No Dinner Post tonight, Happy Labor Day!

September 6, 2021 at 6:30 PM | Posted in cooking, Food, grilling | Leave a comment
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Happy Labor Day everyone. We are spending time with family and friends so there will be no Dinner Post. Be back tomorrow! Enjoy the Day, Stay Safe, and Take Care!

Ohio Festivals – August 20th – 22nd, 2021

August 20, 2021 at 2:33 PM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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August 21-22, 2021 Fairborn Sweet Corn Festival – Fairborn, Ohio
The Fairborn Sweet Corn Festival features handmade arts and crafts. This is a family oriented alcohol-free event featuring children’s activities with free entertainment, parking, and activities. Many local and regional artisans offering handmade arts and crafts, and of course, Sweet Corn!

https://www.fairbornsweetcornfestival.org/about-the-festival.html

One of America’s Favorites – French Fries

July 5, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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French fries

French fries, or simply fries (North American English), chips (British and Commonwealth English, Hiberno-English), finger chips (Indian English), hot chips (Australian English) or French-fried potatoes, are deep-fried potatoes, which have been cut into batons.

French fries are served hot, either soft or crispy, and are generally eaten as part of lunch or dinner or by themselves as a snack, and they commonly appear on the menus of diners, fast food restaurants, pubs, and bars. They are often salted and may be served with ketchup, vinegar, mayonnaise, tomato sauce, or other local specialties. Fries can be topped more heavily, as in the dishes of poutine or chili cheese fries. Chips can be made from sweet potatoes instead of potatoes. A baked variant, oven chips, uses less oil or no oil.

French fries are prepared by first cutting the potato (peeled or unpeeled) into even strips, which are then wiped off or soaked in cold water to remove the surface starch, and thoroughly dried. They may then be fried in one or two stages. Chefs generally agree that the two-bath technique produces better results. Potatoes fresh out of the ground can have too high a water content—resulting in soggy fries—so preference is for those that have been stored for a while.

A hamburger with crispy fries

In the two-stage or two-bath method, the first bath, sometimes called blanching, is in hot fat (around 160 °C/320 °F) to cook them through. This step can be done in advance. Then they are more briefly fried in very hot fat (190 °C/375 °F) to crisp the exterior. They are then placed in a colander or on a cloth to drain, salted, and served. The exact times of the two baths depend on the size of the potatoes. For example, for 2–3 mm strips, the first bath takes about 3 minutes, and the second bath takes only seconds. One can cook french fries using several techniques. Deep frying submerges food in hot fat, most commonly oil. Vacuum fryers are suitable to process low-quality potatoes with higher sugar levels than normal, as they frequently have to be processed in spring and early summer before the potatoes from the new harvest become available. In the UK, a chip pan is a deep-sided cooking pan used for deep-frying. Chip pans are named for their traditional use in frying chips.

Most french fries are produced from frozen potatoes which have been blanched or at least air-dried industrially. Most chains that sell fresh cut fries use the Idaho Russet Burbank variety of potatoes. It has been the standard for french fries in the United States. The usual fat for making french fries is vegetable oil. In the past, beef suet was recommended as superior, with vegetable shortening as an alternative. In fact, McDonald’s used a mixture of 93% beef tallow and 7% cottonseed oil until 1990, when they switched to vegetable oil with beef flavoring. Starting in the 1960s, more fast food restaurants have been using frozen french fries.

Crinkle-cut fries

French fries are fried in a two step process: the first time is to cook the starch throughout the entire cut at a low heat, and the second time is to create the golden crispy exterior of the fry at a higher temperature. This is necessary because if the potato cuts are only fried once, the temperature would either be too hot, causing only the exterior to be cooked and not the inside, or not hot enough where the entire fry is cooked, but its crispy exterior will not develop. Although the potato cuts may be baked or steamed as a preparation method, this section will only focus on french fries made using frying oil. During the initial frying process (approximately 150 °C), water on the surface of the cuts evaporates off the surface and the water inside the cuts gets absorbed by the starch granules, causing them to swell and produce the fluffy interior of the fry. The starch granules are able to retain the water and expand due to gelatinization. The water and heat break the glycosidic linkages between amylopectin and amylose strands, allowing a new gel matrix to form via hydrogen bonds which aid in water retention. The moisture that gets trapped in between the gel matrix is responsible for the fluffy interior of the fry. The gelatinized starch molecules move towards the surface of the fries “forming a thick layer of gelatinised starch” and this layer of pre-gelatinized starch will turn into the crispy exterior after the potato cuts are fried for a second time. During the second frying process (approximately 180 °C), the remaining water on the surface of the cuts will evaporate and the gelatinized starch molecules that collected towards the potato surface are cooked again, forming the crispy exterior. The golden-brown color of the fry will develop when the amino acids and glucose on the exterior participate in a Maillard browning reaction.

