Happy National Chili Dog Day!

July 30, 2015 at 3:55 PM | Posted in cheese, chili | Leave a comment
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Today (Thu 30th Jul, 2015) is…
Chili Dog Daycheese coneys 001

 

 

A day to celebrate one of America’s favorite foods, Chili Dog Day is dedicated to the humble chili hot dog.

 

 

Today is National Chili Dog Day! July is also National Hot Dog Month! According to the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council, Americans are expected to eat 7 billion hot dogs from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

GOLD STAR CHILI COOK-OFF

January 23, 2015 at 6:30 AM | Posted in chili, Festivals | Leave a comment
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GOLD STAR CHILI COOK-OFF
WHEN – 25 January, 2015 11:00 AM – 3:00 PMGold Star Chili Cook off

Every January we heat up the market with the hottest chili cook-off in town! 2015 marks the 11th year the market has hosted local chili enthusiasts competing for our coveted Chili Meister crown. And we’re proud to have Gold Star Chili back as our Event Sponsor!

Cook-off is limited to first 25 contestants. First place: $100; second place: $50; and third place; $25. The winner automatically qualifies to compete in the All-Ohio Regional Chili Cook-Off held in September 2014. Each winner will also receive a gift basket loaded with Gold Star Chili goodies.

Limit 25 contestants!

A Little History of: Cincinnati Chili

March 5, 2013 at 5:46 PM | Posted in chili, Hot Dogs, Skyline Chili, spaghetti | 2 Comments
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Cincinnati chili (or “Cincinnati-style chili”) is a regional style of chili con carne characterized by the use of seasonings such as

A Cincinnati chili 4-way with oyster crackers

A Cincinnati chili 4-way with oyster crackers

cinnamon, cloves, allspice or chocolate. It is commonly served over spaghetti or as a hot dog sauce, and is normally of a thin, sauce-like consistency, unlike most chili con carne. While served in many regular restaurants, it is most often associated with several restaurant chains, such as Empress Chili, Skyline Chili, Gold Star Chili, Camp Washington Chili and Dixie Chili. Restaurant locations are found pervasively in greater Cincinnati with franchise locations also throughout Ohio and in Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida. Restaurants that feature Cincinnati chili are frequently called “chili parlors”.
According to the Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau, Cincinnatians consume more than two million pounds of chili each year, topped by 850,000 pounds of shredded cheddar cheese. Each September, the city celebrates “Chilifest” at Yeatman’s Cove on the Ohio River, with food and entertainment.

 

Ordering Cincinnati chili is based on this ingredient series: chili, spaghetti, grated cheddar cheese, diced onions, and kidney beans. The number before the “way” of the chili determines which ingredients are included in each chili order. Thus, customers can order a:

 

Bowl: chili in a bowl
Two-way: chili and spaghetti
Three-way: chili, spaghetti, and cheese
Four-way: chili, spaghetti, cheese, and onions
Five-way: chili, spaghetti, cheese, onions, and beans
and optionally, the:
Four-way bean: chili, spaghetti, cheese, and beans (beans substituted for the onions)
The preceding basic menu is entirely traditional. Some chili parlors have altered the traditional menu method, declaring on their menus that a Four-way is chili, spaghetti, cheese, and either onions or beans. Other parlors have added ingredients to the traditional mix. For example, Dixie Chili offers a “Six-way” with the addition of garlic. Oyster crackers are usually served with Cincinnati chili, and a mild hot sauce is frequently used as an optional topping.
When served on a Coney style hot dog, dubbed the “Cheese Coney“, the chili is also topped with grated cheddar cheese. The default coney also includes mustard and a small amount of onion.

 

Cincinnati chili seems to have originated with one or more immigrant restaurateurs from Macedonia who were trying to broaden their customer base by moving beyond narrowly ethnic styles of cuisine. Tom and John Kiradjieff began serving the chili in 1922 at their hot dog stand, next to a burlesque theater called the Empress, after which their Empress chili parlor took its name. Tom Kiradjieff invented the style by modifying a traditional stew and serving it over hot dogs and spaghetti. The style has since been copied and modified by many other restaurant proprietors.
Empress was the main chili parlor in Cincinnati until 1949, when a former Empress employee and Greek immigrant, Nicholas Lambrinides, started another chili restaurant called Skyline Chili. Gold Star Chili came along in 1965, started by the four Daoud brothers who were originally from Jordan.

