Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 1, 2014 at 9:07 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Shop later in the day to take advantage of markdowns in your grocery store‘s bakery and meat departments. Also make sure to keep an eye on the prices at the salad bar. If you only need a few artichoke hearts or croutons, they may be cheaper to buy there by the pound than elsewhere in the store.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 31, 2013 at 10:40 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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It may be a pain, but the best way to save on groceries is to shop at more than one market. You’ll soon find that one store will have cheaper produce, one will have cheaper meat, and so forth. Explore grocery stores you’ve never shopped at – perhaps one that is closer to your workplace or gym rather than by your home – and you may find even lower prices. We’ve even found cheaper products at stores that are the same chain, just a different location. Write down the prices of your most frequently purchased items, or bring a receipt from an average grocery trip with you. That way you can be sure to remember where the prices are the most reasonable.

Smoked Cajun Turkey, Rosemary Ham, and Swiss Grilled Sandwich w/ ….

December 30, 2013 at 6:12 PM | Posted in Ham, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Ore - Ida, Sargento's Cheese | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Smoked Cajun Turkey, Rosemary Ham, and Swiss Grilled Sandwich w/ Baked Fries

 

Cajun Turkey Ham Swiss Fries 001

 

Our nice weather left real quickly, snow flurries and a wind chill in the 20’s. Went to the grocery early and then spent most of the afternoon cleaning my Hoveround Chair and then catching up on laundry. For dinner tonight, Smoked Cajun Turkey, Rosemary Ham, and Swiss Grilled Sandwich w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

 

I picked up a Jennie – O Premium Portions Hickory Smoked Cajun Style Turkey Breast, try saying that five times real fast! I love these, great sliced, for sandwiches, and just the right size for 1 or 2 people (1.39 lbs). Plus it’s only it’s only 50 calories and 1 carb per serving! It comes already seasoned and precooked. Just serve cold or heated up. I heated up a few slices in the oven for the sandwich. So I had the Turkey and I also had a couple of slices of Kroger Private Selection Oven Roasted Rosemary Ham. Topped it with Sargento Ultra Thin Swiss Cheese and Hidden Valley Spicy Chipotle Spread. Served it on a couple of slices of Klosterman Wheat Bread and then grilled in a medium size skillet with a 1/2 Tbs of Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter.

 

 

 

Then for a side I baked some Ore Ida Simply Cracked Black Pepper and Sea Salt Country Style Fries, served with a side of Hunt’s Ketchup. For dessert later a Del Monte No Sugar Added Pech Chunk Cup.

 

 

Jennie o sun dried tomato turkey breast

Jennie – O Premium Portions Hickory Smoked Cajun Style Turkey Breast

Ready to cut and serve, hot or cold.
Find this product in the refrigerated section of your grocery store.
Product Features:
* 99% fat free
* Gluten Free
* Great for salads, sandwiches and more
* Fully Cooked
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 2 oz (56 g)
Servings Per Container: varies

Calories 50
Calories from Fat 5
Amount Per Serving and/or % Daily Value*
Total Fat .5 g (1%)
Saturated Fat 0 g (0%)
Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 25 mg (8%)
Sodium 610 mg (25%)
Total Carbohydrate 1 g (0%)
Dietary Fiber 0 g (0%)
Sugars 1 g
Protein 12 g

 

 
http://www.jennieo.com/products/95-Oven-Roasted-Premium-Portion-Turkey-Breast

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 24, 2013 at 7:29 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Never buy meat that’s already been shaped into patties (unless it’s on sale). Instead, buy your own and shape it into patties yourself. Place a sheet of waxed paper between each, then place the entire stack in a resealable plastic bag in the freezer.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

August 12, 2013 at 8:55 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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The freezing process can decrease the flavor of some foods, which is why all the foods in the freezer section of your grocery store have been flash frozen in seconds (usually with the help of some liquid nitrogen). It’s important that frozen foods don’t thaw and refreeze before you eat them, so on hot days make sure to visit your store’s freezer section last. That way, your purchases have less time to thaw.

