Diabetic Dessert of the Week – MINT CHEESECAKE BARS

August 8, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dessert of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is – MINT CHEESECAKE BARS. Replacing Sugar in the Dessert will be Splenda sweetener. Graham Crackers, Reduced Fat Cream Cheese, Eggs, Semisweet Chocolate are just some of the other ingredients that you’ll be needing. The recipe comes from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

MINT CHEESECAKE BARS

Recipe Yield: 20 Servings

Ingredients

Crust

2 tablespoons SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1-1/4 cups graham cracker crumbs
1/3 cup light butter, melted
Filling

12 ounces reduced fat cream cheese
1/3 cup SPLENDA® No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon mint extract
2 drops green food color
Chocolate Drizzle
12 (1 ounce) squares semisweet chocolate

Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
2 – Spray one eight-inch square pan with baking spray. Set aside
3 – Mix crust ingredients together in a mixing bowl. Mix well. Press into prepared pan. Bake 8 minutes or until firm.
4 – Mix cream cheese and SPLENDA® Granulated Sweetener together until smooth. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition. Add vanilla, mint extract and green food coloring; mix well.
5 – Pour over prepared crust.
6 – Bake in preheated oven for 30 minutes, or until firm.
7 – Refrigerate cheesecake bars 2 hours or until chilled and firm. Melt chocolate and drizzle over the top.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 170
Calories from fat: 100
Fat: 11 grams
Saturated Fat: 6 grams
Fiber: 1 grams
Sodium: 105 milligrams
Cholesterol: 35 milligrams
Protein: 4 grams
Carbohydrates: 15 grams
Sugars: 11 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/mint-cheesecake-bars

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Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Italian Cheesecake

May 23, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is – Italian Cheesecake. Some of the ingredients you’ll be using are; Graham Crackers, Fat Free Cream Cheese, Sugar Substitute, Fat Free Ricotta Cheese, and Egg Substitute. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website which has a huge selection of recipes to please all tastes, diets, and cuisines. Check it out today! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Italian Cheesecake
Ingredients
9 whole graham crackers, plus additional pieces for garnish
1/3 cup packed brown sugar
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
2 packages (8 ounces each) fat-free cream cheese, softened
1 1/2 cups sugar substitute*
1 container (15 ounces) fat-free ricotta cheese
2 eggs
1/2 cup cholesterol-free egg substitute
3 tablespoons cornstarch
3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 cups reduced-fat sour cream
Fresh strawberries (optional)
Fresh mint leaves (optional)

Directions
1 – Spray 9-inch springform pan or deep-dish pie pan with nonstick cooking spray.

2 – Place graham crackers in resealable food storage bag; crush into fine crumbs with rolling pin. Mix crumbs and brown sugar in small bowl. Stir in butter until crumbs are moistened. Press crumb mixture into bottom and 1 inch up side of prepared pan. Refrigerate crust while preparing filling.

3 – Preheat oven to 300°F. Beat cream cheese and sugar substitute in large bowl with electric mixer at medium speed until smooth. Add ricotta; beat until blended. Slowly add eggs and egg substitute; beat until well blended. Beat in cornstarch, flour, and vanilla. Beat in sour cream just until blended. Pour filling into prepared crust; place pan on baking sheet.

4 – Bake 1 hour and 30 minutes to 1 hour and 40 minutes or until top of cheesecake is golden and just set. Cool completely in pan on wire rack. Refrigerate 8 hours or overnight. Garnish with strawberries, mint, and graham cracker pieces.

*Note: This recipe was tested using sucralose-based sugar substitute.

Yield: 18 servings.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 154 calories, Carbohydrates: 15 g, Protein: 10 g, Fat: 7 g, Saturated Fat: 3 g, Cholesterol: 47 mg, Sodium: 296 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/italian-cheesecake/

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – ALMOND CHEESECAKE BARS

May 9, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dessert of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is – ALMOND CHEESECAKE BARS. Graham Crackers, Almonds, Reduced Fat Cream Cheese, Eggs, Reduced Fat Sour Cream are just some of the ingredients that make up this week’s recipe. Splenda No Calorie Sweetener replaces the Sugar in the recipe. The Dessert is 120 calories and 8 carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes. Well Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

ALMOND CHEESECAKE BARS

Ingredients

Crust:

1/4 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1 1/4 cups graham cracker or vanilla wafer crumbs
1/3 cup light butter, melted
1/4 cup toasted sliced almonds, finely ground
Filling:

12 ounces reduced fat cream cheese
1/2 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
2 large eggs
1/4 cup reduced fat sour cream
2-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract
1/4 cup toasted, sliced almonds

Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
2 – Spray an 8×8 pan with non-stick cooking spray.
3 – Mix crust ingredients together in a mixing bowl. Mix well. Press into prepared pan. Bake 10-12 minutes or until firm.
4 – Mix cream cheese and Splenda Granulated Sweetener together until smooth. Add eggs, one at a time, scraping the sides of the bowl, and mixing well after each addition. Add sour cream and extracts; mix well. Pour over prepared crust.
5 – Bake in preheated oven for 40 to 47 minutes, or until firm.
6 – Top with toasted almonds.