Although french fries were a popular dish in most British Commonwealth countries, the “thin style” french fries have been popularized worldwide in large part by the large American fast food chains such as McDonald’s, Burger King, and Wendy’s. In the United States, the J. R. Simplot Company is credited with successfully commercializing french fries in frozen form during the 1940s. Subsequently, in 1967, Ray Kroc of McDonald’s contracted the Simplot company to supply them with frozen fries, replacing fresh-cut potatoes. In 2004, 29% of the United States’ potato crop was used to make frozen fries – 90% consumed by the food services sector and 10% by retail. The United States is also known for supplying China with most of their french fries as 70% of China’s french fries are imported.

Waffle fries

Pre-made french fries have been available for home cooking since the 1960s, having been pre-fried (or sometimes baked), frozen and placed in a sealed plastic bag. Some varieties of french fries that appeared later have been battered and breaded, and many fast food chains in the U.S. dust the potatoes with kashi, dextrin, and other flavor coatings for crispier fries with particular tastes. French fries are one of the most popular dishes in the United States, commonly being served as a side dish to entrees and being seen in fast food restaurants. The average American eats around 30 pounds of french fries a year.

Fries tend to be served with a variety of accompaniments, such as salt and vinegar (malt, balsamic or white), pepper, Cajun seasoning, grated cheese, melted cheese, mushy peas, heated curry sauce, curry ketchup, hot sauce, relish, mustard, mayonnaise, bearnaise sauce, tartar sauce, chili, tzatziki, feta cheese, garlic sauce, fry sauce, butter, sour cream, ranch dressing, barbecue sauce, gravy, honey, aioli, brown sauce, ketchup, lemon juice, piccalilli, pickled cucumber, pickled gherkins, pickled onions or pickled eggs.

Grilling and Chilling, Happy Memorial Day!

May 31, 2021 at 7:06 PM | Posted in cooking, Food, grilling | Leave a comment
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Happy Memorial Day everyone! Hope you are enjoying the day with Family and Friends as we are. I have the Grill fired up and we are grilling Burgers and Hot Dogs. So no big Dinner post tonight. Have a great Memorial Day, Stay Safe and Take Care All!

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 5, 2021 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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When buying ground beef…………

When buying ground beef, look for clear cellophane wrapping and be sure there are no tears in the packaging. Also always be sure to check the expiration date. The meat should be a bright red cherry color with the fat marbling uniformly mixed. If it is brown or gray on the outside, that means it has begun to spoil.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 5, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Relax Don’t Overwork……..

When making perfect hamburger patties, remember: the more you handle the meat, the tougher your burger will be. In a large bowl, pull the meat apart into small chunks, add salt or other seasonings, and toss gently with fingers spread apart until loosely mixed.

Happy Memorial Day All!

May 28, 2018 at 5:08 PM | Posted in cooking | Leave a comment
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Happy Memorial Day everyone. Let’s all take time to remember and honor all those serving our country around the world, Also honor those that have given their live to defend our country through the years.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 8, 2017 at 5:33 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Where’s the wax paper……

 

When freezing hamburgers, chops, or steaks, which tend to stick together when frozen, separate them with pieces of waxed paper or freezer wrap. You will then be able to remove the amount needed without thawing the whole batch.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 5, 2016 at 5:16 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Make sure those Burgers are done……

 

Lots of people like steaks rare (like myself), but don’t do the same for your hamburger. More bacteria is present in ground beef, so cook until it’s well done and no pink is in the middle. If in doubt, grab a meat thermometer and make sure the temperature reaches no less than 160 degrees in the burger’s center.

Ohio Festivals – August 11th – 14th, 2016

August 10, 2016 at 9:06 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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August 11-14, 2016 Ohio Valley Antique Machinery Show
Georgetown, Ohio
Antique/craft/flea market, 4 parades, tractors, engines & equipment, Sunday antique car show, camping & RV sites, baby costume contest, entertainment, antique and garden tractor pulls, covered bridge, log cabin livin’, threshing, sawmill, rock crushing, canning, broom making, grist mill, block making, shingle mill, blacksmith, etc.

http://www.ovams.com/

 

OHIO 2
August 12-14, 2016 North Ridgeville Corn Festival
North Ridgeville, Ohio
The annual festival will feature Sweet’s corn steamed or roasted. Enjoy musical entertainment, parade, arts and crafts show, amusement rides, games, food, corn eating contest, 5 & 10k run, car show and horseshoe tournament.

http://www.nrcornfest.org/

 
August 13-14, 2016 National Hamburger Festival – Akron, Ohio
Hamburger Cook-Off, Ohio Hamburger Eating Championships, Bobbing For Burgers, Miss Hamburger Festival, Live Music, Family & Children’s Activities. Attendance: 30,000+

http://hamburgerfestival.com/

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