Gold Star Chili Cook-Off at Findlay Market Sunday January 15, 2012 Noon – 2:30pm

January 13, 2013 at 9:09 AM | Posted in chili, cooking | Leave a comment
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Calling all Chili enthusiasts – mark your calendars for Sunday, January 13, 2013. Get ready to compete for the Chili Meister title in the FindlayChili-Cookoff9th Annual Gold Star Chili Cook-Off at Findlay Market.
Thanks to our Presenting Sponsor of the event, Christian Moerlein Breweing Company. TheOTR Biergarten will be open during the competition to sell you a bottle of delicious Christian Moerlien brew, with all proceeds benefitting the OTR Brewery District!
We are happy to announce that Gold Star Chili, the Flavor of Cincinnati, will once again, be the Event Sponsor! Gold Star is Cincinnati’s hometown chili. They are, like Findlay Market, pure Cincinnati, and proud of it. They are pleased to support our competition for the best homemade chili in town! Click here for more information about Gold Star Chili.
Thanks to the Fire Museum of Greater Cincinnati, who also returns as a sponsor and is providing some great gifts to our winner!
Our team of judges will be firefighters from OTR Engine Co. 5! Thank you for your service!
This year, we are excited to announce the featured band for the event, Chuck Brisbin & The Tuna Project! This dynamic band is a Markete favorite and brings a high energy concert each time they perform for our shoppers! Click here to learn more about their talented band members and their signature sound music!
The Annual Chili Cook-Off is an eagerly awaited event for amateur chili enthusiasts. Register NOW to compete for coveted titles and prizes awarded each year for Findlay Market’s best chili!
You know you make the best chili in town so this year, get in the contest to win:

1st Prize: Chili Meister $100 Findlay Market Gift Certificates one year membership to the CincinnatiFire Museum
$150.00 value
2nd Prize: Chili Monarch $50 Findlay Market Gift Certificates
3rd Prize: Master Chiliologist $50 Findlay Market Gift Certificates

Fire Museum will also award the 1st Prize winner one time use of the Museum Conference Room for private party for two hours and if the winner is a member of the International Chili Sociaety, they will receive free entry fee (435.00 value) to the Traditional REd Category in the All Ohio Regional Chili Cook-Off 9-7-13.
In addition, all three winners will receive gift baskets of Gold Star Chili products.

The event will take place inside a heated tent along West Elder Street. Register any time after 11:00am in the tent, get those crock pots and your garnishes ready because the competition begins at noon.
The public is invited to stop by after the competition is over, from 1:30pm – 3:00pm to sample chili, buy a beer from the OTR Biergarten and listen to Chuck Brisbin & The Tuna Project!
See, January IS HOT at Findlay Market!

 

 

Who will be the next Chili Meister?http://www.findlaymarket.org/

Ohio foods make great holiday gifts

December 12, 2012 at 9:39 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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Ohio foods make great holiday gifts

 

By Alexis Larsen

 

Several destination markets in the Miami Valley and southwestern Ohio say their unique selection of Ohio-based food products are the specialized gifts shoppers are looking for this season.

Both Jungle Jim’s locations, in Fairfield and the new one at Eastgate, and Dorothy Lane Market locations just south of Dayton and in Springboro have large selections of hometown foods that can be purchased individually or as gift baskets, both in stores and online.

Jim Beckett, specialty foods manager at Jungle Jim’s who has been with the company for five years says Ohio-based food products are popular year-round, but especially during the holidays.

Tom Winter, vice president of marketing for Dorothy Lane Market, agrees. He has been with the company 45 years.

“Once you’ve grown up with these items, you miss them. It’s a craving,” Winter said. “Sons and daughters will mail baskets to parents who no longer live in Ohio and miss their favorite foods.”

There are three Ohio gift baskets that can be ordered from the Dorothy Lane website (www.shopdlm.com) ranging from $55 to $105.

Jungle Jim’s has a Cincinnati Favorite gift basket that’s available for purchase online (www.junglejims.com) for $49.99.

Here are 10 food items made in Ohio that are included in some of the stores’ food baskets or that Beckett and Winter say are popular this time of year.

