Healthy Fall Entertaining Recipes

October 17, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Fall Entertaining Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Fall Entertaining Recipes like; Slow-Cooker Sweet Potato Casserole with Marshmallows, Slow-Cooker Sausage and Apple Stuffing, and Hungarian Goulash. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Fall Entertaining Recipes
Find healthy, delicious fall entertaining recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Slow-Cooker Sweet Potato Casserole with Marshmallows
The genius hack in this recipe: topping sweet potatoes with marshmallows while they’re still piping hot from the slow cooker yields a baked marshmallow topping that’s typical with baked sweet potato casseroles…….

Slow-Cooker Sausage and Apple Stuffing
This sausage and apple stuffing is extra-moist and full of classic fall flavors. Using a slow cooker makes this side dish even easier and saves on oven space……….

Hungarian Goulash
Layer the vegetables, meat and tomato mixture in your slow cooker in the morning and let it cook it until dinner. All you’ll need to do is prepare the noodles and this beef stew will be ready to serve……………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Fall Entertaining Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19825/seasonal/fall/entertaining/

Advertisements

Healthy Beef Recipes

June 14, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Beef Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Beef Recipes like; Raspberry BBQ Sausage Bites, American Goulash, and Better-Than-Takeout Burgers with Sweet Potato Fries. Find these Recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Beef Recipes
Find healthy, delicious beef recipes including ground beef, roast beef, stews and beef brisket. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Raspberry BBQ Sausage Bites
Sweet, smoky and savory, these sausage appetizer bites are a cinch to throw together at the last minute. Just throw some smoked sausage on the grill, slice and toss with the fresh homemade raspberry barbecue sauce for the ultimate crowd-pleaser…….

American Goulash
American goulash, also known as old-fashioned goulash, is the perfect economical family meal. The pasta cooks right in the sauce, so this satisfying dish can cook in just one pot…..

Better-Than-Takeout Burgers with Sweet Potato Fries
This healthy take on burgers and fries swaps in chopped mushrooms for some of the meat in the burger patties, to cut back on calories and saturated fat…….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Beef Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18237/ingredients/meat-poultry/beef/

Healthy Fall Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes

October 16, 2016 at 5:05 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From the EatingWell website its Healthy Fall Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes. Delicious and healthy recipes including; Overnight Oatmeal, Slow-Cooker Black Bean-Mushroom Chili, Hungarian Beef Goulash. You can find them all at EatingWell website. http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Healthy Fall Crockpot and Slow Cooker RecipesEatingWell2
Find healthy, delicious fall crockpot and slow-cooker recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

 

 

Overnight Oatmeal
Here is an easy way to serve a crowd a hearty breakfast before facing the elements for a day of winter sports. You can assemble it in the slow cooker in the evening and wake up to a bowl of hot, nourishing oatmeal. The slow cooker eliminates the need for constant stirring and ensures an exceptionally creamy consistency. It is important to use steel-cut oats; old-fashioned oats become too soft during slow-cooking…..

 
Slow-Cooker Black Bean-Mushroom Chili
Black beans, earthy mushrooms and tangy tomatillos combine with a variety of spices and smoky chipotles to create a fantastic full-flavored chili. It can simmer in the slow cooker all day, which makes it perfect for a healthy supper when the end of your day is rushed……

 
Hungarian Beef Goulash
This streamlined goulash skips the step of browning the beef, and instead coats it in a spice crust to give it a rich mahogany hue. This saucy dish is a natural served over whole-wheat egg noodles. Or, for something different, try prepared potato gnocchi or spaetzle……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Fall Crockpot and Slow Cooker Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19823/seasonal/fall/crockpot-

One of America’s Favorites – Goulash

November 10, 2014 at 6:27 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,
Gulyás in a traditional "bogrács"

Gulyás in a traditional “bogrács”

Goulash (Hungarian: gulyás) is a soup or stew of meat and vegetables, seasoned with paprika and other spices. Originating from the medieval Kingdom of Hungary, goulash is also a popular meal in Central Europe, Scandinavia and Southern Europe.

