Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Apple Cider Cinnamon Turkey Toast

January 11, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Apple Cider Cinnamon Turkey Toast. This one is made using the Jennie – O Apple Cider Cinnamon Turkey Breast along with Apple Butter, Brie Cheese, Granny Smith Apples, Arugula, all served on toasted Multi-Grain Bread. You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Apple Cider Cinnamon Turkey Toast
Warm up to the flavors of fall with Apple Cider Cinnamon Turkey Toast. Perfect for crisp autumn mornings, this flavorful toast recipe is ideal for breakfast or brunch. With a sweet and savory mix of apple, brie cheese, arugula and our new thinly sliced JENNIE-O® Apple Cider Cinnamon Turkey, you’ll be in the fall spirit after one bite.

INGREDIENTS
2 tablespoons apple butter
2 slices multi-grain bread, toasted
2 ounces thinly sliced JENNIE-O® Apple Cider Cinnamon Turkey, from the service deli
1 ounce brie cheese, sliced
4 Granny Smith apple slices
¼ cup fresh arugula leaves

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 425°F.
2) Spread apple butter on 1 side of each bread slice. Layer 1 bread slice with turkey, cheese and apple slices.
3) Place sandwich on baking sheet. Bake 2 to 3 minutes or until cheese is slightly melted. Add arugula and remaining bread slice.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 420
Protein 27g
Carbohydrates 55g
Fiber 7g
Sugars 29g
Fat 11g
Cholestero l55mg
Sodium 890mg
Saturated Fat5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1236-apple-cider-cinnamon-turkey-toast

Jennie – O Apple Cider Cinnamon Turkey Breast
What’s better than a cup of hot apple cider on a fall day? Our new Apple Cider Cinnamon Turkey Breast. It’s the perfect addition to your holiday table. Whether it’s sliced thin for lunch or cut thick for dinner, adding the flavors of fall to your favorite recipes just got easier.

* GLUTEN FREE
* PREMIUM SEASONED
Ask for this product in the deli section of your grocery store.

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS
FULLY COOKED – READY TO EAT:
This product is fully cooked and is “Ready To Eat”.

NUTRITION INFORMATION
Serving Size 56 g
Calories 70
Calories From Fat 10
Total Fat 1.0 g
Saturated Fat. 0 g
Trans Fat. 0 g
Cholesterol 25 mg
Sodium 480 mg
Total Carbohydrates 2 g
Dietary Fiber 0 g
Sugars 2 g
Protein 13 g

INGREDIENTS
Seasoning Ingredients: Sugar, Brown Sugar, Spices (Including Cinnamon), Natural Flavoring, Malic Acid. Ingredients: Turkey Breast Meat, Turkey Broth, Contains 2% Or Less Seasoning (Sugar, Spice Extractives, Apple Cider), Salt, Turbinado Sugar, Vinegar, Rosemary Extract, Baking Soda.

https://www.jennieo.com/products/260-apple-cider-cinnamon-turkey-breast

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One of America’s Favorites – Caramel Apple

October 15, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Caramel apple with peanuts

Caramel apples or taffy apples are created by dipping or rolling apples-on-a-stick in hot caramel, sometimes then rolling them in nuts or other small savories or confections, and allowing them to cool. Generally, they are called caramel apples when only caramel is applied and taffy apples for when there are further ingredients such as peanuts applied.

For high-volume production of caramel apples, a sheet of caramel can be wrapped around the apple, followed by heating the apple to melt the caramel evenly onto it. This creates a harder caramel that is easier to transport but more difficult to eat. Caramel apple production at home usually involves melting pre-purchased caramel candies for dipping or making a homemade caramel from ingredients like corn syrup, brown sugar, butter, and vanilla. Homemade caramel generally results in a softer, creamier coating.

Bags of caramels are commonly sold during the Autumn months in America for making caramel apples.

In recent years, it has become increasingly popular to decorate caramel apples for holidays like Halloween. Methods used to do this include applying sugar or salt to softened caramel, dipping cooled, hardened apples in white or milk chocolate, or painting designs onto finished caramel apples with white chocolate colored with food coloring.

Classically, the preferred apples for use in caramel apples are tart, crisp apples such as Granny Smith or Fuji apples. Softer, grainy-textured apples can also be used, but are not preferred.