1. Chocolate

There are several Ohio companies that specialize in chocolate in Ohio, but none are as celebrated as Dayton’s Esther Price (www.estherprice.com). The company produces around one million boxes of candy a year, so finding one of those trademark gold boxes for a gift won’t be too difficult. A tin of four DLM famous Killer Brownie brownies would also please the chocolate lover in your life. Each rich, gooey brownie is made from scratch and weighs in at nearly 1/3 of a pound.

2. Chips

Ohio has the second highest number of potato chip manufacturers in the country, right behind Pennsylvania. And folks in Ohio are partial to the chips they grew up with — Shearer’s (Cleveland and Akron), Ballreich’s (Toledo), Conn’s (central Ohio), Jones’ (north central Ohio), Mikesell’s (Dayton) and Grippo’s (Cincinnati). If you’re looking to go one step beyond this salty snack, then Esther Price has partnered with Mikesell’s to create a chocolate-covered potato chip box that makes for a tasty, memorable gift.

3. Nuts

For another salty snack that’s sure to impress, the gift tins from Tipp City’s Trophy Nut (www.trophynut.com) are a good place to start. Winter also recommends Jump’s Almonized Peanuts, which are included in the Ohio-themed Dorothy Lane gift baskets.

4. Sauce

Both Beckett and Winter say that Montgomery Inn barbecue sauce is a popular Ohio gift basket item (www.montgomeryinn.com). Beckett included La Rosa’s Pasta Sauces on his list, while Winter had Mamma DiSalvo’s Sauce as a suggestion (www.larosas.com, www.mammadisalvo.com). Urbana’s Robert Rothchild Farm also has a number of sauces and spreads that make good gifts (www.robertrothschild.com)

5. Salad dressing

For those looking to create a full gift basket, including some Ohio-made salad dressing may be worth while. Garlic Expressions salad dressing out of Perrysburg (www.garlic-expressions.com) or a jar of Dayton’s famous Pine Club House Dressing (thepineclub.com) may be just the thing.

6. Chili

Ohioans love their chili. In Cincinnati alone, the Convention and Visitors Bureau estimates that residents consume more than two million pounds of chili each year, topped by 850,000 pounds of shredded cheddar cheese (www.cincyusa.com/chili). Skyline Chili and Gold Star Chili are probably the two most recognized names, but chili parlors like Camp Washington Chili and Dixie Chili are sprinkled all over the state — especially concentrated in southwestern Ohio. Cans of Skyline Chili are sold in most stores and can be ordered on its website (skylinechili.com) and shipped anywhere. Or if your loved one is in town, then a gift certificate works.

7. Ice cream

Since 1870 Graeter’s has been the ice cream of choice in Cincinnati (www.graeters.com). Seasonal flavors cinnamon, peppermint and egg nog are all available for purchase in Graeter’s locations or on their website to ship as well as all of their signiture flavors they have become famous for. Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams, a newer company out of Columbus, also makes for a unique gift item with seasonal flavors such as Pumpkin 5 -Spice, Boozy Egg Nog, Cranberry Royale Sorbet and Sweet Potato with Torched Marshmallows (www.jenis.com).

8. Alcohol

There are plenty of Ohio-made wines with more than 150 licensed wineries in the state (www.tasteohiowines.com). There are also many Ohio breweries making great beers — too many to list — that you could purchase a gift from. Two ideas among many include giving a bottle of Buckeye Vodka (www.buckeyevodka.com) or a six-pack of the ever-popular Christmas Ale from Great Lakes Brewing Co., which is spiced with honey, cinnamon and fresh ginger.

9. Coffee

Local coffee houses are a good spot to purchase unusual flavors of coffee beans. Dayton’s Boston Stoker, for example, sells many different kinds of coffee blends online (www.bostonstoker.com/store) and in stores. It makes for a good addition to a gift basket going to a caffeine lover.

10. Egg nog

This wasn’t on the list from either Beckett or Winter, but an Ohio egg nog is a conversation starter. Hartzler Family Dairy in Wooster makes an egg nog like you’ve probably never had. It’s the real deal, and a bottle of that paired with a bottle of bourbon makes for an unforgettable gift for the man in your life that’s hard to buy for.

 

 

http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/lifestyles/ohio-foods-make-great-holiday-gifts/nTRwQ/

 

The Cincinnati Pumpkin Pie Wars Have Started!