Its origin traces back to the 9th century. The cooked and flavored meat was dried with the help of the sun and packed into bags produced from sheep’s stomachs, needing only water to make it into a meal. It is one of the national dishes of Hungary and a symbol of the country.

 

 

 

 

The name originates from the Hungarian “gulyás” [ˈɡujaːʃ] ( listen). The word “gulya” means “herd of cattle” in Hungarian, and “gulyás” means “herdsman”.

The word gulyás originally meant only “herdsman”, but over time the dish became gulyáshús (goulash meat) – that is to say, a meat dish which was prepared by herdsmen. Today, gulyás refers both to the herdsmen, and to the soup. From the Middle Ages until well into the 19th century, the Puszta was the home of massive herds of cattle. They were driven, in their tens of thousands, to Europe’s biggest cattle markets in Moravia, Vienna, Nuremberg and Venice. The herdsmen made sure that there were always some cattle that had to be slaughtered along the way, the flesh of which provided them with gulyáshús.

In Hungarian cuisine, traditional “Gulyásleves” (literally “goulash soup”), “bográcsgulyás”, pörkölt, and paprikás were thick stews made by cattle herders and stockmen. Garlic, tomato, caraway seed, bell pepper, and wine are optional. One may alternatively prepare these dishes as soups rather than stews. Excepting paprikás, the Hungarian stews do not rely on a flour or roux for thickening.

Goulash can be prepared from beef, veal, pork, or lamb. Typical cuts include the shank, shin, or shoulder; as a result, goulash derives its thickness from tough, well-exercised muscles rich in collagen, which is converted to gelatin during the cooking process. Meat is cut into chunks, seasoned with salt, and then browned with sliced onion in a pot with oil or lard. Paprika is added, along with water or stock, and the goulash is left to simmer. After cooking a while, garlic, whole or ground caraway seed, or soup vegetables like carrot, parsley root, peppers (green or bell pepper), celery and a small tomato may be added. Other herbs and spices could also be added, especially chili pepper, bay leaf and thyme. Diced potatoes may be added, since they provide starch as they cook, which makes the goulash thicker and smoother. A small amount of white wine or wine vinegar may also be added near the end of cooking to round the taste. Goulash may be served with small egg noodles called csipetke. The name Csipetke comes from pinching small, fingernail-sized bits out of the dough (csipet =pinch) before adding them to the boiling soup.

 

 

 

Hungarian Gulyásleves, Goulash soup

Hungarian Gulyásleves, Goulash soup

Hungarian goulash variations

* Gulyás à la Székely. Reduce the potatoes and add sauerkraut and sour cream.
* Gulyás Hungarian Plain Style. Omit the homemade soup pasta (csipetke) and add vegetables.
* Mock Gulyás. Substitute beef bones for the meat and add vegetables. Also called Hamisgulyás, (Fake Goulash)
* Bean Gulyás. Omit the potatoes and the caraway seeds. Use kidney beans instead.
* Csángó Gulyás. Add sauerkraut instead of pasta and potatoes.
* Betyár Gulyás. Use smoked beef or smoked pork for meat.
* Likócsi Pork Gulyás. Use pork and thin vermicelli in the goulash instead of potato and soup pasta. Flavor with lemon juice.
* Mutton Gulyás or Birkagulyás. Made with mutton. Add red wine for flavour.
A thicker and richer goulash, similar to a stew, originally made with three kinds of meat, is called Székely gulyás, named after the Hungarian writer, journalist and archivist József Székely (1825–1895).

Paprikás krumpli
“Paprikás krumpli” is a traditional paprika-based potato stew with diced potatoes, onion, tomato, bell peppers, ground paprika and some bacon or sliced spicy sausage, like the smoked Debrecener, in lieu of beef.

