Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 26, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Keeping your Chicken crispy……………..

After you’ve finished frying the first batch of your chicken, don’t let it get cold and soggy sitting on a pile of paper towels. Hold it hot in a 250° F oven! Placing the chicken on an oven-proof cooling rack set inside a quality baking sheet is the best way to keep the chicken from getting soggy. Nothing like a good Fried Chicken Dinner!

Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes

December 29, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes. I love Chicken Thighs, and here’s some Delicious and Healthy Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes. Find recipes like Easy Chicken Enchilada Casserole, Southern-Style Oven-Fried Chicken, and Huli Huli Chicken with Pineapple-Ginger Sauce. Find these recipes and many more all at the EatingWell website. Plus don’t forget you can subscribe to the EatingWell Magazine, one of my favorites! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes
Find healthy, delicious baked chicken thigh recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Easy Chicken Enchilada Casserole
Casseroles make perfect meal-prep dinners–this enchilada version is so easy to prep ahead. The whole casserole can be built and left to hang out in the refrigerator for up to three days. Then all you have to do is bake it off on a busy night and you have a healthy dinner on the table in a jiff. The quick homemade enchilada sauce in this recipe is great when you don’t have any of the canned sauce on hand–just season crushed tomatoes with spices and salt for an instant enchilada sauce…………………

Southern-Style Oven-Fried Chicken
A blend of dried spices gives the crispy panko coating on these oven-fried chicken thighs plenty of flavor, and marinating the chicken in buttermilk makes it moist and juicy. If you don’t have an oven-safe skillet, you can roast the chicken in a baking dish in Step 5. Serve with your favorite vegetables (bake them alongside the chicken to make it easy) for a healthy comfort food dinner that requires just 20 minutes of active prep time……………………………….

Huli Huli Chicken with Pineapple-Ginger Sauce
“Huli” is a Hawaiian word that means to turn over. Traditional versions of this dish are grilled, constantly turning the chicken back and forth as a rotisserie would. This easy recipe is made in the oven to save you time and elbow grease. Recipe adapted from Chef Greg Harrison, Pacific’O Restaurant……………………….

* Click the link below to get all the Baked Chicken Thigh Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/20651/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/thighs/baked/

Healthy Fried Chicken Recipes

December 15, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 2 Comments
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Fried Chicken Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Fried Chicken Recipes with recipes including Creamy Lemon Chicken Parmesan, Chicken-Fried Turkey Cutlets with Redeye Gravy, and Fried Chicken Salad with Buttermilk Dressing. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Fried Chicken Recipes
Find healthy, delicious fried chicken recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Creamy Lemon Chicken Parmesan
This riff on classic chicken Parmesan replaces the usual marinara with a luscious lemony cream sauce. We’ve lightened it up by using half-and-half instead of cream, with just-as-delicious results. Serve this lemony chicken dinner with whole-wheat pasta or brown rice………………

Chicken-Fried Turkey Cutlets with Redeye Gravy
Redeye gravy is a Southerner’s trick of using coffee to make a quick pan gravy from the drippings that remain in the pan after frying ham steaks. In this lightened version we use lean turkey breast cutlets breaded and “fried” in a little canola oil, with just a bit of bacon for flavor in the gravy. Recipe by Joyce Hendley for EatingWell……………………..

Fried Chicken Salad with Buttermilk Dressing
A blend of whole-wheat panko and fine cornmeal gives this healthy chicken recipe the perfect amount of crunch even though it’s not deep fried. Making an easy homemade buttermilk ranch dressing recipe means you can skip bottled, which may have additives and stabilizers……………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Fried Chicken Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18941/ingredients/meat-poultry/chicken/fried/

One of America’s Favorites – Fried Chicken

May 27, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Fried Chicken – A chicken breast, wing, leg and thigh fried

Fried chicken (also referred to as Southern fried chicken for the variant in the United States) is a dish consisting of chicken pieces usually from broiler chickens which have been floured or battered and then pan-fried, deep fried, or pressure fried. The breading adds a crisp coating or crust to the exterior of the chicken. What separates fried chicken from other fried forms of chicken is that generally the chicken is cut at the joints, and the bones and skin are left intact. Crisp well-seasoned skin, rendered of excess fat, is a hallmark of well made fried chicken.