November 10, 2012 at 9:59 AM | Posted in baking, dessert, Food | Leave a comment
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In Your Face: In Cincinnati, a Pie War Heats Up
Rivalry Among Pumpkin Purveyors Spiced With Pranks; Dueling Billboards
By CAROLINE PORTER

CINCINNATI—Dan and Brian Busken, of the family-owned Busken Bakery, pulled into the parking lot of a Frisch’s Big Boy on a recent morning for a clandestine mission: They donned ski masks with fake mustaches attached, placed a ladder next to the restaurant’s namesake statue and cloaked Big Boy in a Busken apron.

To top things off, they encased the statue’s trademark burger in a Busken pie box. They then posted the maneuver on YouTube and Facebook in a video complete with fake explosions and flashes of lightning.

“I know it’s not typical behavior of a CEO and a vice president,” says Dan Busken, 37-year-old prankster-in-chief of the 84-year-old family business known for cheeky ad campaigns, such as a billboard telling motorists to “Have a Crumby Day” with a picture of a smiley-face cookie.

The late October makeover was a recent volley in a pumpkin pie war between the small bakery chain and the regional restaurant group. What began as a friendly rivalry has been whipped up into an escalating tit for tat, playing out in billboards, social media stunts and live-action high jinks.

Rivalries have long generated marketing battles between corporate giants. In Cincinnati, a city of about 300,000 overlooking the Ohio River, one-upmanship has its own flavor.

The town’s rival chili chains, Gold Star Chili Inc. and Skyline Chili Inc., have traded barbs over who serves the best “3-Way”—a chili served over spaghetti, with cheddar cheese on top. The chains, sometimes the subjects of consumer taste-offs, enlist endorsements from college and professional sports teams. And locals hotly debate the merits of Graeter’s ice cream versus Aglamesis Bro’s—both century-old, family-run businesses known for their signature versions of black raspberry chocolate chip.

The pie wars began in the fall of 2010 when Frisch’s Restaurants Inc., a chain with 95 restaurants and 25 franchisees known for its double-decker Big Boy burger, launched a new billboard campaign for its pumpkin pies. One sign, with the slogan, “Hello, Pumpkin,” was inadvertently located directly over Busken’s flagship store.

Busken Bakery Inc., a 10-store chain where patrons take a ticket as they wait to order cookies, coffee and doughnuts, quickly launched its own pie in Frisch’s face. It bought an adjacent billboard that read, “That’s ‘Mr. Pumpkin’ to you, Big Boy.”

“I didn’t plan it that way,” says Karen Maier, vice president of marketing for the restaurant chain, which meets in the summer with its advertising folks to hash out the holiday master plan. “But I promise you, after the first year I ordered the board for the next year.”

In 2011, the two chains traded jabs on billboards, like boxers circling each other in a ring. Frisch’s initial sign over the bakery’s flagship store was a simple picture of a pumpkin pie with the words: “You had me at hello.”

The Busken brothers, who typically brainstorm their retorts over coffee in offices smelling of baked bread and doughnuts at the company factory, shot back: “Sorry Big Boy, this pumpkin’s taken.”

The dialogue continued on Facebook.

“Oh, sorry for being so fresh,” came the response from the restaurant chain.

Busken: “Let’s just be friends.”

Frisch’s: “Sure, nothing hurts my fillings.”

Dan Busken, who says he once arranged for his high-school classmates to park their cars in a big circle to deny access to spots for the faculty on the first day of his senior year, admits he can’t really taste a difference in the two chains’ fillings. But he claims superiority in crust. “It is all made from scratch,” he said. “I would guess their crust is manufactured and brought in.”

Ms. Maier says Frisch’s makes its crust in-house, along with a filling that comes from specially aged Indiana pumpkins and a handful of secret spices. The pies are baked in a ferris-wheel style oven at the company’s factory.

“It is like your mom’s potato salad versus my mom’s potato salad,” said Ms. Maier, a Cincinnati native. “Both are good, but it just depends on what you grew up with.”

Both companies have clearly benefited from the spat. Frisch’s, which typically sells 90,000 pumpkin pies during its 16-week selling window, saw a 5% uptick the first year. The bakery, with an average of 2,500 pumpkin pies during the Thanksgiving season, saw a 20% jump in sales.

