One of America’s Favorites – Salisbury Steak

June 24, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Salisbury steak with brown sauce

Salisbury steak is a dish, originating in the United States, made from a blend of ground beef and other ingredients and usually served with gravy or brown sauce. Hamburg steak is a similar product but differs in ingredients.

Prior to the popularity of minced or ground beef like Salisbury steak in the United States, similar foods already existed in the culinary tradition of Europe. The Apicius cookbook, a collection of ancient Roman recipes that may date to the early 4th century, details a preparation of beef called isicia omentata; served as a baked patty in which minced or chopped beef is mixed with pine kernels, black and green peppercorns, and white wine, isicia omentata may be the earliest precursor to the hamburger. In the 12th century, the nomadic Mongols carried food made of several varieties of milk (kumis) and meat (horse or camel). During the life of their leader Genghis Khan (1167–1227), the Mongol army occupied the western portions of the modern-day nations of Russia, Ukraine, and Kazakhstan, forming the so-called Golden Horde. This cavalry dominated army was fast moving and sometimes unable to stop for a meal, so they often ate while riding. They wrapped a few slices of meat under their saddles so it would crumble under pressure and motion and be cooked by heat and friction. This recipe for minced meat spread throughout the Mongol Empire until its split in the 1240s. It was common for Mongol armies to follow different groups of animals (such as herds of horses or oxen or flocks of sheep) that provided the necessary protein for the warriors’ diets. Marco Polo also recorded descriptions of the culinary customs of the Mongol warriors, indicating that the flesh of a single pony could provide one day’s sustenance for 100 warriors.

When Genghis Khan’s grandson Kublai Khan (1215–1294) invaded Moscow, he and his warriors introduced minced horsemeat to the Muscovites. This was later called steak tartare. The city states of what is now Germany took to this ground meat product and created many of their own dishes by adding capers, onions and even caviar to the blend and selling it on the streets. One of the oldest references to a Hamburgh Sausage appeared in 1763 in the cookbook entitled Art of Cookery, Made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse (1708–1770). Hamburg Sausage is made with minced meat and a variety of spices, including nutmeg, cloves, black pepper, garlic, and salt, and is typically served with toast. A wide variety of traditional European dishes are also made with minced meat, such as meatloaf, the Serbian pljeskavica, the Arab kofta, and meatballs.

Hamburg and its port
Minced meat was a delicacy in medieval cuisine, red meat usually being restricted to the higher classes. Very little mincing was done by medieval butchers or recorded in the cookbooks of the time, perhaps because it was not part of the sausage-making process that preserve meat. Russian ships brought recipes for steak tartare to the port of Hamburg during the 17th century, a time when there was such a great presence of Russian residents there that it was nicknamed “the Russian port”. Trade within the Hanseatic League between the 13th and 17th centuries made this port one of the largest in Europe, its commercial importance being further heightened as it became vital to early transatlantic voyages during the age of steam. In the period of European colonization of the Americas, immigrants to this port were a “bridge” between old European recipes and the future development of the hamburger in the United States.

During the first half of the 19th century, most of the northern European emigrants who traveled to the New World embarked on their transatlantic voyages from Hamburg. The German shipping company Hamburg America Line, also known as the Hamburg Amerikanische Packetfahrt Actien-Gesellschaft (HAPAG), was involved in Atlantic transport for almost a century. The company began operations in 1847 and employed many German immigrants, many of them fleeing the revolutions of 1848–9. New York City was the most common destination for ships traveling from Hamburg, and various restaurants in the city began offering the Hamburg-style steak in order to attract German sailors. The steak frequently appeared on the menu as a Hamburg-style American fillet, or even beefsteak à Hambourgeoise. Early American preparations of minced beef were therefore made to fit the tastes of European immigrants, evoking memories of the port of Hamburg and the world they left behind.

Hamburg steak

Hamburg steak is known by the name “Frikadelle” in Germany since (at least) the 17th century.

In the late 19th century, the Hamburg steak became popular on the menus of many restaurants in the port of New York. This kind of fillet was beef minced by hand, lightly salted and often smoked, and usually served raw in a dish along with onions and bread crumbs. The oldest document that refers to the Hamburg steak is a Delmonico’s Restaurant menu from 1873 which offered customers an 11-cent plate of Hamburg steak that had been developed by American chef Charles Ranhofer (1836–1899). This price was high for the time, twice the price of a simple fillet of beef steak. However, by the end of the century the Hamburg steak was gaining popularity because of its ease of preparation decreasing cost. This is evident from its detailed description in some of the most popular cookbooks of the day. Documents show that this preparation style was used by 1887 in some U.S. restaurants and was also used for feeding patients in hospitals; the Hamburg steak was served raw or lightly cooked and was accompanied by a raw egg.

