1 pork Tenderloin, 1 tbsp Roasted Cumin, 1 tsp Garlic Powder, 1 tsp Chili Powder, 1 teaspoon Sea Salt, 1/2 teaspoon Hungarian Paprika, 2 teaspoons Dried Oregano, and 1/4 teaspoon Black Pepper. To prepare it preheat oven to 350°. Combine all the ingredients; rub it all over the pork. Let stand 20 minutes. Heat the oil in a Cast Iron Skillet over medium-high heat. Add pork to pan; cook 4 minutes, browning on all sides. From the stove to the oven; Bake at 400° for 10 minutes or until a thermometer registers 155° (slightly pink), turning after 7 minutes. Remove from the skillet into a platter or dish and let stand 10 minutes before slicing. Then get ready to enjoy one delicious Pork Tenderloin! Fantastic combo of Spices, which makes one incredible Crust on the Pork with the inside being tender and moist! This is my favorite Pork Recipe by far!

 

 

Thin Sliced Pork Tenderloin Hoagie w Baked Potato 003
When the Pork was done I let it cool for 5 minutes and started slicing. I sliced it thin so it would pile up on the bun just right. So to finish making the Hoagie I’ll need;Sargento Ultra Thin Provolone Cheese, French’s Spicy Brown Mustard, and Kroger 100% Whole Wheat Hoagie Roll. I first spread some of the French’s Spicy Brown Mustard on the bottom half of the Hoagie Roll, then layered 2 slices of the Sargento Ultra Thin Provolone Cheese, next I layered in my sliced Pork Roast, then spread some more of the Spicy Mustard on the Pork, and topped it with the top bun of the roll. A delicious Masterpiece! I love Pork Tenderloin anyway it can be prepared. The Provolone works great with Pork and the Spicy Brown Mustard was made for Pork. A winning Hoagie Dish for sure!

 

 

Baked Potato
For a side dish I baked a Russet Potatoes. I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Peppercorn Medley. Topped it with I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter. Then for dessert later tonight a Skinny Cow Chocolate Truffle Ice Cream Bar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Pork TenderloinNatural Pork Tenderloin
Simple Truth Natural Pork comes from pigs raised humanely on family farms, and fed an all-vegetarian diet as nature intended. This results in pork that is tender and flavorful — the way pork should taste.
• No antibiotics — ever
• No added hormones — ever
• No preservatives
• No artificial colors or flavors — ever
• Always 100% vegetarian-fed

http://www.simpletruth.com/products/meat/pork/natural-pork-tenderloin/

Turkey Meatball Mini Sub

September 26, 2014 at 5:08 PM | Posted in Boar's Head, Honeysuckle White Turkey Products | 5 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Turkey Meatball Mini Sub

 

 

 

Turkey Meatball Sub 005
It’s been another Beautiful day in the neighborhood outside again. A tad warmer though, we hit 80 degrees today. Went to Meijer for Mom this morning and back home. Didn’t do a lot today, not feeling up to par today. For dinner tonight I prepared a Turkey Meatball Mini Sub.

 

 

 
I used Honeysuckle White Fresh Italian Style Turkey Meatballs. I usually try to use Jennie – O Turkey Products but as far as I know none of the local stores carry the Meatballs. I’ve been using the Honeysuckle White Fresh Italian Style Turkey Meatballs for quite a few years now. The Meatballs are good size, always fresh, meaty, and have a fantastic taste and their 190 calories and 5 net carbs for 3 Meatballs. For my Pasta Sauce I used LaRosa’s Original Sauce. A local favorite and still one of the best Sauces I’ve ever had.

 

 

 
For my Hoagie Bun I used Kroger Brand 100% Whole Wheat Hoagie Rolls. For my Cheese I used Boar’s Head Lower Sodium Provolone Cheese, first time I tried this and love it! Has a really fantastic Creamy Flavor to it. Loaded the Hoagie Roll up with the Meatballs and Sauce, topped it with a slice of Provolone Cheese and baked it at 400 degrees until the the Roll was toasted and Cheese melted. These Hoagies are too good! For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 

 

 

 
Honeysuckle White Fresh Italian Style Turkey MeatballsHoneysuckle White Fresh Italian Style Turkey Meatballs

Product Description
Add traditional Italian taste to your pasta dishes with our Fresh Italian Style Turkey Meatballs. They’re fully cooked and ready to heat and eat.

 
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 3 oz (85.0 g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 190 Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 10.0g 15%
Saturated Fat 3.0g 15%
Cholesterol 65mg 22%
Sodium 600mg 25%
Total Carbohydrates 6.0g 2%
Dietary Fiber 0.5g 2%
Sugars 1.0g
Protein 17.0g

 

 

http://www.honeysucklewhite.com/ProductDetail.aspx?product_id=1

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