Naturally Raised vs Organic (Wild Idea Buffalo)

July 19, 2013 at 11:13 AM | Posted in bison, Wild Idea Buffalo | 1 Comment
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Naturally Raised vs OrganicWild Idea Buffalo Buffalo-Grass
By: Henry Palmer

 

Now days when we peruse the aisles of our local grocery store we are hit by an onslaught of labels and tags. Two of these labels, which are appearing more and more frequently, are “Naturally Raised” and “Organic.” Both of these terms sound very appealing and should help steer the consumer towards a better product, but what do these terms really mean? A deeper look at these buzzwords is no doubt merited.

Naturally Raised

In 2009 the USDA defined the term Naturally Raised with respect to animals in the following way:1) No Growth Hormones 2) No Antibiotics –other than to prevent parasitism- and 3) no animal by products can be fed to the animals. USDA “Naturally Raised” Definition

What the USDA has chosen to include in their definition of Naturally Raised is great; however, there is a problem with what’s left out of the definition. The standard leaves out discussions of confinement and what the animals are fed – it seems everything goes as long as it’s not animal byproduct. So while this standard is certainly a step in the right direction and has closed a lot of doors that prevent producers from using certain practices, it has unfortunately still left a few windows wide open.

Organic

The definition of Organic, as it pertains to animal products, covers many of the same issues that Naturally Raised does, but once again doesn’t complete the full spectrum of animal health/best practices. According to the standard, four items must be met: 1) producers meet health and welfare standards 2) hormones and antibiotics are not used, 3) all feed must be 100% Organic, 4) animals must have access to the outdoors. USDA “Organic” Definition

Certainly the organic seal is a step in the correct direction for the food we consume, but once again it is what’s left out, or the grey areas, that present a problem. It’s great that our animals are being fed a 100% Organic diet, but is it the diet they would have chosen themselves and evolved to consume? Also, access to the outdoors is an awfully vague phrase; how often to the animals have access, what are their living conditions indoors, what type of space outdoors do they have access to? So here once again with the term Organic, we are presented with a term that doesn’t necessarily mean what we all hope it would.

At Wild Idea Buffalo Co. we are often asked about how are animals are raised and whether or not we slap such labels on our product. We do not currently label our products this way because, truth be told, we go beyond these requirements and hold ourselves to our own standards. Our buffalo is always 100% Grass-fed, 100% Free-Roaming on the land and grasses they evolved to graze 5 million years ago, 100% Hormone and Antibiotic Free, and 100% Humanely Field Harvested. We strive to treat our animals with the dignity and respect they deserve as a result end up with a exquisitely delicious and healthy meat you can enjoy with a clear conscious.

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2013/naturally-raised-vs-organic/

Winner of Mrs. Cubbison’s Thanksgiving Holiday Gift Packs

November 9, 2012 at 10:22 PM | Posted in cooking, Food | Leave a comment
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I was informed by Foodie Blogroll that I was one of four winners of the prize listed below. Thank you to Foodie Blogroll and Mrs. Cubbison’s!

Our friends at Mrs. Cubbison’s are giving away 4 Thanksgiving Holiday Gift Packs that include everything you need to make your celebration special — plus a $25 free groceries gift card!

According to a new survey by Mrs. Cubbison’s Kitchen, “Stuffing” is the one Thanksgiving dish that’s handed down from previous family generations. What’s your family’s favorite stuffing recipe? We invite you to tell us your clan’s favorite recipe or tip for a chance to win a Mrs. Cubbison’s Thanksgiving Holiday Gift Pack that includes everything you need to make your celebration special — plus a $25 free groceries gift card!

For an extra entry, visit http://www.thanksgivingtips.com and check out Mrs. Cubbison’s “Thanksgiving Across America” Survey and post a comment about it!

THE PRIZE:
Win a Mrs. Cubbison’s Thanksgiving Holiday Gift Pack that includes everything you need to make your celebration special — plus a $25 free groceries gift card!

According to a new survey by Mrs. Cubbison’s Kitchen, “Stuffing” is the one Thanksgiving dish that’s handed down from previous family generations. What’s your family’s favorite stuffing recipe? We invite you to tell us your clan’s favorite recipe or tip for a chance to win a Mrs. Cubbison’s Thanksgiving Holiday Gift Pack that includes everything you need to make your celebration special — plus a $25 free groceries gift card!