The menus of many American restaurants during the 19th century included a Hamburg beefsteak that was often sold for breakfast.

Dr. Salisbury
Coming from this history of ground meat dishes is the Salisbury steak, which today is usually served with a gravy similar in texture to brown sauce. Dr. James Salisbury (1823–1905), an American physician and chemist, advocated for a meat-centered diet to promote health, and the term Salisbury steak has been used in the United States since 1897.[18]

Dr. Salisbury recommended this recipe (somewhat different from modern Salisbury steak recipes) for the treatment of alimentation (digestive problems):

“ Eat the muscle pulp of lean beef made into cakes and broiled. This pulp should be as free as possible from connective or glue tissue, fat and cartilage…previous to chopping, the fat, bones, tendons and fasciae should all be cut away, and the lean muscle cut up in pieces an inch or two square. Steaks cut through the centre of the round are the richest and best for this purpose. Beef should be procured from well fatted animals that are from four to six years old.
The pulp should not be pressed too firmly together before broiling, or it will taste livery. Simply press it sufficiently to hold it together. Make the cakes from half an inch to an inch thick. Broil slowly and moderately well over a fire free from blaze and smoke. When cooked, put it on a hot plate and season to taste with butter, pepper, salt; also use either Worcestershire or Halford sauce, mustard, horseradish or lemon juice on the meat if desired. Celery may be moderately used as a relish. ”

Salisbury steak remains popular in the United States, where it is traditionally served with gravy and mashed potatoes or pasta.

United States Department of Agriculture standards for processed, packaged “Salisbury steak” require a minimum content of 65% meat, of which up to 25% can be pork, except if de-fatted beef or pork is used, the limit is 12% combined. No more than 30% may be fat. Meat byproducts are not permitted; however, beef heart meat is allowed. Extender (bread crumbs, flour, oat flakes, etc.) content is limited to 12%, except isolated soy protein at 6.8% is considered equivalent to 12% of the others. The remainder consists of seasonings, fungi or vegetables (onion, bell pepper, mushroom or the like), binders (can include egg) and liquids (such as water, milk, cream, skim milk, buttermilk, brine, vinegar etc.). The product must be fully cooked, or else labeled “Patties for Salisbury Steak”.

The standards for hamburger limit the meat to beef only, and of skeletal origin only. Salt, seasonings and vegetables in condimental proportions can be used, but liquids, binders and/or extenders preclude the use of the term “hamburger” or “burger”. With these added, the product is considered “beef patties”.

Products not made in USDA-inspected establishments are not bound by these standards and may be bound by other standards which vary from country to country.

Hamburg steak is a very similar dish.

The “Hamburger Rundstück” was popular already 1869, and is believed to be a precursor to the modern hamburger.

In Sweden, Pannbiff is similar to a Salisbury steak and is often made by a mix of ground pork and beef, chopped onions, salt and pepper. It is served with boiled potatoes, gravy made from cream, caramelized onions and lingonberries. It is a very traditional dish that is common in the husman cuisine.[citation needed]

Minced cutlet (котлета рубленая, kotleta rublenaya), or, since the late 19th century, simply “cutlet”, is a staple of Russian cuisine. It is similar to a Salisbury steak, with the main difference being pure beef is rarely employed, usually pork or a beef-pork mixture is used. The meat is seasoned with salt and pepper, mixed with finely chopped onion (optionally fried), garlic, and a binder (eggs and breadcrumbs soaked in milk), divided into oval-shaped patties, lightly breaded and shallow-fried in a half-inch of vegetable oil. The transliterated Japanese dish, menchi katsu, is always deep-fried and heavily breaded, being essentially a mincemeat croquette, while the Russian version is always shallow-fried.

 

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Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 26, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Bring on the Seasoning…………

Ground Beef alone makes a pretty dull-tasting Hamburger, so make sure the Meat is mixed throughout with at least Salt and Pepper. Other ingredients, like Worcestershire Sauce, Hot Sauce, Grated Onions, or Lipton Onion Soup Mix will improve not only the taste but also the juiciness of your Hamburgers.