Recipe Yield: Serves: 20 Serving Size: 1 bar

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 120
Fat: 8 grams
Saturated Fat: 3.5 grams
Sodium: 105 milligrams
Cholesterol: 35 milligrams
Protein: 4 grams
Carbohydrates: 8 grams
Sugars: 4 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/almond-cheesecake-bars

Diabetic Dish of the Week – GRAHAM-CRACKER CRUSTED COD

April 10, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is a GRAHAM-CRACKER CRUSTED COD. Cod with a Graham Cracker Crust! It’s only 230 calories and 9 carbs per serving. It’s from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website (https://diabeticgourmet.com/) At the website you’ll find a large selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes along with Diabetes Management Tips and Diabetes News. So check it out today! Well Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018!

GRAHAM-CRACKER CRUSTED COD

Ingredients

1 lb tilapia, cod, haddock or other medium-firm fish fillets, about 3/4 inch thick
1/2 cup graham cracker crumbs (about 8 squares)
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1/4 cup fat-free (skim) milk
2 tablespoons canola oil
2 tablespoons chopped toasted pecans

Directions

1 – Move oven rack to position slightly above middle of oven. Heat oven to 500F.
2 – Cut fish fillets crosswise into 2-inch-wide pieces. In shallow dish, mix cracker crumbs, lemon peel, salt and pepper. Place milk in another shallow dish.
3 – Dip fish into milk, then coat with cracker mixture. Place in ungreased 13×9-inch pan. Drizzle oil over fish; sprinkle with pecans.
4 – Bake about 10 minutes or until fish flakes easily with fork. Toasting nuts adds a lot of great flavor. To toast nuts, bake uncovered in ungreased shallow pan in 350F oven 6 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until light brown.

NOTES:
This graham cracker coated cod can be on your dinner table in just 25 minutes.

Recipe Yield: Yield: 4 servings

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 230
Fat: 12 grams
Saturated Fat: 1.5 grams
Sodium: 300 milligrams
Cholesterol: 60 milligrams
Protein: 23 grams
Carbohydrates: 9 grams
Sugars: 5 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/graham-cracker-crusted-cod

Gingersnap Pumpkin Cheesecake

November 12, 2017 at 6:05 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, dessert | Leave a comment
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I’m passing along a recipe I came across at the CooksRecipes website, Gingersnap Pumpkin Cheesecake. Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener replaces the Sugar in the recipe. Perfect Dessert for your Holiday Table. Again its at the CooksRecipes website which has a huge selection of recipes for all occasions. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

Gingersnap Pumpkin Cheesecake
This new and healthy version is a tasty twist of a classic recipe. The gingersnap crust offers the perfect balance to the creamy pumpkin filling.

Recipe Ingredients:

3/4 cup gingersnap cookie crumbs
3/4 cup crushed fat-free graham crackers
2 tablespoons Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener
1/4 cup unsalted butter, melted
3 (8-ounce) containers block-style fat-free cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup Splenda® Granulated No Calorie Sweetener
1 1/2 cups canned solid pack pumpkin
1 tablespoon molasses
1/2 cup nonfat evaporated milk
1/3 cup maple syrup
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground allspice
4 large eggs

Cooking Directions:

1 – Preheat oven to 325°F (165°C). Grease and flour an 8 inch springform pan.
2 – Using a fork, combine gingersnaps, graham crackers, 2 tablespoons Splenda® Granulated Sweetener, and melted butter. Press mixture onto the bottom and two inches up the sides of the pan to form the crust.
3 – With an electric mixer, beat cream cheese and 1/2 cup Splenda® Granulated Sweetener until light and fluffy. Stir in the pumpkin. Mix in the molasses, evaporated milk, maple syrup, cinnamon, allspice and vanilla. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, mixing until smooth.
4 – Pour batter into prepared crust.
5 – Bake in the preheated oven for 90 minutes, or until center of cheesecake is set. Allow to cool in pan for 30 minutes, then refrigerate overnight.
Makes 8 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/8 of recipe): Calories: 310; Calories from Fat: 100; Total Fat: 11g; Saturated Fat: 5g; Cholesterol: 130mg; Sodium: 550mg; Total Carbs: 34g; Dietary Fiber: 3g; Sugars: 18g; Protein: 19g.

