Christmas Time – Fruitcake

December 8, 2016 at 5:59 AM | Posted in dessert, One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Traditional American Fruitcake

Traditional American Fruitcake

Fruitcake (or fruit cake) is a cake made with chopped candied fruit and/or dried fruit, nuts, and spices, and (occasionally) soaked in spirits. A cake that simply has fruit in it as an ingredient can also be colloquially called a fruit cake. In the United Kingdom, certain rich versions may be iced and decorated.

Fruit cakes are typically served in celebration of weddings and Christmas. Given their rich nature, fruit cake is most often consumed on its own, as opposed to with condiments (such as butter or cream).

 

 

 
The earliest recipe from ancient Rome lists pomegranate seeds, pine nuts, and raisins that were mixed into barley mash. In the Middle Ages, honey, spices, and preserved fruits were added.

Fruit cakes soon proliferated all over Europe. Recipes varied greatly in different countries throughout the ages, depending on the available ingredients as well as (in some instances) church regulations forbidding the use of butter, regarding the observance of fast. Pope Innocent VIII (1432–1492) finally granted the use of butter, in a written permission known as the ‘Butter Letter’ or Butterbrief in 1490, giving permission to Saxony to use milk and butter in the North German Stollen fruit cakes.

Starting in the 16th century, sugar from the American Colonies (and the discovery that high concentrations of sugar could preserve fruits) created an excess of candied fruit, thus making fruit cakes more affordable and popular.

 

 
In the United States

Traditional American fruit cake with fruits and nuts.

Traditional American fruit cake with fruits and nuts.

Typical American fruit cakes are rich in fruit and nuts.

Mail-order fruit cakes in America began in 1913. Some well-known American bakers of fruit cake include Collin Street Bakery in Corsicana, Texas, and The Claxton Bakery in Claxton, Georgia. Both Collin Street and Claxton are Southern companies with inexpensive access to large nut quantities, for which the expression “nutty as a fruitcake” was derived in 1935. Commercial fruit cakes are often sold from catalogs by charities as a fund raiser.

Most American mass-produced fruit cakes are alcohol-free, but traditional recipes are saturated with liqueurs or brandy and covered in powdered sugar, both of which prevent mold. Brandy (or wine) soaked linens can be used to store the fruit cakes, and some people feel that fruit cakes improve with age.

In the United States, the fruit cake has been a ridiculed dessert. Some attribute the beginning of this trend with The Tonight Show host Johnny Carson. He would joke that there really is only one fruitcake in the world, passed from family to family. After Carson’s death, the tradition continued with “The Fruitcake Lady” (Marie Rudisill), who made appearances on the show and offered her “fruitcake” opinions. In fact, the fruitcake had been a butt of jokes on television programs such as Father Knows Best and The Donna Reed Show years before The Tonight Show debuted and appears to have first become a vilified confection in the early 20th century, as evidenced by Warner Brothers cartoons.

Since 1995, Manitou Springs, Colorado, has hosted the Great Fruitcake Toss on the first Saturday of every January. “We encourage the use of recycled fruitcakes,” says Leslie Lewis of the Manitou Springs Chamber of Commerce. The all-time Great Fruitcake Toss record is 1,420 feet, set in January 2007 by a group of eight Boeing engineers who built the “Omega 380,” a mock artillery piece fueled by compressed air pumped by an exercise bike.
When a fruit cake contains a good deal of alcohol, it can remain edible for many years. For example, a fruit cake baked in 1878 is kept as an heirloom by a family (Morgan L. Ford) in Tecumseh, Michigan. In 2003 it was sampled by Jay Leno on The Tonight Show. Wrapping the cake in alcohol-soaked linen before storing is one method of lengthening its shelf life.

 

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

December 8, 2016 at 5:56 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

The perfect Fruitcake…..

 
* To keep holes and tunnels out of your cake, run a knife through the batter after you have finished mixing it. This removes air holes.

* Soak fruit and nuts at least overnight in fruit juice or liquors to soften, drain and use excess liquid in recipe.

* Dredge fruit and nuts with some flour so they won’t sink in batter. Shake off excess flour and use in the recipe.

* Don’t freeze a fruitcake right away. Let it age at least 3 to 4 weeks first so it has a chance to build its flavor (ripen).