Diabetic Dish of the Week – CHIPOTLE PEPPER JACK SLIDERS

September 11, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – CHIPOTLE PEPPER JACK SLIDERS. Sliders with a little heat and Diabetic Friendly! You’ll need Ground Beef (96% lean), Minced Garlic, Chipotle Chili Powder, Pepper Jack Cheese, all served on small Whole Wheat Hamburger Buns. This is just one of a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes that you can find at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. Be sure to check it out today! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

CHIPOTLE PEPPER JACK SLIDERS
Ingredients

1 pound Ground Beef (96% lean)
9 small whole wheat hamburger buns, split, divided
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground chipotle chili powder
2 slices pepper Jack cheese, cut in quarters

Directions

1 – Tear one hamburger bun into pieces. Place in food processor or blender container. Cover; pulse on and off, to form fine crumbs.
2 – Combine bread crumbs, beef, garlic and chili powder in medium bowl, mixing lightly but thoroughly. Lightly shape into eight 1/2-inch thick mini patties.
3 – Place patties on grill over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 8 to 9 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, 9 to 10 minutes) until instant-read thermometer inserted horizontally into center registers 160F, turning occasionally. Evenly top with cheese during last minute of grilling.
4 – Place burgers on bottoms of remaining eight buns. Top with desired Toppings. Close sandwiches.
NOTES:
Lean ground beef mini-burgers, or sliders, are kicked up with chipotle chili and topped with spicy pepper jack cheese.

Recipe Yield: Makes 8 sliders (mini-burgers)

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 201
Fat: 6 grams
Saturated Fat: 3 grams
Fiber: 3 grams
Sodium: 266 milligrams
Cholesterol: 40 milligrams
Protein: 16 grams
Carbohydrates: 21 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/chipotle-pepper-jack-sliders

One of America’s Favorites – Tavern Sandwich

July 30, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A tavern sandwich with cheese

A tavern sandwich (also called a loose meat sandwich or loosemeat) is a sandwich consisting of ground beef on a bun, mixed with sauteed onions, and sometimes topped with pickles, ketchup, mustard, and cheese.

The tavern sandwich is unlike a hamburger, because a tavern’s meat is cooked loose rather than formed into a compact patty. It more closely resembles a sloppy joe, without the tomato-based sauce.

Carroll Dietz of Missoula, Montana created the precursor to the tavern sandwich in 1920, referred to as a “steamed hamburger.” In 1926, Fred Angell began selling his version of the sandwich at the first Maid-Rite restaurant in Muscatine, Iowa under the name “loose meat sandwich.” The name “tavern” for the sandwich is credited to David Heglin. Heglin sold the sandwiches at his Sioux City, Iowa restaurant in 1924. After Heglin died, Abe Kaled bought the business in 1934 and renamed the restaurant Ye Olde Tavern after the sandwich. Kaled perfected the recipe for the ground beef, and the tavern sandwich spread to restaurants and bars across the Sioux City area.

The sandwich is now well known throughout the Midwestern United States, and is served not only in small, local establishments but also in franchise restaurant locations such as Dairy Queen and Maid-Rite. The Wichita, Kansas-based chain Nu Way Cafe serves a version of the tavern/loose meat sandwich called a “Nu Way”. In Illinois, the sandwich is also known as a “loose hamburger sandwich”. In Iowa, it is sometimes referred to as a Maid-Rite.

 

Healthy Beef Recipes

June 27, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Beef Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Beef Recipes like; Baked Beans with Ground Beef, Steak and Potato Grill Packets with Blue Cheese and Rosemary, and Grilled Lime Chicken and Steak with Herb and Arugula Salad. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Food Magazines, EatingWell Magazine at the site also. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Beef Recipes
Find healthy, delicious beef recipes including ground beef, roast beef, stews and beef brisket. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Baked Beans with Ground Beef
Upgrade baked beans from classic side dish to a meaty main meal by adding lean ground beef. The final result, a superfast hearty casserole, is an easy and fast dinner option. Ground turkey or even sausage would work nicely in this dish. Just watch the sodium…………

Steak and Potato Grill Packets with Blue Cheese and Rosemary
Steak and potatoes are a classic combo on the grill. We have taken the concept one step further by adding green beans and rosemary, and wrapping everything in a packet to make a complete meal. A sprinkling of blue cheese just before serving is the perfect finish for this steak-house special……………………..

Grilled Lime Chicken and Steak with Herb and Arugula Salad
This recipe involves one of our favorite make-ahead hacks: let the chicken and steak marinate in reverse. In this recipe, you’ll pour a punchy, citrusy dressing over the meat right after it leaves the grill, so it soaks up the bright vinaigrette as it cools. Better yet, reverse-marinating keeps the grilled meat from drying out, even when kept in the fridge overnight…..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Beef Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18237/ingredients/meat-poultry/beef/

Soup Special of the Day………….Taco Bean Soup SUNDAY

April 29, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, soup, Soup Special of the Day | Leave a comment
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This week’s Soup Special of the Day is a Taco Bean Soup. Hearty Soups at it’s best with this week’s recipe! Made with Ground Beef, Pinto Beans, Corn, Tomatoes, Green Chilies, and more! This is just one of so many delicious and healthy recipes that you can find at the CooksRecipes website. The Cook’s site has huge selection of recipes to please all tastes, diets, or cuisines so be sure to check it out today. So enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Taco Bean Soup
If you like tacos, you will love this hearty soup that’s simmered to a savory flavor.