In German-speaking countries this inexpensive peasant stew is made with sausage and known as Kartoffelgulasch (“potato goulash”)

 

 

Venison goulash with apples, berries and potato croquettes

Venison goulash with apples, berries and potato croquettes

 

Thick stews similar to pörkölt and the original cattlemen stew are popular throughout almost all the former Austrian-Hungarian Empire, from Northeast Italy to the Carpathians. Like pörkölt, these stews are generally served with boiled or mashed potato, polenta, dumplings (e.g. nokedli, or galuska), spätzle or, alternatively, as a stand-alone dish with bread.
American goulash, mentioned in cookbooks since at least 1914, exists in a number of variant recipes. Originally a dish of seasoned beef, core ingredients of American goulash now usually include elbow macaroni, cubed steak, ground beef or hamburger, and tomatoes in some form, whether canned whole, as tomato sauce, tomato soup, and/or tomato paste.

 

Top 50 Recipes for Fall

October 10, 2013 at 1:03 PM | Posted in Eating Well | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,

50 healthy Fall recipes from the Eating Well web site!Eating Well

 

Try one of our top 50 fall recipes to celebrate the best flavors of the season.

When the weather turns cooler, creamy casseroles, baked chicken dishes and warm apple desserts hit the spot. Our top 50 recipes for fall, including lighter comfort foods recipes, hearty stew recipes, apple pie recipes and more healthy fall recipes are delicious meals featuring in-season fruits and vegetables as well as lean protein. Try our Chicken Breasts with Mushroom Cream Sauce for a lighter creamy chicken recipe or Baked Mac & Cheese for a crowd-pleasing, kid-friendly fall casserole recipe. Enjoy our top 50 recipes for fall throughout the season!

 
Hungarian Beef Goulash
This streamlined goulash skips the step of browning the beef, and instead coats it in a spice crust to give it a rich mahogany hue. This saucy dish is a natural served over whole-wheat egg noodles. Or, for something different, try prepared potato gnocchi or spaetzle…..

 

 

Chicken Breasts with Mushroom Cream Sauce
The secret to a good cream sauce is always the same: not too much cream or it can be overpowering, masking the more delicate flavors. Here it contains a bountiful amount of mushrooms and is served over chicken breasts…….

 

 

* Click the the link below to get all 50 recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/top_50_recipes_for_fall#leaderboardad

One of America’s Favorites – Stew

November 5, 2012 at 10:45 AM | Posted in BEEF, carrots, chicken, cooking, Food, potatoes, vegetables | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A stew is a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy. Ingredients in a

A beef stew

stew can include any combination of vegetables (such as carrots, potatoes, beans, peppers and tomatoes, etc.), meat, especially tougher meats suitable for slow-cooking, such as beef. Poultry, sausages, and seafood are also used. While water can be used as the stew-cooking liquid, wine, stock, and beer are also common. Seasoning and flavorings may also be added. Stews are typically cooked at a relatively low temperature (simmered, not boiled), allowing flavors to mingle.
Stewing is suitable for the least tender cuts of meat that become tender and juicy with the slow moist heat method. This makes it popular in low-cost cooking. Cuts having a certain amount of marbling and gelatinous connective tissue give moist, juicy stews, while lean meat may easily become dry.
Stews may be thickened by reduction or with flour, either by coating pieces of meat with flour before searing, or by using a roux or beurre manié, a dough consisting of equal parts of butter and flour. Thickeners like cornstarch or arrowroot may also be used.
Stews are similar to soups, and in some cases there may not be a clear distinction between the two. Generally, stews have less liquid than soups, are much thicker and require longer cooking over low heat. While soups are almost always served in a bowl, stews may be thick enough to be served on a plate with the gravy as a sauce over the solid ingredients.