In addition to caramel apples, manufacturers and consumers have started to coat apples in chocolate syrup, peanut butter, etc. and adding toppings such as crushed peanuts, pretzels, mini M&Ms, Reese’s Pieces, coconut flakes, and mini chocolate chips. Candy apple shops and candy apple bars have started to pop up in bigger cities, at weddings and parties to allow people to enjoy the apple with the dipping sauces and toppings they prefer.

* I always think of these around the Halloween Season. When I was growing up my Grandparents owned a small neighborhood store. Every Halloween Season my Grandmother would just make endless amounts of Caramel Apple with crushed Peanuts on them. So Good!!

 

Diabetic Dish of the Week of the Week – Chicken Normandy.

December 16, 2017 at 12:49 PM | Posted in CooksRecipes, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week of the Week is – Chicken Normandy. Diabetic-friendly recipe with Chicken braised in Apple Cider. Equal replaces the Sugar in the recipe. You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy recipes at one of my favorite recipe sites’ the CooksRecipes website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

Chicken Normandy
Diabetic-friendly, low-fat and low-sugar chicken braised in apple cider or juice and sage.

Recipe Ingredients:
Butter-flavored vegetable cooking spray
4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 4-ounces each)
Salt and ground black pepper, to taste
2 medium Granny Smith apples, unpeeled, cored, sliced
6 green onions and tops, sliced
2/3 cup apple cider or unsweetened apple juice
2 teaspoons chicken bouillon crystals
1 1/2 teaspoons dried sage leaves
2/3 cup fat-free half-and-half or 2% milk
2 teaspoons all-purpose flour
1 3/4 teaspoons Equal® for Recipes or 6 packets Equal® sweetener or 1/4 cup Equal® Spoonful™
Sage or parsley sprigs, as garnish

Cooking Directions:
1 – Spray large skillet with cooking spray; heat over medium heat until hot. Sauté chicken breasts until browned, 3 to 5 minutes on each side. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
2 – Add apples, onions, apple cider, bouillon, and sage to skillet; heat to boiling. Reduce heat and simmer, covered, until chicken is tender, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove chicken and apples to serving platter.
3 – Continue simmering cider mixture until almost gone. Mix half-and-half, flour, and Equal® in glass measuring cup; pour into skillet. Heat to boiling; boil, stirring constantly, until thickened, about 1 minute. Season to taste with salt and pepper; pour over chicken and apples. Garnish with sage.
Makes 4 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/4 of recipe): 240 cal., 29 g pro., 25 g carbo., 2 g fat, 66 mg chol., 676 mg sodium.

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/chicken-normandy-diabetic-recipe.html

Diabetic Dish of the Week – WALNUT-STUFFED TURKEY BREAST WITH CIDER GRAVY

November 21, 2017 at 6:21 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – WALNUT-STUFFED TURKEY BREAST WITH CIDER GRAVY. The recipe is from the Diabetic Gourmet website. The Diabetic Gourmet site has a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly recipes for all meals and occasions. You’ll also find Diabetes Management tips and News. It’s another one of my favorite sites! Enjoy and eat Healthy! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

 

WALNUT-STUFFED TURKEY BREAST WITH CIDER GRAVY

Ingredients

1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored and quartered
3/4 lb. large shallots, quartered
3 cups fat-free, reduced sodium chicken broth
1/2 cup apple cider
1 Tbsp. apple cider vinegar
2 Tbsp. flour
Salt and ground black pepper
1 cup roasted walnuts
1 1/2 tsp. dried thyme
1/4 tsp. ground sage
2 tsp. canola oil, divided
1/2 tsp. salt
Freshly ground black pepper
6-7 lb. whole turkey breast

Directions

1 – Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.
In food processor, pulse roasted nuts with thyme and sage until coarsely ground. Add 1 teaspoon oil, 1 tablespoon water, 1/2 teaspoon salt and generous pinch of pepper. Whirl to a grainy paste.
2 – Using hands, separate skin from turkey breast, taking care not to tear. Lift skin and push half of walnut paste under skin on each side of breast. Pull skin back into place and spread nut mixture in an even layer by smoothing the skin, using gentle pressure. Coat skin with remaining 1 teaspoon of oil.
3 – Place breast upside-down on rack in roasting pan. Place apple and as many shallots as fit into cavity. Push three short bamboo skewers across opening to hold the filling in cavity, and turn breast right side up. Add broth and remaining shallots to pan.
4 – Roast breast for 30 minutes. If breast is browned, tent loosely with foil. Reduce heat to 350 degrees and continue roasting until instant-read thermometer inserted almost to the bone registers 160 degrees, about 60 minutes. To re-crisp skin, remove foil for last 20 minutes. Transfer turkey to platter. Strain pan juices into measuring cup, discarding solids. Skim off as much fat as possible.
5 – Set roasting pan on stove over medium-high heat. Pour in cider and vinegar, and boil, scraping up brown bits sticking to pan with wooden spoon. When liquid is reduced to 1/4 cup, off heat, whisk in flour. Return pan to heat, and stir until boiling gravy thickens, about 5 minutes. Pour into a sauceboat.
6 – Remove turkey skin. Lift off walnut mixture, and set aside. Slice breast, arranging meat on a warmed platter. Set walnut stuffing beside it. Add apples and shallots from cavity, if desired. Serve, passing gravy separately.