Recipe Ingredients:
1 pound lean ground beef
1 onion, chopped
3 (16-ounce) cans pinto beans, undrained
1 (15-ounce) can canned corn, undrained
1 (15-ounce) can chopped tomatoes, undrained
1 (15-ounce) can tomato sauce
1 1/2 cups water
1 (4-ounce) can cans ORTEGA® Diced Green Chiles
1 (1.25-ounce) package ORTEGA® Taco Seasoning Mix
1 packet Italian dry salad dressing mix

Cooking Directions:
1 – Cook ground beef and onion in a heavy-bottomed skillet over medium-high heat until browned; drain.
2 – Stir in pinto beans, corn, tomatoes, tomato sauce, water, green chile peppers, taco seasoning mix, and dry salad dressing mix. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, and simmer for 15 minutes.
Makes 6 servings.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/soup/taco_bean_soup_recipe.html

Diabetic Dish of the Week – BOLD THAI BURGER

March 6, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a BOLD THAI BURGER. Made with 96% lean Ground Beef and combined with green onion, ground ginger and hot sauce. Then the Burger is topped with a sauce that combines combine peanut butter, hoisin sauce, and lime juice. That’s what makes it a BOLD THAI BURGER! Its only 273 calories and 23 net carbs per serving.The recipe is from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. At the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes along with Diabetes News and Diabetes Management Tips, so check it out today. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

BOLD THAI BURGER
Ingredients

1 pound 96% lean Ground Beef
1 cup shredded Napa cabbage
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice, divided
1/2 cup chopped green onions
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon hot chili sauce
1 tablespoon creamy peanut butter
1 tablespoon hoisin sauce
1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
Salt and pepper
4 whole wheat or white hamburger buns, split

Directions

1 – Combine cabbage and 1 tablespoon lime juice in medium bowl; set aside.
2 – Combine Ground Beef, green onion, ground ginger and hot sauce in medium bowl, mixing lightly but thoroughly. Lightly shape into four 1/2-inch thick patties.
3 – Heat nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Place patties in skillet; cook 10 to 12 minutes until instant-read thermometer inserted horizontally into center registers 160F, turning occasionally. Season with salt and pepper, as desired.
4 – Meanwhile, combine peanut butter, hoisin sauce, remaining 1 tablespoon lime juice and sesame oil in small bowl. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use.
5 – Place 1 burger on bottom half of each bun; top evenly with peanut butter mixture and cabbage mixture. Close sandwiches.
NOTES:
A unique hamburger topped with the flavors of Thailand, including peanut butter, lime juice and hoisin sauce.

Recipe Yield: Makes 4 servings

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 273
Fat: 7 grams
Saturated Fat: 2 grams
Fiber: 4.5 grams
Sodium: 416 milligrams
Cholesterol: 65 milligrams
Protein: 27 grams
Carbohydrates: 27 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/bold-thai-burger

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 25, 2018 at 6:34 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Tacos please…….

Instead of making the usual Ground Beef Tacos change it up for the next Taco Night! Substitute the Ground Beef with Bison, Chicken, or Pork instead. Also try a Breakfast Taco for the Mornings, the ingredients are endless!

Diabetic Dish of the Week – MEXICAN MEATBALL KABOBS

January 23, 2018 at 6:20 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – MEXICAN MEATBALL KABOBS. Ground Beef, Bell Peppers, and seasoning go in to make this week’s recipe. It’s from one of my favorite recipe websites the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. At the site you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes along with Diabetic Management tips, Diabetic News, and more. So check it out today. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

MEXICAN MEATBALL KABOBS

Ingredients

Nonstick cooking spray
3 pounds lean ground beef
2 cups quick oats
1 can (12 fluid ounces) Nestlé Carnation Evaporated Milk
2 large eggs
1/2 cup ketchup
2 packets (1.25 ounces each) taco seasoning mix
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
3 large bell peppers (any color), cut into 60, 1-inch pieces
60 4-inch wooden skewers
Salsa and sour cream (optional)
Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 350F. Foil-line 3 baking sheets and spray with nonstick cooking spray.
2 – Combine ground beef, oats, evaporated milk, eggs, ketchup, taco seasoning and black pepper in large bowl until just mixed. Form mixture into 120, 1-inch meatballs. Place on prepared baking sheets.
3 – Bake for 15 to 20 minutes or until no longer pink in center. Drain on paper towels, if needed.
4 – Thread two meatballs and one piece of pepper on each skewer. Place on large serving platter. Serve with salsa and sour cream.