Visit http://www.thanksgivingtips.com and check out Mrs. Cubbison’s “Thanksgiving Across America” Survey and post a comment about it for an extra entry!

Stuffing, dressings and croutons from Mrs. Cubbison’s are family favorites for your Thanksgiving celebration. Catch a gaggle of turkey day tips, recipes and fun facts at Thanksgivingtips.com Stuffing, dressings and croutons from Mrs. Cubbison’s are family favorites for your Thanksgiving celebration.

Mention Thanksgivingtips.com or MrsCubbisons.com on your blog for an additional chance to win – leave a comment with a link to your post, Facebook and Twitter mentions here on the giveaway page.

 

http://www.foodieblogroll.com/

Warning Shoppers You Are Entering The Jungle Zone!

October 17, 2012 at 12:48 PM | Posted in cooking, Food | 3 Comments
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Spent the early morning at Jungle Jim’s Market where “Shopping is an Adventure!” I love going to this place! You can find almost any

The Entrance to Jungle Jim’s

item your looking for here, ANYTHING! I took along my camera with me just to show you around a bit. I left with 2 packages of fresh boiled Lobster Claws, Squid, Cheese, and plenty of Produce!
Discover a World of Food and More!

Jungle Jim’s International Market is more than a grocery store, it’s a destination! With more than 200,000 square feet of shopping space in each of our stores, there are over 150,000 products from which to choose.

In addition to all the grocery items, you’ll find store tours, food demonstrations and lots of fun and attractions for the whole family.

Our stores also offer more gift shops, boutiques, restaurants and conveniences than any other mega store in the region. Stop in for an hour or make a day of it. However you do it, shopping at Jungle Jim’s is an experience you won’t forget!

http://www.junglejims.com/

 

Still need a Pumpkin?

Still need a Pumpkin?

 

 

fresh Fish right out of the tank!

just one small part of the Cheese Shop

My favorite Deli

…and my favorite Produce Department

It’s not Grocery Shopping it’s an Adventure!

March 7, 2012 at 11:51 AM | Posted in baking, fruits, mushrooms, vegetables | Leave a comment
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If you live in the Cincinnati – Fairfield are you know about Jungle Jims. If you’ve never been you have to make it a point, it’s a one of a kind grocery shopping experience! No matter what the fruit or vegetable I’d bet the Jungle’s got it. A deli with every kind of cheese, meats, and olives imaginable. To go through every aisle you’ll need a good part of your morning to do so.

Food, grains, fruits, and vegetables from every country. The Seafood Dept. is unmatched! They even have live tanks where you can get fresh Tilapia, Trout, and Large Mouth Bass. They have different fish in the tanks from time to time. They always have 2 of my favorites fillets Walleye and Lake Perch. The Meat Dept. is just as incredible. Fresh meats; Beef, Pork Chicken, Bison, and a good selection of Wild Game. In another part of the store you’ll find Quail Eggs and even Ostrich Eggs from time to time! The Beer and Wine is full of all varieties from around the World The entire store is an adventure! I’ll leave the link to Jungle Jim’s below. Got to go I’m fixing a Turkey Pastrami and Colby Longhorn Cheese sandwich with a side of Stuffed Olives for lunch, thank you Jungle Jim’s!

Discover a World of Food and More!

Jungle Jim’s International Market is a superstore unlike any other. With 1 1/2 acres of produce, 75,000 international grocery products and cigars from 70 countries, there is much to discover. This huge grocery store also offers more gift shops, restaurants and conveniences than any other mega store in the region. Dazzling displays of fresh produce, aisles of wine and beer, artisan breads, exotic spices and more are around every corner. Enjoy freshly baked goods still warm from our scratch bakery, food demonstrations and made-to-order delicacies from our Sub Shop. Be amazed by our selection of fresh-caught seafood, meat, hot sauces, imported cheeses and international foods – plus all the American groceries and household items usually found in a supermarket. Just when you think you’ve seen everything, wander through our Candy Department and be serenaded by Elvis the Lion, learn new culinary techniques in our Cooking School and even get a beautiful flower arrangement.