The first dish known to have been deep fried was fritters, which were popular in the European Middle Ages. However, it was the Scottish who were the first Europeans to deep fry their chicken in fat (though without seasoning). Meanwhile, a number of West African peoples had traditions of seasoned fried chicken (though battering and cooking the chicken in palm oil). Scottish frying techniques and West African seasoning techniques were combined by enslaved Africans and African-Americans in the American South.

When being cooked, fried chicken is often divided into smaller pieces. The chicken is then generally covered in a batter, often consisting of ingredients such as eggs or milk, and a thickener such as flour. This is used to create a crust on the exterior of the meat. In addition, seasoning is often added at this stage. Once the chicken is ready to be cooked, it is placed in a deep fryer, frying pan or pressure cooker (depending on the method used) and fried in lard or a type of oil.

Paschal’s fried chicken, Atlanta, Georgia

Fried chicken has been described as being “crunchy” and “juicy”, as well as “crispy”. In addition, the dish has also been called “spicy” and “salty”. Occasionally, fried chicken is also topped with a chili like paprika, or hot sauce to give it a spicy taste. This is especially common in fast food restaurants and chains such as KFC. The dish is traditionally served with mashed potato, gravy, macaroni and cheese, coleslaw and biscuits.

The dish is renowned for being greasy, especially when coming from fast food outlets. It has even been reported that some of those who enjoy eating the food limit themselves to eating it only a certain number of times a year, to keep their fat intake reasonably low. Out of the various parts of the animal used in fried chicken, the wings generally tend to contain the most fat, with almost 40 grams (0.088 lb) of fat for every 100 grams (0.22 lb). However, the average whole fried chicken contains only around 12% fat, or 12 grams (0.026 lb) per every 100 grams (0.22 lb). As well as this, 100 grams (0.22 lb) grams of fried chicken generally contains around 240 calories of energy.

One of the main causes of the large amounts of fat which can be found in fried chicken is the oil which is used to cook it.

Generally, chickens are not fried whole; instead, the chicken is divided into its constituent pieces. The two white meat sections are the breast and the wing from the front of the chicken, while the dark meat sections are the thigh and leg or “drumstick” from the rear of the chicken. These pieces are usually subdivided into the wings, the breasts (the wishbone is often cut out first in home cooking), the legs, and the thighs. The ribs are sometimes left on the breast, but commercially they and the back are usually discarded. Chicken fingers, which are boneless pieces of chicken breast cut into long strips, are also commonly used.

To prepare the chicken pieces for frying, they may be coated in a batter of flour and liquid (and seasonings) mixed together. The batter can contain ingredients like eggs, milk, and leavening. Alternatively, they may be dredged in flour or a similar dry substance, to coat the meat and to develop a crust. Seasonings such as salt, pepper, cayenne pepper, paprika, garlic powder, onion powder, or ranch dressing mix can be mixed in with the flour. Either process may be preceded by marination or by dipping in buttermilk, the acidity of which acts as a eat tenderizer. As the pieces of chicken cook, some of the moisture that exudes from the chicken is absorbed by the coating of flour and browns along with the flour, creating a flavorful crust. According to Nathan Bailey’s 1736 cookbook, Dictionarium Domesticum, for example, the chicken can be covered in a marinade that consists of the juice of two large fresh lemons, malt vinegar, bay leaves, salt, pepper, ground cloves, and green onions; it then must be settled in the marinade for three hours before being dipped in the batter that consists of all-purpose flour, white wine, three egg yolks and salt, and then slowly submerged in a deep pot of either oil, lard, or clarified butter over an open fire. It can then be topped with fresh, dried parsley dipped in the same frying oil.

Traditionally, lard is used to fry the chicken, but corn oil, peanut oil, canola oil, or vegetable oil are also frequently used (although clarified butter may be used as well like in colonial times. The flavor of olive oil is generally considered too strong to be used for traditional fried chicken, and its low smoke point makes it unsuitable for use. There are three main techniques for frying chickens: pan frying, deep frying and broasting.