Recipe Yield: Makes 10 servings.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 300
Fat: 9 grams
Saturated Fat: 1 grams
Fiber: 1 grams
Sodium: 200 milligrams
Protein: 44 grams
Carbohydrates: 11 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/walnut-stuffed-turkey-breast-with-cider-gravy

Maple Ginger Chicken Thighs w/ Roasted Butternut Squash, Seasoned Pinto Beans, and….

October 14, 2017 at 5:04 PM | Posted in beans, chicken | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Maple Ginger Chicken Thighs w/ Roasted Butternut Squash, Seasoned Pinto Beans, and Baked Multi Grain Bread

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I prepared Scrambled Eggs, toasted 2 slices of Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread (lightly buttered), and a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Mostly sunny and 81 degrees out today. After Breakfast I went to McDonald’s to pick up Mom and Dad’s Breakfast. Later went to the ATM and mailed a couple of letters. After Lunch I got the cart out and did some yard work. Then took a ride around the neighborhood, really nice out! For Dinner tonight a new recipe for Chicken Thighs. I prepared Maple Ginger Chicken Thighs w/ Roasted Butternut Squash, Seasoned Pinto Beans, and Baked Multi Grain Bread.

 

 

Tried a new recipe I cam across in the newspaper Wednesday, Maple Ginger Chicken Thighs. Looked and sounded good so I’m giving it a try. To make the dish I’ll need; 1 Shallot (finely sliced), 3/4 cup Apple Cider, 1/2 cup Maple Grove Farms Sugar Free Maple Flavor Syrup, 1 tablespoon finely grated Ginger, 1 tablespoon Apple Cider Vinegar, 1 teaspoon chopped fresh Thyme leaves (plus 5 sprigs for the roasting pan), 3/4 teaspoon Sea Salt, 1/2 teaspoon ground Black Pepper, 8 boneless and skinless Chicken Thighs, and 3 medium Granny Smith Apples (cored and quartered). I substituted the Maple Sugar Syrup with Maple Grove Farms Sugar Free Maple Flavor Syrup, I used Sea Salt instead of the normal Salt, I used Granny Smith Apples, and I used the Skinless and Boneless Chicken Thighs instead the bone in and Skin still on Thighs.

 

Now to prepare it; I start by getting a medium bowl. Then whisk the shallot, cider, maple syrup, grated ginger, apple cider vinegar, chopped thyme leaves, kosher salt and ground black pepper. Next place the chicken in a large resealable plastic bag. Pour the marinade into the bag, seal it and refrigerate for 12-24 hours, turning one to coat all pieces. I marinated the chicken overnight.

 

 

 

 

Next day; Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Remove chicken from marinade and arrange pieces, skin side up, in a 9-by-13 inch baking dish. Tuck the apples and thyme sprigs among the chicken pieces. Pour the marinade over top. Bake, basting occasionally, about 1 hour, until chicken is cooked. Check the thighs with a meat thermometer, should be 165 degrees internal temperature. Serve the chicken and apples with the sauce spooned over top.Winner, Winner Chicken Dinner! Excellent Keeper Recipe! Chicken was tender and moist and the Syrup along with all of the other ingredients add incredible flavor! And it’s Parent Approved, Mom and Dad both loved it!

 

Then for one side I prepared some Roasted Butternut Squash, easy recipe for some delicious Butternut Squash! And this too has quickly become a favorite. I purchased 1 small package of Diced Butternut Squash at Kroger. They sell packages of it that they dice up. This is a lot easier than peeling and seeding one yourself, especially if you don’t have a good knife to cut it. I’ll need; 1 package of Diced Butternut Squash, Crumbled Bacon Bits, 1 tablespoons Extra Light Olive Oil, 1 1/2 teaspoons McCormick Grinder Sea Salt, and 1 teaspoon McCormick Grinder Peppercorn Medley.