Christmas Treat – Fruitcake

December 20, 2015 at 12:39 PM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

FruitcakeFruit cake

Fruitcake (or fruit cake) is a cake made with chopped candied fruit and/or dried fruit, nuts, and spices, and (optionally) soaked in spirits. A cake that simply has fruit in it as an ingredient can also be colloquially called a fruit cake. In the United Kingdom, certain rich versions may be iced and decorated.

Fruit cakes are often served in celebration of weddings and Christmas. Given their rich nature, fruit cake is most often consumed on its own, as opposed to with condiments (such as butter or cream).

 
The earliest recipe from ancient Rome lists pomegranate seeds, pine nuts, and raisins that were mixed into barley mash. In the Middle Ages, honey, spices, and preserved fruits were added.

Fruit cakes soon proliferated all over Europe. Recipes varied greatly in different countries throughout the ages, depending on the available ingredients as well as (in some instances) church regulations forbidding the use of butter, regarding the observance of fast. Pope Innocent VIII (1432–1492) finally granted the use of butter, in a written permission known as the ‘Butter Letter’ or Butterbrief in 1490, giving permission to Saxony to use milk and butter in the North German Stollen fruit cakes.

Starting in the 16th century, sugar from the American Colonies (and the discovery that high concentrations of sugar could preserve fruits) created an excess of candied fruit, thus making fruit cakes more affordable and popular.

13 Healthy Holiday Swaps

December 4, 2015 at 6:11 AM | Posted in diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Diabetes and Holiday eating, no problem! From the Diabetic Living Online website it’s 13 Healthy Holiday Swaps. Dips, Shrimp, Fruitcake and more! It’s all on the Diabetic Living Online website, home of the Diabetic Friendly Recipes. http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 
13 Healthy Holiday SwapsDiabetic living logo

Do you have diabetes and wonder: What can I eat at holiday parties and dinners? We have great tips to make healthier choices so you can still be festive while managing your weight and blood sugar goals.
Best Choices for Holiday Eating

The holidays are all about get-togethers with family, friends, and colleagues — and what holiday gathering would be complete without food? But there’s no need to worry about blowing your calorie and carb budget. With these 13 simple swaps, you can enjoy the holiday season confident and guilt-free.

 

 

Chip Dip

Ready to dip those chips? Choose fresh salsa over cheese dip, and you’ll save 125 calories and 12 grams of carb per 1/2 cup.

Bonus: You’ll save 4 grams of saturated fat — plus, a colorful red and green salsa is sure to complement your holiday decor……

 
Skinny Shrimp

There’s no need to avoid appetizers while mingling. Save 113 calories and 1 gram of carb by selecting three jumbo shrimp and 2 tablespoons of cocktail sauce instead of three pigs in a blanket.

Bonus: In addition to saving 4.5 grams of saturated fat by choosing the shrimp, you can also be stylish — it’s hard to look holiday chic when gobbling down something called pigs in a blanket…..

 
Forget the Fruitcake

Pass up that slice of Aunt Fanny’s fruitcake and nibble on a decorative sugar cookie instead. You’ll save 79 calories and 19 grams of carb.

Bonus: Any leftover sugar cookies make the perfect gift for your lovable neighbors…..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all 13 Healthy Holiday Swaps

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/nutrition/13-healthy-holiday-swaps

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Gluten-free Delight

Homemade and delicious

Grow Your Health Gardening

Tips for Hydroponic, Aeroponic, Aquaponic, and Soil-based Gardening Methods

Don't hold your breath

Tripping the world, slowly

Healthaware

Health is Wealth

Hapanese Cuisine

Eats and Treats from Your Favorite Half-Asian

Food For Thought

Changing your life, one recipe at a time.

asliceofkatecom.wordpress.com/

Where you can never have too many slices

A Series by Liz & Angie

Cards (and more) made from the heart.

fivethumbsupblog

Making awesome food.

Best of Vegan

Your #1 Resource for Vegan Cooking

The Simple Seagan

Simple recipes for the vegan, who sometimes eats seafood.

Life on Lavender

Building a Beautiful Life as a Single Mama

Today's Furry Moments

Life with 5 chickens, a food-obsessed dog, a cranky beardie and a crazy cat. Oh, and some fish.

Front Porch Bakery

Made-From-Scratch Made Simple

pyritewealth

Just another WordPress site.

R & L Foods

Enjoy Our Foods