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/gingersnap_pumpkin_cheesecake_recipe.html

One of America’s Favorites – Moon Pies

May 8, 2017 at 5:26 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Moon pie

A moon pie or MoonPie is a confection, popular in parts of the United States, which consists of two round graham cracker cookies, with marshmallow filling in the center, dipped in a flavored coating. The snack is often associated with the cuisine of the American South where they are traditionally accompanied by an RC Cola. Today, MoonPies are made by the Chattanooga Bakery in Chattanooga, TN.

The traditional pie is approximately four inches in diameter. A smaller version exists (mini MoonPie) that is approximately half the size, and a Double-Decker MoonPie of the traditional diameter features a third cookie and attendant layer of marshmallow. The four main flavors are chocolate, vanilla, strawberry, and banana. Double Decker MoonPies also come in lemon and orange; MoonPie Crunch comes only in peanut butter or mint. In 2014, a salted caramel flavor was introduced.

 
MoonPies have been made daily at the Chattanooga Bakery since the incorporation of MoonPie on April 29, 1917. Earl Mitchell Junior said his father came up with the idea for MoonPies when he asked a Kentucky coal miner what kind of snack he would like to eat, and the miner requested something with graham cracker and marshmallow. Popular folklore, repeated and encouraged by the Chattanooga Bakery itself, states the miner then asked the snack be “as big as the moon”, which inspired the name “moon pie”.

There is a custom for eating MoonPies with RC Cola, although the origin of this is unknown. It is likely that their

A double-decker Moon Pie split in half.

inexpensive prices, combined with their larger serving sizes, contributed to establishing this combination as the “working man’s lunch”. The popularity of this combination was celebrated in a popular song of the 1950s, by Big Bill Lister, “Gimmee an RC Cola and a Moon Pie”. In 1973, NRBQ had a minor hit with the song, “An RC Cola and a Moon Pie”.

Since New Year’s Eve 2008, the city of Mobile, Alabama has been raising a 12-foot-tall lighted mechanical moon pie to celebrate the coming of the new year. The giant banana colored MoonPie is raised by a crane to a height of 200 feet as the clock strikes midnight. Also, the city had for the 2008 New Year’s celebration the world’s largest MoonPie baked for the occasion. It weighed 55 pounds and contained 45,000 calories.

An annual RC & MoonPie Festival is celebrated in Bell Buckle, Tennessee, and a MoonPie Eating Contest is held in Bessemer, Alabama.

On October 16, 2010, Sonya Thomas, a competitive eater known as the “Black Widow”, ate 38 MoonPies in eight minutes in Caruthersville, Missouri.

Newport, Tennessee held its first annual MoonPie Festival in May 2012.

 
Mardi Gras tradition
The MoonPie became a traditional “throw” (an item thrown from a parade float into the crowd) of Mardi Gras “krewes” (parade participants) in Mobile, Alabama during 1956, followed by other communities along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. The westernmost outpost of the MoonPie as an important Carnival throw is Slidell, Louisiana, which has a parade by “The Krewe of Mona Lisa and MoonPie”. Also, in the town of Oneonta, Alabama, there is a MoonPie eating contest started by Wal-Mart employee John Love when he inadvertently ordered too many. This anecdote was featured in Sam Walton’s autobiography, Made in America.

 
Apollo 11 great moon walk tradition
The MoonPie is a traditional celebratory food for remembering the Apollo 11 moon walk that took place on July 20, 1969. MoonPies are used in the commemorative celebration by aerospace workers and enthusiasts across the globe.

 
A MoonPie is made with marshmallow, which is a low-fat but high-sugar food. The nutritional content of a chocolate full-size or Mini MoonPie (from 2004) is detailed below, showing (full-size) 226 calories, saturated fat 3.5g, carbohydrate 40g, protein 4g, iron 5%, of a total weight of 57 grams (2 ounces). The nutritional data for a chocolate Mini MoonPie is about 65% the amount of full-size.

The ingredients are as follows: enriched wheat flour (niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), corn syrup, sugar, vegetable shortening (contains partially hydrogenated soybean oil and/or cottonseed oil and/or coconut oil and/or palm kernel oil and/or palm oil), soy flour, dutched cocoa (processed with alkali), cocoa, kosher gelatin, baking soda, lecithin, salt, artificial flavoring, sodium sulfite.

 

 

Wagon Wheels are similar to moon pies and are found in the United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada

In the northern areas of the U.S. a similar product is called a “Scooter Pie” and there is also a single-cracker marshmallow cookie called “Mallomars”. Little Debbie also makes what they call “Marshmallow Pies” which are nearly identical to the Moonpies. In the United Kingdom, Australia and Canada a similar product is called “Wagon Wheels” and in Japan, “Choco Pie” and the smaller-sized “Angel Pies” by Morinaga.