 

To prepare it; Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Place the Squash on a sheet pan and drizzle with the Olive Oil, Salt, and Peppercorn and toss well. Arrange the squash in one layer and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the Squash is tender, turning once with a spatula. And done, very easy to prepare. With the small amount of Seasoning and Olive Oil, it really brings out the flavor of Butternut Squash!

 

 

 

For another side an item I haven’t had in a while, Margaret Holmes Seasoned Pinto Beans. I purchased a couple of cans of this at a nearby Walmart, they carry a good selection of a lot of the Margaret Holmes Products. To prepare it just empty the contents into a medium saucepan. Cover it and bring it to a boil. Stir and reduce the heat to slow simmer and serve when ready. And I have delicious side dish! I love Beans of all kinds and these Seasoned Pinto Beans are delicious, love the Seasoning. I also baked a loaf of LaBrea Multi-Grain Bread. For Dessert/Snack later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn and a Diet peach Snapple to drink.

 

 

 

Maple Ginger Chicken Thighs

INGREDIENTS:
1 shallot, finely sliced
3/4 cup apple cider
1/2 cup dark pure maple syrup
1 tablespoon finely grated ginger
1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme leaves, plus 5 sprigs for the roasting pan
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
8 bone-in chicken thighs
3 medium apples, cored and quartered

DIRECTIONS:
1 – In a medium bowl whisk shallot, cider, maple syrup, grated ginger, apple cider vinegar, chopped thyme leaves, kosher salt and ground black pepper.
2 – Place the chicken in a large resealable plastic bag. Pour marinade into the bag, seal it and refrigerate for 12-24 hours, turning one to coat all pieces.
3 – Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Remove chicken from mainade and arrange pieces, skin side up, in a 9-by-13 inch baking dish. Tuckapples and thyme sprigs among the chicken pieces. Pour the marinade over top. Bake, basting occasionaly, about 1 hour, until chicken is cooked. Check with a meat thermometer, should be 165 degrees. Serve the chicken and apples with the sauce spooned over top.

 

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Baked Cinnamon Applesauce

August 2, 2016 at 4:55 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is Baked Cinnamon Applesauce. Granny Smith Apples and Royal Gala Apples make this version of Applesauce. It calls for Equal in place of Sugar. You can find this recipe on the CooksRecipes website. Cooks has a great selection of recipes for all tastes and cuisines so check it out soon! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

 

Baked Cinnamon Applesauce
A unique applesauce that bakes in your oven. Citrus flavors enhance the 2 different apple varieties used. Delicious enough to serve as a healthy dessert.

Recipe Ingredients:Cooksrecipes 2

1 orange
1 lemon
3 pounds Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, quartered
3 pounds Royal Gala or Braeburn apples, peeled, cored, quartered
3 tablespoons stick butter or margarine, cut into small pieces
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 cup Equal® Spoonful*

Cooking Directions:

1 – Grate peel of orange and lemon. Place in 3-quart glass or non-corrosive casserole with cover. Squeeze juice from orange and lemon; add to grated peel in casserole. Add apples, butter, cinnamon and nutmeg. Toss to combine.
2 – Cover with casserole lid. Bake in preheated 350°F oven 1 1/2 hours. Remove from oven and let stand covered 30 minutes. Carefully remove lid. Stir to break up apples. Stir in Equal®.
Serve warm or refrigerate, covered, several hours before serving.
Makes 12 servings.

*May substitute 12 packets Equal sweetener.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/12 of recipe): calories 129, protein 0 g, carbohydrate 27 g, fat 3 g, cholesterol 8 mg, sodium 1 mg.

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/baked_cinnamon_applesauce_recipe.html

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Baked Cinnamon Applesauce

September 22, 2015 at 4:57 AM | Posted in diabetes, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is Baked Cinnamon Applesauce. It comes off the CooksRecipes website which has a fantastic selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes. http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

 

Baked Cinnamon Applesauce

A unique applesauce that bakes in your oven. Citrus flavors enhance the 2 different apple varieties used. Delicious enough to serve as a healthy dessert.

