Sweet and Savory Apple Recipes

January 30, 2018 at 6:48 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its – Sweet and Savory Apple Recipes. If you love Apples as much as I do, you are going to love these recipes! Diabetic Friendly Sweet and Savory Apple Recipes like; Amazing Apple Tart, Apple-Glazed Chicken with Spinach, and Cherry-Apple Cobbler. Find these recipes and more all at the Diabetic living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

Sweet and Savory Apple Recipes
Apples are a super-versatile, budget-friendly, and fiber-packed fruit. We’ve included our favorite low-carb apple dessert recipes (think pies, crisps, and cobblers) and a few apple-infused side- and main-dish recipes, too. Best of all, these yummy apple dishes have been developed with a diabetic diet in mind.

Amazing Apple Tart
Juicy baked apples, a tender biscuitlike crust, and a sweet and spicy sauce add up to this diabetes-friendly dessert. That is truly amazing!…..

Apple-Glazed Chicken with Spinach
A drizzling of lemon-accented apple glaze lightly sweetens the braised spinach-topped chicken in this delightful dish…..

Cherry-Apple Cobbler
Make sure the fruit filling is hot when you spoon the biscuit batter over it. That way, the bottom of the “cobbled biscuit” will be thoroughly cooked…..

* Click the link below to get all the Sweet and Savory Apple Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/dessert/sweet-and-savory-apple-recipes

One of America’s Favorite Halloween Treats – Caramel Apple

October 27, 2013 at 10:50 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 6 Comments
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Caramel apple with peanuts

Caramel apple with peanuts

 

Caramel apples or taffy apples (not to be confused with candy apples) are created by dipping or rolling apples-on-a-stick in hot caramel, sometimes then rolling them in nuts or other small savories or confections, and allowing them to cool. Generally, they are called caramel apples when only caramel is applied and taffy apples for when there are further ingredients such as peanuts applied.

 

 
For high-volume production of caramel apples, a sheet of caramel can be wrapped around the apple, followed by heating of the apple to melt the caramel evenly onto it. This creates a harder caramel that is easier to transport but more difficult to eat. Caramel apple production at home usually involves melting pre-purchased caramel candies for dipping, or making a homemade caramel from ingredients like brown sugar, butter, and vanilla. Homemade caramel generally results in a softer, creamier coating.
In recent years, it has become increasingly popular to decorate caramel apples for holidays like Halloween. Methods used to do this include applying sugar or salt to softened caramel, dipping cooled, hardened apples in white or milk chocolate, or painting designs onto finished caramel apples with white chocolate colored with food coloring.
Classically, the preferred apples for use in caramel apples are tart, crisp apples such as Granny Smith or Fuji apples. Softer, grainy-textured apples can also be used, but are not preferred.

 

Bags of caramels are commonly sold during the Autumn months in America for making caramel apples.

Bags of caramels are commonly sold during the Autumn months in America for making caramel apples.

 
Caramel apples are usually consumed as treats at autumn festivals such as Halloween or Bonfire Night, in the wake of the annual apple harvest.

 

 

Baked Apple Turnovers

July 2, 2013 at 9:43 AM | Posted in baking, dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly | Leave a comment
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A delicious and a bit healthier version of Baked Apple Turnovers.

 

 

Baked Apple TurnoversBaked Apple Turnovers

Ingredients:

4 Granny Smith apples, peeled and chopped
1/3 cup water
1/4 cup SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 (15-ounce) container Pillsbury Refrigerated Pie Crusts
1 egg white, lightly beaten or 1/4 cup Egg Beater’s Egg Whites

 

 

Directions:
Cook apples and water in a medium saucepan over medium heat, covered, stirring occasionally and breaking up apples with the back of a spoon, 10 to 12 minutes or until apples form a coarse puree. Add SPLENDA® Granulated Sweetener and flour; cook 2 to 3 additional minutes, stirring constantly until SPLENDA® Granulated Sweetener dissolves and mixture is thickened. Stir in cinnamon. Spoon apple mixture into a bowl to cool slightly.
Preheat oven to 425°F (225°C). Coat a baking sheet with cooking spray; set aside.
Unroll piecrusts; cut each one into four wedges. Roll each wedge into a 6-inch circle. Place 3 level tablespoons apple mixture on each circle; moisten edges of dough with water and fold dough over to form a half-moon shape. Crimp to seal, and cut vents to release steam. Place on prepared pan; brush tops with egg white.
Bake 15 to 20 minutes or until turnovers are browned. Cool turnovers on a wire rack 10 minutes before serving. Serve warm or at room temperature.
Makes 8 turnovers.
Photograph courtesy of Splenda.

The Big Switch to Honeycrisp Apples!