 

Stews have been made since ancient times. Herodotus says that the Scythians (8th to 4th centuries BC) “put the flesh into an animal’s

Lamb and Lentil Stew

paunch, mix water with it, and boil it like that over the bone fire. The bones burn very well, and the paunch easily contains all the meat once it has been stripped off. In this way an ox, or any other sacrificial beast, is ingeniously made to boil itself.”
Amazonian tribes used the shells of turtles as vessels, boiling the entrails of the turtle and various other ingredients in them. Other cultures used the shells of large mollusks (clams etc.) to boil foods in.[citation needed] There is archaeological evidence of these practices going back 8,000 years or more.
There are recipes for lamb stews and fish stews in the Roman cookery book Apicius, believed to date from the 4th century AD. Le Viandier, one of the oldest cookbooks in French, written by the French chef known as Taillevent, has ragouts or stews of various types in it.
Hungarian Goulash dates back to the 9th century Magyar shepherds of the area, before the existence of Hungary. Paprika was added in the 18th century.
The first written reference to ‘Irish stew‘ is in Byron’s “The Devil’s Drive” (1814): “The Devil … dined on … a rebel or so in an Irish stew.

 

In meat-based stews, white stews, also known as blanquettes or fricassées, are made with lamb or veal that is blanched, or lightly seared without browning, and cooked in stock. Brown stews are made with pieces of red meat that are first seared or browned, before a browned mirepoix, sometimes browned flour, stock and wine are added. These choices of stew are all unique to the individuals’ personal stew preference.

 

Examples of Stews:

 

*Baeckeoffe, a potato stew from Alsace;
*Barbacoa, a meat stew from Mexico;
*Beef Stroganoff, a stew with beef from Russia
*Bigos, a traditional stew in Polish cuisine;
*Birria, a goat stew from Mexico;
*Chicken stew, whole chicken and seasonings;
*Chicken paprikash, chicken stew with paprika;
*Chili con carne, Mexican meat and bean stew;
*Chili sin carne, a meatless American adaptation of the Mexican dish;
*Chilorio, a pork stew from Sinaloa, Mexico;

Goulash in a traditional “bogrács”

*Goulash, a Hungarian meat stew with paprika;
*Gumbo, a Louisiana creole dish;
*Hachee, a Dutch type of stew with wine or vinegar.
*Haleem, a Pakistani lentil and beef stew;
*Hasenpfeffer, a sour, marinated rabbit stew from Germany;
*Hayashi rice, a Japanese dish of beef, onions and mushrooms in red wine and demi-glace sauce, served with rice;
*Irish stew, made with lamb or mutton, potato, onion and parsley
*Pichelsteiner a traditional German stew
*Pörkölt, a Hungarian meat stew resembling goulash, flavored with paprika;
*Potjiekos, a South African stew;
*Pot au feu, a simple French stew;

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Blessings by Me

Just a bit of my life

COOKING WITH LUCE

DISCOVERING MY INNER CHEF

Cooking with Brad

A Cooking Experience

Rock in the Kitchen

Each week I try to not be the worst cook in America

Lithuanian in the USA

Lithuanian girl's recipes and life in the USA

Articuleat

Recipes & Ramblings from Chef Patron Sebby Holmes (Owner of Award Winning Thai Restaurant, Farang London & Author of Cook Thai). A place where food and writing meet. Careful! It's a mouthful

A Vintage Kitchen

classic comfort food with a modern twist

Learn Fun Facts

An Archive of Curious Facts for the Curious

angelalimaq

food, travel and musings of a TV presenter

Hankerings

From cheeseburgers to foie gras — eat what you hanker for.

Cooking Conveniently and with Purpose #LPBcooks

Relax. They never know what you actually planned to serve them...

The Wacky Spoon

- Taking you from Garden-to-Table -

Stef's Eats and Sweets

Dinner & Desserts......Made with Love

krumkaker

Cooking, baking and living in Accra: what's not to like?

Sierramichaels's Blog

Author, writer, archaeologist and traveler

Popsicle Society

It's all about you

Browsing The Atlas

Exploring one dot on the map at a time

Wellness done write

musings by melissa abbruzzese