Recipe Ingredients:Cooksrecipes 2

1 orange
1 lemon
3 pounds Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, quartered
3 pounds Royal Gala or Braeburn apples, peeled, cored, quartered
3 tablespoons stick butter or margarine, cut into small pieces
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 cup Equal® Spoonful*

Cooking Directions:

1 – Grate peel of orange and lemon. Place in 3-quart glass or non-corrosive casserole with cover. Squeeze juice from orange and lemon; add to grated peel in casserole. Add apples, butter, cinnamon and nutmeg. Toss to combine.
2 – Cover with casserole lid. Bake in preheated 350°F oven 1 1/2 hours. Remove from oven and let stand covered 30 minutes. Carefully remove lid. Stir to break up apples. Stir in Equal®.
3 – Serve warm or refrigerate, covered, several hours before serving.
Makes 12 servings.
*May substitute 12 packets Equal sweetener.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/12 of recipe): calories 129, protein 0 g, carbohydrate 27 g, fat 3 g, cholesterol 8 mg, sodium 1 mg.

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/baked_cinnamon_applesauce_recipe.html

Types of Apples: The Best Apples for Baking, Cooking and Eating

September 10, 2015 at 5:00 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Here’s some great tips, info, and recipes on Fall’s Favorite Harvest the Apple. From the EatingWell website it’s Types of Apples: The Best Apples for Baking, Cooking and Eating. http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Types of Apples: The Best Apples for Baking, Cooking and EatingEatingWell2

Find out which types of apples are best for apple pie and more apple recipes.
All apples are not created equal—at least when it comes to cooking vs. eating them fresh. But regardless of variety, they’re all good for you. A medium apple (3-inch diameter) contains 4 grams of fiber; a large apple (3 1/4-inch diameter) has 5 grams of fiber. Apples also offer a bit of vitamin C and potassium.

 

 

So what apples are best for your lunchbox and what apples are best suited for your apple pie? Well, that depends.

The Best Apples for Baking & Best Apples for Cooking
In the EatingWell Test Kitchen, we’re partial to McIntosh and Granny Smith for baking. When the softer McIntosh mixes with the more toothsome Granny Smith, presto! You’ve got yourself the perfect apple pie….

 

 

McIntosh: The tender white flesh is crisp when freshly harvested, but soon adopts a softer consistency, making it perfect for cooking into pies or sauce. Macs are sweet and juicy with a pleasant tanginess…

Granny Smith: This apple is sharp and tart and its flavor holds up well in recipes with spicy notes; the flesh is firm enough to retain its shape when cooked……

 

 

The Worst Apples for Cooking & Worst Apples for Baking
Red Delicious: These apples are sweet, crisp and grainy. They lack a tart element and a rich apple flavor, which is what makes apple pie so great. You’re better off leaving them out of your pie……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Types of Apples: The Best Apples for Baking, Cooking and Eating
http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_and_techniques/types_of_apples_the_best_apples_for_baking_cooking_and_eating

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

September 3, 2015 at 5:19 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | Leave a comment
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An Apple a day…..

 

When buying apples, choose those without any bruises or soft, mushy spots. They should be firm for their specific variety (a McIntosh will not be as firm as a Granny Smith). Look for fruit with shiny skin—dull skin hints at a lack of crispness and flavor.

Apple of the Week – Granny Smith Apples

August 27, 2015 at 4:59 AM | Posted in Apple of the Week | 3 Comments
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Malus 'Granny Smith'

Malus ‘Granny Smith’

The Granny Smith is a tip-bearing apple cultivar, which originated in Australia in 1868. It is named after Maria Ann Smith, who propagated the cultivar from a chance seedling. The tree is thought to be a hybrid of Malus sylvestris, the European Wild Apple, with the domestic apple M. domestica as the polleniser. The fruit has hard, light green skin and a crisp, juicy flesh.

Granny Smiths go from being completely green to turning yellow when overripe. The acidity mellows significantly on ripening, and it takes on a balanced flavor.

 

 

Maria Ann "Granny" Smith (1799–1870)

Maria Ann “Granny” Smith (1799–1870)

The Granny Smith cultivar originated in Eastwood, New South Wales, Australia (now a suburb of Sydney) in 1868. Its discoverer, Maria Ann Smith, had emigrated to the district from Beckley, East Sussex in 1839 with her husband Thomas. They purchased a small orchard in the area in 1855-1856 and began cultivating fruit, for which the area was a well known centre in colonial Australia. Smith bore numerous children and was a prominent figure in the district, earning the nickname “Granny” Smith in her advanced years.