By CAROLINE PORTER

CINCINNATI—Dan and Brian Busken, of the family-owned Busken Bakery, pulled into the parking lot of a Frisch’s Big Boy on a recent morning for a clandestine mission: They donned ski masks with fake mustaches attached, placed a ladder next to the restaurant’s namesake statue and cloaked Big Boy in a Busken apron.
Two restaurants in Cincinnati, Ohio have taken their battle over which restaurant makes the city’s best pumpkin pie to the prank stage. WSJ’s Caroline Porter reports on the Cincinnati “pie wars”.

To top things off, they encased the statue’s trademark burger in a Busken pie box. They then posted the maneuver on YouTube and Facebook in a video complete with fake explosions and flashes of lightning.

“I know it’s not typical behavior of a CEO and a vice president,” says Dan Busken, 37-year-old prankster-in-chief of the 84-year-old family business known for cheeky ad campaigns, such as a billboard telling motorists to “Have a Crumby Day” with a picture of a smiley-face cookie.

The late October makeover was a recent volley in a pumpkin pie war between the small bakery chain and the regional restaurant group. What began as a friendly rivalry has been whipped up into an escalating tit for tat, playing out in billboards, social media stunts and live-action high jinks.

Rivalries have long generated marketing battles between corporate giants. In Cincinnati, a city of about 300,000 overlooking the Ohio River, one-upmanship has its own flavor.
Caroline Porter/The Wall Street Journal
Karen Maier, marketing executive at Frisch’s, pictured, and Dan Busken, CEO of Busken Bakery, are waging a cheeky battle in ads for their companies’ pies.
Caroline Porter/The Wall Street Journal
Dan Busken is the 37-year-old prankster-in-chief of a family business known for cheeky ad campaigns.

The town’s rival chili chains, Gold Star Chili Inc. and Skyline Chili Inc., have traded barbs over who serves the best “3-Way”—a chili served over spaghetti, with cheddar cheese on top. The chains, sometimes the subjects of consumer taste-offs, enlist endorsements from college and professional sports teams. And locals hotly debate the merits of Graeter’s ice cream versus Aglamesis Bro’s—both century-old, family-run businesses known for their signature versions of black raspberry chocolate chip.

The pie wars began in the fall of 2010 when Frisch’s Restaurants Inc., a chain with 95 restaurants and 25 franchisees known for its double-decker Big Boy burger, launched a new billboard campaign for its pumpkin pies. One sign, with the slogan, “Hello, Pumpkin,” was inadvertently located directly over Busken’s flagship store.

Busken Bakery Inc., a 10-store chain where patrons take a ticket as they wait to order cookies, coffee and doughnuts, quickly launched its own pie in Frisch’s face. It bought an adjacent billboard that read, “That’s ‘Mr. Pumpkin’ to you, Big Boy.”
Close

Busken’s pumpkin pie

“I didn’t plan it that way,” says Karen Maier, vice president of marketing for the restaurant chain, which meets in the summer with its advertising folks to hash out the holiday master plan. “But I promise you, after the first year I ordered the board for the next year.”

In 2011, the two chains traded jabs on billboards, like boxers circling each other in a ring. Frisch’s initial sign over the bakery’s flagship store was a simple picture of a pumpkin pie with the words: “You had me at hello.”

The Busken brothers, who typically brainstorm their retorts over coffee in offices smelling of baked bread and doughnuts at the company factory, shot back: “Sorry Big Boy, this pumpkin’s taken.”

The dialogue continued on Facebook.

“Oh, sorry for being so fresh,” came the response from the restaurant chain.

Busken: “Let’s just be friends.”

Frisch’s: “Sure, nothing hurts my fillings.”

Dan Busken, who says he once arranged for his high-school classmates to park their cars in a big circle to deny access to spots for the faculty on the first day of his senior year, admits he can’t really taste a difference in the two chains’ fillings. But he claims superiority in crust. “It is all made from scratch,” he said. “I would guess their crust is manufactured and brought in.”

Ms. Maier says Frisch’s makes its crust in-house, along with a filling that comes from specially aged Indiana pumpkins and a handful of secret spices. The pies are baked in a ferris-wheel style oven at the company’s factory.

“It is like your mom’s potato salad versus my mom’s potato salad,” said Ms. Maier, a Cincinnati native. “Both are good, but it just depends on what you grew up with.”