Some South Korean and Taiwanese companies produce “Choco pies”, and in Mexico there are similar cookie pies called “Mamut” (Spanish for “Mammoth”, sold by Gamesa), and “Rocko” (marketed by Marinela); there are several other minor brands as well. In Turkey, a similar pie is called “Halley”. In Egypt, a similar pie is called “Bimbo”. In Argentina a similar treat is “Alfajor”, more than 20 brands marketed as “alfajores” are very popular.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Graham Crackers

May 23, 2016 at 5:11 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Graham cracker

Graham cracker

The graham cracker (/ˈɡræm/; also graham wafer) was invented in 1829 in Bound Brook, New Jersey, by Presbyterian minister Sylvester Graham. The original graham cracker was made with graham flour; a combination of finely-ground unbleached-wheat flour with the wheat bran and germ coarsely-ground and added back in providing flavor. While graham crackers started out as a mild food, unsweetened or mildly sweetened, they are more commonly known as a sugar- or honey-sweetened baked good that approaches a cookie.

 
The graham cracker was originally conceived of as a health food as part of the Graham Diet, a regimen to suppress what Reverend Graham considered unhealthy carnal urges, the source of many maladies according to Graham. Reverend Graham would often lecture on “self-abuse”, as masturbation was commonly called at the time. Graham would often say how these experiences were inspired by children eating crackers. One of his many theories was that one could curb one’s sexual appetite by eating bland foods. Another man who held this belief was John Harvey Kellogg, the inventor of the corn flakes cereal.

 
Most modern graham crackers are made mainly of the refined white flour to which the Rev. Graham was opposed, and others are made with blends that use white flour as a base. Graham crackers have remained popular in North America as a snack food despite, or perhaps because of, greater amounts of refined sugar (often mixed with honey) and less graham flour than the original versions, which may have been unsweetened.

Some modern, commercial graham crackers could no longer be considered a health food. In fact, some of these commercial “graham crackers” are more notable for being topped with a thick crust of cinnamon and sugar or having chocolate flavoring or coatings added. Technically, crackers are not really graham crackers unless they are made with graham flour, which is a hard (high protein) wheat flour in which the constituent bran, germ, and endosperm have been ground separately, the first two coarsely and the third finely.

Basic modern graham crackers are common in America as a snack for young children, at home or at preschool, early elementary school, and other child care facilities.
Graham crackers, along with marshmallows (roasted or unroasted) and milk chocolate bars, are used to make a simple dessert or treat that has come to be called “s’mores” (a contraction of the end of the phrase “give me some more”) in North America.

One of America’s Favorites – Crackers

April 13, 2015 at 5:29 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Water biscuit crackers

Water biscuit crackers

A cracker is a baked good typically made from a grain and flour, dough and usually manufactured in large quantities. Crackers are basically a smaller version of bread. Crackers are usually flat, crisp, small in size (usually 3 inches or less in diameter) and made in various shapes, commonly round or square. Flavorings or seasonings, such as salt, herbs, seeds, and/or cheese, may be added to the dough or sprinkled on top before baking. Crackers are often branded as a nutritious and convenient way to consume a staple food or cereal grain.

Crackers are eaten on their own or can accompany other food items, such as cheese or meat slices; dips; or soft spreads such as jam, butter, or peanut butter. Bland or mild crackers are sometimes used as a palate cleanser in food product testing or flavor testing, between samples. A precedent for the modern cracker can be found in nautical ship biscuits, military hardtack, and sacramental bread.

Ancestors of the cracker can be found in ancient flatbreads, such as lavash, pita, matzo, flatbrød, and crisp bread. Asian analogues include papadum and senbei.

 

 

Saltine Crackers

Saltine Crackers

 

The holes in crackers are called “docking” holes. The holes are placed in the dough to stop overly large air pockets from forming in the cracker while baking. Crackers come in many shapes and sizes – round, square, triangular, etc.

In American English, the name “cracker” is most often applied to flat biscuits with a savory, salty flavor, in distinction from a “cookie”, which may be similar to a “cracker” in appearance and texture, but has a sweet flavor. Crackers may be further distinguished from cookies by the manner in which they are made. Crackers are made merely by layering dough and cookies may be made in many of the same manners a cake would be prepared. Crackers sometimes have cheese or spices as ingredients, or even chicken stock. Crackers are typically salted flour products.

Brands including Bremner Wafers, Captain’s Wafers, Club Crackers, Town House crackers, Graham crackers, Ritz Crackers, Cream crackers and water biscuits are sometimes spread with cheese, pâté, or mousse.

Saltine and oyster crackers are often used in or served with soup.

Mock apple pie is made from Ritz (or similar) crackers.

Graham crackers and digestive biscuits are also eaten as cookies, although they were both invented for their supposed health benefits.

 

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