Recipe Yield: Yield Makes 30 servings, 2 skewers each

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 110
Fat: 1.5 grams
Saturated Fat: 1.5 grams
Fiber: 1 grams
Sodium: 260 milligrams
Cholesterol: 40 milligrams
Protein: 11 grams
Carbohydrates: 8 grams
Sugars: 3 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/mexican-meatball-kabobs

One of America’s Favorites – Cheeseburger

December 25, 2017 at 7:03 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cheeseburger

A cheeseburger is a hamburger topped with cheese. Traditionally, the slice of cheese is placed on top of the meat patty, but the burger can include many variations in structure, ingredients, and composition. The cheese is normally added to the cooking hamburger patty shortly before serving, which allows the cheese to melt. As with other hamburgers, a cheeseburger may include toppings, such as lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, mustard, mayonnaise, ketchup, or bacon.

In fast food restaurants, the cheese used is normally processed cheese, but other cheeses may be used instead, such as cheddar, Swiss, mozzarella, blue cheese, and pepper jack. Also, in rare cases, spinach and olives are added.

 

By the late nineteenth century, the opening of the vast grasslands of the Great Plains to cattle ranching had made it possible for every American to enjoy beef almost daily. Hamburger was one of the cheapest way for even the poorest of Americans to eat beef.

Adding cheese to hamburgers became popular in the late-1920s to mid-1930s, and there are several competing

A cheddar-stuffed cheeseburger

claims as to who created the first cheeseburger. Lionel Sternberger is reputed to have introduced the cheeseburger in 1926 at the age of 16 when he was working as a fry cook at his father’s Pasadena, California sandwich shop, “The Rite Spot”, and “experimentally dropped a slab of American cheese on a sizzling hamburger.”

An early example of the cheeseburger appearing on a menu is a 1928 menu for the Los Angeles restaurant O’Dell’s which listed a cheeseburger smothered with chili for 25 cents.

Other restaurants also claim to have invented the cheeseburger. For example, Kaelin’s Restaurant in Louisville, Kentucky, said it invented the cheeseburger in 1934. One year later, a trademark for the name “cheeseburger” was awarded to Louis Ballast of the Humpty Dumpty Drive-In in Denver, Colorado. According to Steak ‘n Shake archives, the restaurant’s founder, Gus Belt, applied for a trademark on the word in the 1930s. Another example of the hamburger invention. “The history of the hamburger appears to be divided into two aspects: the American-type hamburger, with which most people are familiar, and the idea of the hamburger from Hamburg, Germany. The essential difference is in the name and sandwich. Hamburgers may have been inspired in the German city with the profusion of beef from cows in the country terrain. Given the lack of refrigeration, the meat had to be cooked immediately, and the Hamburg beef patties became popular.

The largest cheeseburger ever made in the world weighed 2,014 pounds, “60 pounds of bacon, 50 pounds of lettuce, 50 pounds of sliced onions, 40 pounds of pickles, and 40 pounds of cheese.” The record was broken by Minnesota’s Black Bear Casino breaking the previous Cheeseburger record 881 pounds.

In the United States, National Cheeseburger Day is celebrated annually on 18 September.

 

The ingredients used to create cheeseburgers follow similar patterns found in the regional variations of hamburgers. First start with the beef ground chuck would make the best tasting burger to make it even better and healthier use grass fed grass finish beef. Popular regional toppings include bacon, avocado or guacamole, sliced sautéed mushrooms or onions, cheese sauce and/or chili. Less common ingredients include egg, feta cheese, salsa, jalapeños, and other kinds of chili peppers, anchovies, slices of ham, mustard, gyros meat, or bologna, horseradish, sauerkraut, pastrami or teriyaki-seasoned beef, tartar sauce, french fries, onion rings, potato chips, a pat of butter, pineapple, and tofu.

A cheeseburger may have more than one hamburger patty and more than one slice of cheese. A stack of two patties is called a double cheeseburger; a triple cheeseburger has three, and a quadruple has four. Some cheeseburgers are prepared with the cheese enclosed within the ground beef, rather than on top. This is sometimes known as a Jucy Lucy.

 

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