Both companies have clearly benefited from the spat. Frisch’s, which typically sells 90,000 pumpkin pies during its 16-week selling window, saw a 5% uptick the first year. The bakery, with an average of 2,500 pumpkin pies during the Thanksgiving season, saw a 20% jump in sales.

The two chains have carved out a loyal following. At Frisch’s one recent day, Larry Daniels, who owns a family auto repair shop, said he and his wife bought a whole pie the first day they were available. “I would say that once I want one, it’s kind of a desperate thing,” says the 69-year-old.

Over at Busken’s, Ingrid Smith, 64, mused on the scalloped crust of the bakery’s pie. “It is flaky like mine,” said the retired federal employee. “Plus, Busken’s spices are little more pronounced.”

Tom Hogan, a local builder, has his own solution. “I buy Frisch’s by the slice for the fall season, and I buy Busken’s by the pie for Thanksgiving,” he said. “Does that make sense?”

This year, the wars heated up early when the Frisch’s team decided to rebrand a Busken wall sign advertising low-calorie Halloween cookies featuring an image of a vampire cookie and the slogan: “Count Calories.” A crew from the restaurant covered over the vampire cookie with vinyl stickers of a Big Boy face, and changed the slogan to say “Count Pies.”

“What happened this year is Frisch’s took it up a notch,” Mr. Busken says. “So that really just opened up a window for Brian and I to take it to the next level.”

The Busken brothers retreated to their offices in the bakery factory and came up with the idea of giving Big Boy a new outfit and posting the video. (Watch the video.)

Frisch’s was quick to respond. A new billboard went up over the Busken factory last week, reading, “Hard-to-be-humble pie.” A pumpkin-pie face, with whipped cream for eyes and a mouth, smiles down on the street.

“I’m not sure what’s going to happen with that,” said Mr. Busken, standing on the sidewalk and looking up at the new billboard, “but my mind is already spinning.”

“Bring it on, Busken boys,” says Ms. Maier.

A version of this article appeared November 8, 2012, on page A1 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: In Your Face: In Cincinnati, A Pie War Heats Up.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204755404578103063964509222.html?mod=WSJ_hp_EditorsPicks

Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers

August 6, 2012 at 5:09 PM | Posted in Kraft Cheese, Skyline Chili, spaghetti, spices and herbs | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu; Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers
The day consisted of cleaning the outdoor shed and then moving inside to clean and organize 2 closets. I really didn’t want to have to put much effort into preparing dinner so I went the very easy route of the Microwave! I went with the Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers! They now sell it packaged for the microwave, a bit smaller size than what you get at a Skyline but just right for those still watching calories and carbs. It comes with Spaghetti topped with that wonderful Skyline Chili. You add the Cheese to make it a 3 Way. I grated a block of Kraft 2% Sharp Cheese for a topping for my Chili and also had a half serving of Skyline Oyster Crackers. Overall it was just over 400 calories and 33 carbs. I left a little history of my favorite Chili Spaghetti/Coney place here in the Cincinnati area at the end of the post. For dessert later a slice of Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread topped with a scoop of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream.

 

 

Skyline Chili

Skyline Chili is a chain of chili restaurants based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Founded in 1949 by Greek immigrant Nicholas Lambrinides, Skyline Chili is named for the view of Cincinnati’s skyline that Lambrinides could see from his first restaurant (which has since been demolished), opened in the section of town now known as Price Hill. It is also the “official chili” of many local professional sports teams and venues, including the Cincinnati Reds, Columbus Blue Jackets and the Kings Island theme park, and also sponsors the Crosstown Shootout, an annual men’s college basketball rivalry game between the city’s two NCAA Division I teams, Cincinnati and Xavier.

In 1912, Nicholas Lambrinides immigrated to Cincinnati from Kastoria, Greece, and brought his favorite family recipes with him. To save up the money to bring his wife to America as well, he first worked as a cook for a railroad crew and in a hotel kitchen, then opened a short-order diner. After nearly a decade, his wife was able to join him in Cincinnati and they raised five sons.

By World War II, Lambrinides was working as a chef for the original Empress Chili restaurant, where he continued to tinker with a recipe which he had been developing for years. In 1949, he and three of his sons opened their own place on Glenway Avenue, near the top of a steep hill (Price’s or Price Hill). That diner was located at the intersection of what is now Quebec and Glenway Avenue. The owners named it Skyline Chili for its panoramic view of downtown Cincinnati. After some local resistance in the predominantly Roman Catholic neighborhood Skyline developed a large and devoted following – especially on Thursdays and Saturdays, which immediately preceded and proceeded meatless Fridays.