At Jungle Jim’s International Market, we’re not just a store; we’re a destination!

http://www.junglejims.com/

The Submarine Sandwich

July 29, 2011 at 12:29 PM | Posted in Food | 12 Comments
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I had a 6″ Turkey Sub on Whole Wheat for lunch today at a local Subway. It got me wondering about how the Sub originated. Here’s what I found.

A submarine sandwich, also known as a sub among other names, is a sandwich that consists of a long roll of Italian or French bread, split lengthwise either into two pieces or opened in a “V” on one side, and filled with various meats, cheeses, vegetables, seasonings, and sauces. The sandwich has no standardized name, and many U.S. regions have their own names for it; one study found 13 different names for the sandwich in the United States. The usage of the several terms varies regionally but not in any pattern, as they have been used variously by the people and enterprises who make and sell them. The terms submarine and sub are widespread and not assignable to any certain region, though many of the localized terms are clustered in the northeast United States, where the most Italian Americans live.

The sandwich originated in several different Italian American communities in the Northeastern United States from the late 19th to mid 20th centuries. The popularity of this Italian-American cuisine has grown from its origins in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts to spread to most parts of the United States, and with the advent of chain restaurants, is now available in many parts of the world. In Europe it would simply be known as a baguette, or a ciabatta, named after the type of bread being used. Both types of bread are traditional breads in use in France and Italy for centuries.

The use of the term submarine or sub is widespread. One theory is that it originated in a restaurant in Scollay Square in Boston, Massachusetts at the beginning of World War I. The sandwich was created to entice the large numbers of navy servicemen stationed at the Charlestown Navy Yard. The bread was a smaller specially baked baguette intended to resemble the hull of the submarines it was named after.

Many say that the name originates from Groton, Connecticut, where there is the largest United States Submarine factory. The sandwiches were commonly eaten by workers in the naval yard. Another theory suggests the submarine was brought to the US by Dominic Conti (1874–1954), an Italian immigrant who came to New York in the early 1900s. In 1910 he started Dominic Conti’s Grocery Store on Mill Street in Paterson, New Jersey and named the sandwich after seeing the recovered 1901 submarine called “Fenian Ram” in the local Paterson Museum in 1918. His granddaughter has stated the following: “My grandfather came to this country circa 1895 from Montella, Italy. Around 1910, he started his grocery store, called Dominic Conti’s Grocery Store, on Mill Street in Paterson, New Jersey where he was selling the traditional Italian sandwiches. His sandwiches were made from a recipe he brought with him from Italy which consisted of a long crust roll, filled with cold cuts, topped with lettuce, tomatoes, peppers, onions, oil, vinegar, Italian herbs and spices, salt, and pepper. The sandwich started with a layer of cheese and ended with a layer of cheese (this was so the bread wouldn’t get soggy).”

The term hoagie originated in the Philadelphia area. Domenic Vitiello, professor of Urban Studies at the University of Pennsylvania asserts that Italians working at the World War I era shipyard in Philadelphia, known as Hog Island where emergency shipping was produced for the war effort, introduced the sandwich, by putting various meats, cheeses, and lettuce between two slices of bread. This became known as the “Hog Island” sandwich; hence, the “hoagie”.

The Philadelphia Almanac and Citizen’s Manual offers a different explanation, that the sandwich was created by early twentieth century street vendors called “hokey-pokey men”, who sold antipasto salad, along with meats and cookies. When Gilbert and Sullivan’s operetta H.M.S. Pinafore opened in Philadelphia in 1879, bakeries produced a long loaf called the pinafore. Entrepreneurial “hokey-pokey men” sliced the loaf in half, stuffed it with antipasto salad, and sold the world’s first “hoagie”.

Another explanation is that the word “hoagie” arose in the late 19th-early 20th century, among the Italian community in South Philadelphia, when “on the hoke” was a slang used to describe a destitute person. Deli owners would give away scraps of cheeses and meats in an Italian bread-roll known as a “hokie”, but the Italian immigrants pronounced it “hoagie”.