The origin of the Granny Smith apple is definitively documented, and the first description was not published until 1924. In that year, Farmer and Settler published the account of a local historian who had interviewed two men who had known Maria. One of those interviewed recalled that in 1868 he (then twelve years old) and his father had been invited to Smith’s farm to inspect a chance seedling that had sprung near a creek. Smith had dumped there among the ferns the remains of French crab-apples that had been grown in Tasmania. Another story recounted that Smith had been testing French crab-apples for cooking, and throwing the apple cores out her window as she worked, found that the new cultivar sprung up underneath her kitchen windowsill. Whatever the case, Smith’s husband was an invalid and she took it upon herself to propagate the new cultivar on her property, finding the apples good for cooking and for general consumption. Having “all the appearances of a cooking apple”, they were not tart but instead were “sweet and crisp to eat”. She took a stall at Sydney’s George Street market, where the apples stored “exceptionally well and became popular” and “once a week sold her produce there.”

Smith died only a couple years after her discovery in 1870, but her work had been noticed by other local planters. Edward Gallard was one such planter, who extensively planted Granny Smith trees on his property and bought the Smith farm when Thomas died in 1876. Gallard was successful in marketing the apple locally, but it did not receive widespread attention until 1890. In that year, it was exhibited as “Smith’s Seedling” at the Castle Hill Agricultural and Horticultural Show, and the following year it won the prize for cooking apples under the name “Granny Smith’s Seedling”. The apple was successful and the following year many were exhibiting Granny Smith apples at horticultural shows.

In 1895 the New South Wales Department of Agriculture recognised the cultivar and had begun growing them at the Government Experimental Station in Bathurst, New South Wales, recommending the gazette its properties as a late-picking cooking apple for potential export. Over the following years the government actively promoted the apple, leading to its widespread adoption. Its worldwide fame grew from the fact that it could be picked from March and stored until November. Enterprising fruit merchants in 1890s and 1900s experimented with methods to transport the apples overseas in cold storage. Because of its excellent shelf life the Granny Smith could be exported long distances and most times of the year, at a time when Australian food exports were growing dramatically on the back of international demand. Granny Smiths were exported in enormous quantities after the First World War, and by 1975, 40 percent of Australia’s apple crop was Granny Smith.

By this time it was being grown intensely elsewhere in the Southern Hemisphere, as well as in France and the United States. However, apples are genetic hybrids that produce new genetic variations in their seedlings. Because the Granny Smith is a chance (and rare) mutation, the seeds of the apple, when grown, tend to produce a tart green apple with a much less appealing taste. To preserve the exact genetic variation cutting and grafting are required. Thus, like the navel orange and the Cavendish banana, all the Granny Smith apples grown today are cuttings from the original Smith tree in Sydney. The advent of the Granny Smith Apple is now celebrated annually in Eastwood with the Granny Smith Festival.

 

 

Granny Smith apples.

Granny Smith apples.

Granny Smith apples are light green in color. They are commonly used in pie baking, can be eaten raw, and at least one company (Woodchuck Hard Cider) makes Granny Smith varietal cider.

It is moderately susceptible to fire blight and is highly prone to scab, powdery mildew, and cedar apple rust.

Granny Smith is much more easily preserved in storage than other apples, a factor which has greatly contributed to its success in export markets. Its long storage life has been attributed to its fairly low levels of ethylene production, and in the right conditions Granny Smiths can be stored without loss of quality for as long as a year. This cultivar needs fewer winter chill hours and a longer season to mature the fruit, so it is favored for the milder areas of the apple growing regions. However, they are susceptible to superficial scald and bitter pit. Superficial scald may be controlled by treatment with diphenylamine before storage. It can also be controlled with low-oxygen storage. Pit can be controlled with calcium sprays during the growing season and with postharvest calcium dips.

 

 

Granny Smith is one of the several apple cultivars that are high in antioxidant activity, and they boast the highest concentration of phenols amongst the apple breeds. Some sources recommend Granny Smiths (among other apples) as a particularly efficient source of antioxidants, particularly the flavonoids cyanidin and epicatechin, especially if eaten with the skin intact. Granny Smiths are also naturally low in calories and high in dietary fiber and potassium, making them commonly recommended as a component of healthy and weight-loss diets.

According to the US Apple Association website it is one of the fifteen most popular apple cultivars in the United States.

 

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