The family opened a second restaurant in 1953 and the growth of the business accelerated in the 1960s; by the end of the century, there were 110 Skyline restaurants, mostly in Ohio, but with additional establishments in other states including Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida.
Skyline Cheese Coney
Lambrinides died in 1962 at the age of 82, but his sons continued to operate and expand the company. They retained the original recipe unchanged, though. According to William Lambrinides, “Dad always said, ‘Don’t change a thing with the recipe – don’t add anything, don’t take out anything, it’s perfect the way it is’.” As a result, Skyline’s version has largely become synonymous with “Cincinnati-style chili“. In 1998, the company was sold to Fleet Equity Partners, a New England investment firm, which promised not to change the recipe (which they reportedly keep locked in a safe).

Skyline Chili is unique in that it is not chili con carne, the meat dish that originated in (and is the state dish of) Texas. Instead, Cincinnati-style chili is a sauce usually used over spaghetti or hot dogs, containing a unique spice blend that gives it a very distinct taste. Officially, the recipe for Skyline Chili is a well-kept family secret among Lambrinides’ surviving children. However, many Skyline patrons and Cincinnatians believe that the unique taste of Skyline Chili comes from chocolate and cinnamon, spices common in Greek cuisine’s meat dishes. The general recipe is not unique to Skyline — “Cincinnati-style” chili is sold by several chili parlors in the area including Empress, Dixie, Gold Star Chili, Camp Washington, Dawson’s School House of Chili, and other chili parlors.

Skyline’s menu includes their signature dishes: cheese coneys (a hot dog topped with Skyline Chili, mustard, onions, and cheese), and 3-ways (spaghetti topped with Skyline Chili and cheese; 4-ways (choice of beans or onions added), and 5-ways (beans and onions both added). Additional menu items include burritos made with Skyline Chili, classic and Greek-style salads, french fries, and baked potatoes topped with Skyline Chili. To accommodate patrons who follow a low carbohydrate diet, Skyline has recently offered low-carb options such as a “coney bowl”—a cheese coney without the bun, and also now serves vegetarian options, using beans and rice in place of chili in many of its dishes.

 

http://skylinechili.com/

Attention all Gold Star Chili lovers, the Footlong is back!

June 18, 2012 at 9:46 AM | Posted in beans, cheese, chili, Food | Leave a comment
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GOLD STAR CHILI
Attention all Gold Star Chili lovers, the Footlong is back!

 

Gold Star Chili, The Flavor of Cincinnati, has announced it is bringing back by popular demand Footlong Cheese Coneys during the summer months. Gold Star Chili is reintroducing three versions of its famous Cincinnati-style Footlong Cheese Coneys, including:

 
*The Classic Cincinnati-style Footlong — A 12-inch Bluegrass hot dog topped with Gold Star’s

Cincinnati-style chili and shredded cheddar cheese on a specially baked Klosterman bun

 
*The Tex Mex Footlong — Topped with Gold Star’s specially blended TexMex chili

 
*The Fire House Footlong — Topped with Gold Star Chili and its unique roasted red pepper sauce and five-pepper spice mix

 
Gold Star also is offering a combo meal featuring a Footlong Cheese Coney, fries and a drink for $5. The $5 Footlong Combo Meals are available for a limited time only, June 8 through Aug. 23, 2009, at all Gold Star Chili locations.

http://www.goldstarchili.com/

Skyline 3 Way tonight!

March 3, 2012 at 6:38 PM | Posted in chili, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, spaghetti, spices and herbs | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu; Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers

It’s been forever and a day since I’ve had a Skyline 3 Way, and it was worth the wait! If your from the Cincinnati area you know Chili Spaghetti is a way of life around here. The Chili Wars have been raging around here for a long time. I’ve always been a Skyline Chili man myself. Just something about their recipe. A little spicy with a hint of sweet and loaded with spices. The recipe remains a top secret and probaly will be forever. When I was diagnosed with Diabetes2 I changed my diet and eating habits and through a lot of work I finally reversed my Diabetes2 and off all medication for it. i’ve been off it for a while now and had my first Domino’s Pizza back in January so I thought now it’s time for my first Skyline 3 Way! They now sell it packaged for the microwave, a bit smaller size than what you get at a Skyline but just right for those stll watching calories and carbs. It comes with Spaghetti topped with that wonderful Skyline Chili. You add the Cheese to make it a 3 Way. I used Kraft 2% Shredded Sharp Cheese and also had a side of Skyline Oyster Crackers. Overall it was just over 400 calories and 33 carbs. For dessert later a bowl of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla ice Cream topped with Del Monte No Sugar Added Sliced Peaches. Below i left a little info and history about Skyline Chili.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A 4-way with onions and oyster crackers from Skyline.