Other less likely explanations involve “Hogan” (a nickname for Irish workers at the Hog Island shipyard), a reference to the pork or “hog” meat used in hoagies, “honky sandwich” (using a racial slur for white people seen eating them) or “hooky sandwich” (derived from “hookie” for truant kids seen eating them). Shortly after World War II, there were numerous varieties of the term in use throughout Philadelphia. By the 1940s, the spellings “hoagie” and, to a lesser extent, “hoagy” had come to dominate lesser user variations like “hoogie” and “hoggie”. By 1955, restaurants throughout the area were using the term “hoagie”, with many selling hoagies and subs or hoagies and pizza. Listings in Pittsburgh show hoagies arriving in 1961 and becoming widespread in that city by 1966.[12]

Former Philadelphia mayor (and later Pennsylvania governor) Ed Rendell declared the hoagie the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia”. However, there are claims that the hoagie was actually a product of nearby Chester, Pennsylvania. DiCostanza’s in Boothwyn, Pennsylvania claims that the mother of DiConstanza’s owner originated the hoagie in 1925 in Chester. DiCostanza relates the story that a customer came into the family deli and through the series of the customers’ requests and the deli’s offerings, the hoagie was created.

A local Philadelphia variation on the hoagie is the zep made in Norristown, Pennsylvania. It is a variation on the traditional hoagie, with no lettuce and only one meat. It is made on a round roll, with provolone cheese covering meat, chunks of raw onion, and slabs of tomato. It is dressed with oregano, salt, pepper, olive oil, and hot pepper relish.

The New York term hero is first attested in 1937. The name is sometimes credited to the New York Herald Tribune food writer Clementine Paddleford in the 1930s, but there is no good evidence for this. It is also sometimes claimed that it is related to the gyro, but this is unlikely: heroes are invariably associated with Italians, not Greeks, and gyro was unknown in the United States until the 1960s.

“Hero” (Heros as the plural so not to be confused with the word “Heroes”) remains the prevailing New York City term for most sandwiches on an oblong roll with a generally Italian flavor, in addition to the original described above. Pizzeria menus often include eggplant parmigiana, chicken parmigiana, and meatball heroes, each served with tomato sauce. Pepper and egg heroes and potato and egg heroes are also popular.

All varieties of this sandwich use an oblong bread roll as opposed to sliced bread. The traditional sandwich usually includes a variety of Italian luncheon meats such as dry Genoa salami, mortadella, thin sliced pepperoni, capocollo or prosciutto, and provolone cheese served with lettuce, tomato and onions seasoned with salt, pepper, oregano and olive oil. American bologna is sometimes used in place of mortadella and ham is often substituted for capicola, with prosciutto frequently omitted.

Many locations that provide catering services also offer very large 3-foot and 6-foot “Giant” sandwiches. Crusty Italian breads are preferred for the hearty sandwiches.

Regional variations:

Grinder
* Grinders are sometimes made with toasted focaccia bread and melted mozzarella cheese.
* Both hot and cold sandwiches have been called “grinders”, though the term usually refers to a baked or toasted sandwich with sauce, such as a meatball grinder, eggplant grinder, chicken parmagiana grinder.

Hero
* Tomatoes were not a historical ingredient of the hero, but are often included in today’s heroes. Baltimore has usually preferred the term Hero, to nearby Philadelphia’s Hoagy and Washington DC’s Gryo. Italian communities existed in these cities.

Hoagie
* Philadelphia-style hoagies should have bread that is crusty on the outside and soft on the inside.
* Quite often, much of the roll’s inside will be removed to allow for the ingredients to fit.
* Hoagies often have more than one deli meat (never fish or chicken).
* Mustard and vinegar were not traditionally used in hoagies. Mayonnaise is used more commonly in many sandwich shops around the area. The traditional dressing was olive oil. Other oils, possibly seasoned, or Italian dressing are sometimes used today.
* Sweet peppers are the default, though can be replaced with hot peppers

Zep
* A standard zep contains only cooked salami and provolone as the meat and cheese, and includes no lettuce.

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