December 11, 2012 at 11:21 AM | Posted in fruits | 2 Comments
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I’ve ate Gala Apples for as long as I can remember. I always have a quart freezer bag full of sliced Apples in the frig. It seemed good quality Gala’s were becoming more difficult to find so I’ve been trying other Apples. So after trying others I’ve made the switch to Honeycrisp Apples!I love the texture and sweetness of them. I’ve got a bag of them sliced up in the frig as I write this. I left a little history on both Apples below.
Honeycrisp Apples

Honeycrisp (Malus domestica ‘Honeycrisp’) is an apple cultivar developed at the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station’s

Honeycrisp Apple

Honeycrisp Apple

Horticultural Research Center at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. Designated in 1960 as the MN 1711, and released in 1991, the Honeycrisp, once slated to be discarded, has rapidly become a prized commercial commodity, as its sweetness, firmness, and tartness make it an ideal apple for eating raw. The Honeycrisp also retains its pigment well and boasts a relatively long shelf life when stored in cool, dry conditions.
U.S. Plant Patent 7197 and Report 225-1992 (AD-MR-5877-B) from the Horticultural Research Center indicate that the Honeycrisp is a hybrid of the apple cultivars Macoun and Honeygold. However, genetic fingerprinting conducted by a group of researchers in 2004, which included those who were later attributed on the patent, determined that neither of these cultivars is a parent of the Honeycrisp, but that the Keepsake (another apple developed by the same University of Minnesota crossbreeding program) is one of the parents. The other parent has not been identified, but it might be a numbered selection that could have been discarded since. According to the US Patent office, the Patent was filed November 7, 1988. As a result, the patent has now expired.
For the sake of commercial production, Honeycrisp apple trees are not self-fruitful, as trees grown from the seeds of Honeycrisp apples will be hybrids of Honeycrisp and the pollinator.
In 2006, Andersen Elementary School in Bayport petitioned for the Minnesota state legislature to make the Honeycrisp apple the state fruit; the bill was passed in May 2006.
As a result of the Honeycrisp apple’s growing popularity, the government of Nova Scotia has encouraged its local orchards to increase their supplies through the Honeycrisp Orchard Renewal Program. From 2005 until 2010, apple producers in Nova Scotia could replace older apple trees with Honeycrisp trees at a subsidized rate. Many orchards in the Annapolis Valley on the Bay of Fundy have mature trees and plentiful supplies of Honeycrisps throughout the harvest season. Apple growers in New Zealand’s South Island have begun growing Honeycrisp to supply consumers during the US off-season.[5] The first batch of New Zealand-grown Honeycrisp cultivars being introduced to the North American market have been branded using the “HoneyCrunch” registered trademark.
Gala Apples

Gala is a clonally propagated apple with a mild and sweet flavor. Gala apples ranked at number 2 in 2006 on the US Apple Association’s

Gala Apple

Gala Apple

list of most popular apples, after Red Delicious and before Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, and Fuji (in order).

Gala apples are small and are usually red with a portion being greenish or yellow-green, vertically striped. Gala apples are fairly resistant to bruising and are sweet, grainy, with a mild flavor and a thinner skin than most apples. Quality indices include firmness, crispness, and sweetness.

The first Gala apple tree was one of many seedlings resulting from a cross between a Golden Delicious and a Kidd’s Orange Red planted in New Zealand in the 1930s by orchardist J.H. Kidd. Donald W. McKenzie, an employee of Stark Bros Nursery, obtained a US plant patent for the cultivar on October 15, 1974. The variety is also an increasingly popular option for UK top fruit farmers. It is a relatively new introduction to the UK, first planted in commercial volumes during the 1980s. The variety now represents about 20% of the total volume of the commercial production of eating apples grown in the UK, often replacing Cox’s Orange Pippin.

Bacon-Wrapped Apple-Cheddar Rolls

November 10, 2011 at 2:44 PM | Posted in bacon, baking, cheese, Food, Kraft Cheese | 1 Comment
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Ran across this delicious sounding fall recipe earlier today. I plan on making these in the next couple of days! I made some changes from the original recipe to make to lower the calories and carbs.

INGREDIENTS
1 to 2 Granny Smith Apples, cut into 16 (1/4-inch) slices
1 tablespoon packed Brown Sugar or Splenda equivalent (1/2 tablespoon)
Dash Salt
1 can Pillsbury® refrigerated Reduced Fat Crescent Dinner Rolls
8 Slices (1/4 inch) Kraft 2% Extra-Sharp Cheddar Cheese, cut in half
16 slices packaged precooked Turkey Bacon

DIRECTIONS
1. Heat oven to 375°F. Line cookie sheet with nonstick foil, parchment paper or silicone baking mat. (Some cheese will melt out during baking so this will make cleanup easier.)
2. In medium bowl, toss apple slices with brown sugar; sprinkle with salt.
3. On cutting board, unroll dough; separate dough into 8 triangles. From center of longest side to opposite point, cut each triangle in half, making 16 triangles.
4. Place 1 cheese slice on shortest side of each dough triangle; top each with 1 apple slice. Fold sides of dough triangle up slightly; wrap dough around apple and cheese.
5. Wrap 1 bacon slice around outside of each dough roll-up, making sure ends of bacon are on bottom and slightly tucked in. Place on cookie sheet.

6 Bake 12 minutes or until golden brown. Immediately remove from cookie sheet. Serve warm.

Raw bacon doesn’t work because it won’t have enough time to cook. You need to use precooked for this recipe to work. Precooked bacon can be found at the supermarket.
If you precook your own bacon, make sure you don’t cook it until it’s crispy. You want it to be pliable so it can wrap around the dough.

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