A 4-way with onions and oyster crackers from Skyline.

Skyline Chili

Skyline Chili is a chain of chili restaurants based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Founded in 1949 by Greek immigrant Nicholas Lambrinides, Skyline Chili is named for the view of Cincinnati’s skyline that Lambrinides could see from his first restaurant (which has since been demolished), opened in the section of town now known as Price Hill. It is also the “official chili” of many local professional sports teams and venues, including the Cincinnati Reds, Columbus Blue Jackets and the Kings Island theme park, and also sponsors the Crosstown Shootout, an annual men’s college basketball rivalry game between the city’s two NCAA Division I teams, Cincinnati and Xavier.

In 1912, Nicholas Lambrinides immigrated to Cincinnati from Kastoria, Greece, and brought his favorite family recipes with him. To save up the money to bring his wife to America as well, he first worked as a cook for a railroad crew and in a hotel kitchen, then opened a short-order diner. After nearly a decade, his wife was able to join him in Cincinnati and they raised five sons.

By World War II, Lambrinides was working as a chef for the original Empress Chili restaurant, where he continued to tinker with a recipe which he had been developing for years. In 1949, he and three of his sons opened their own place on Glenway Avenue, near the top of a steep hill (Price’s or Price Hill). That diner was located at the intersection of what is now Quebec and Glenway Avenue. The owners named it Skyline Chili for its panoramic view of downtown Cincinnati. After some local resistance in the predominantly Roman Catholic neighborhood  Skyline developed a large and devoted following – especially on Thursdays and Saturdays, which immediately preceded and proceeded meatless Fridays.

The family opened a second restaurant in 1953 and the growth of the business accelerated in the 1960s; by the end of the century, there were 110 Skyline restaurants, mostly in Ohio, but with additional establishments in other states including Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida.

Skyline Cheese Coney

Lambrinides died in 1962 at the age of 82, but his sons continued to operate and expand the company. They retained the original recipe unchanged, though. According to William Lambrinides, “Dad always said, ‘Don’t change a thing with the recipe – don’t add anything, don’t take out anything, it’s perfect the way it is’.” As a result, Skyline’s version has largely become synonymous with “Cincinnati-style chili“. In 1998, the company was sold to Fleet Equity Partners, a New England investment firm, which promised not to change the recipe (which they reportedly keep locked in a safe).

Skyline Chili is unique in that it is not chili con carne, the meat dish that originated in (and is the state dish of) Texas. Instead, Cincinnati-style chili is a sauce usually used over spaghetti or hot dogs, containing a unique spice blend that gives it a very distinct taste. Officially, the recipe for Skyline Chili is a well-kept family secret among Lambrinides’ surviving children. However, many Skyline patrons and Cincinnatians believe that the unique taste of Skyline Chili comes from chocolate and cinnamon, spices common in Greek cuisine’s meat dishes. The general recipe is not unique to Skyline — “Cincinnati-style” chili is sold by several chili parlors in the area including Empress, Dixie, Gold Star Chili, Camp Washington, Dawson’s School House of Chili, and other chili parlors.

Skyline’s menu includes their signature dishes: cheese coneys (a hot dog topped with Skyline Chili, mustard, onions, and cheese), and 3-ways (spaghetti topped with Skyline Chili and cheese; 4-ways (choice of beans or onions added), and 5-ways (beans and onions both added). Additional menu items include burritos made with Skyline Chili, classic and Greek-style salads, french fries, and baked potatoes topped with Skyline Chili. To accommodate patrons who follow a low carbohydrate diet, Skyline has recently offered low-carb options such as a “coney bowl”—a cheese coney without the bun, and also now serves vegetarian options, using beans and rice in place of chili in many of its dishes.

http://skylinechili.com/

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