Frying chicken upper wings in corn oil

Pan frying (or shallow frying) requires a frying pan of sturdy construction and a source of fat that does not fully immerse the chicken. The chicken pieces are prepared as above, then fried. Generally the fat is heated to a temperature hot enough to seal (without browning, at this point) the outside of the chicken pieces. Once the pieces have been added to the hot fat and sealed, the temperature is reduced. There is debate as to how often to turn the chicken pieces, with one camp arguing for often turning and even browning, and the other camp pushing for letting the pieces render skin side down and only turning when absolutely necessary. Once the chicken pieces are close to being done the temperature is raised and the pieces are browned to the desired color (some cooks add small amounts of butter at this point to enhance browning). The moisture from the chicken that sticks and browns on the bottom of the pan become the fonds required to make gravy.

Deep frying requires a deep fryer or other device in which the chicken pieces can be completely submerged in hot fat. The process of deep frying is basically placing food fully in oil and then cooking it at a very high temperature. The pieces are prepared as described above. The fat is heated in the deep fryer to the desired temperature. The pieces are added to the fat and a constant temperature is maintained throughout the cooking process.

Broasting uses a pressure cooker to accelerate the process. The moisture inside the chicken becomes steam and increases the pressure in the cooker, lowering the cooking temperature needed. The steam also cooks the chicken through, but still allows the pieces to be moist and tender while maintaining a crisp coating. Fat is heated in a pressure cooker. Chicken pieces are prepared as described above and then placed in the hot fat. The lid is placed on the pressure cooker, and the chicken pieces are thus fried under pressure.

The derivative phrases “country fried” and “chicken fried” often refer to other foods prepared in the manner of fried chicken. Usually, this means a boneless, tenderized piece of meat that has been floured or battered and cooked in any of the methods described. Chicken fried steak is a common dish of that variety. Such dishes are often served with gravy.

Fried chicken

Variants
* Barberton chicken, also known as Serbian Fried Chicken, is a version created by Serbian immigrants in Barberton, Ohio, that has been popularized throughout that state.
* Chicken Maryland, a form of pan-fried chicken, often marinated in buttermilk, served with cream gravy and native to the state of Maryland. The recipe spread beyond the United States to the haute cuisine of Auguste Escoffier and, after heavy modification, found a place in the cuisines of Britain and Australia. The dish is made when a pan of chicken pieces and fat, as for pan frying, is placed in the oven to cook, for a majority of the overall cooking time, basically “fried in the oven”.
* Popcorn chicken, also known as chicken bites or other similar terms, are small morsels of boneless chicken, battered and fried, resulting in small pieces that resemble popcorn.
* Chicken and waffles, a combination platter of foods traditionally served at breakfast and dinner in one meal, common to soul food restaurants in the American South and beyond.
* Hot chicken: common in the Nashville, Tennessee area, a pan-fried variant of fried chicken coated with lard and cayenne pepper paste.
* Fried chicken sandwiches: a bun, biscuit or doughnut which is filled with fried chicken and assorted toppings, popular in Washington, D.C.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 29, 2018 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Jenny G. for passing this hint along……..

Frying Chicken? After flouring chicken, chill for 1 hour. The coating adheres better during frying.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 10, 2018 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Fried chicken…….

Thank you to Mini for passing this hint along – After flouring chicken, chill for 1 hour. The coating adheres better during frying.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 21, 2017 at 6:32 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Don’t crowd the Chicken…..

Do not overcrowd chicken pieces when cooking. Leaving space between them will allow them to brown and cook more evenly. Also allow your chicken to rest after it has been cooked. All the natural juices will soak back into the meat instead of being left on the baking sheet. Now enjoy that Chicken!

One of America’s Favorites – Chicken and Waffles

October 2, 2017 at 5:24 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Soul food style chicken and waffles, served with peaches and cream as dessert

Chicken and waffles refers to either of two American dishes – one from soul food, the other Pennsylvania Dutch – that combine chicken with waffles. It is served in certain specialty restaurants in the United States.

 

 

 

 

The best known chicken and waffle pairing comes from the American soul food tradition and uses fried chicken. The waffle is served as it would be at breakfast time, with condiments such as butter and syrup. This unusual combination of foods is beloved by many people who are influenced by traditions of soul food passed down from past generations of their families. This version of the dish is highly popular in Baltimore, Maryland, enough to become a well-known local custom.

 

Chicken and waffles

The exact origins of this dish are unknown, although several theories about its origin exist. Waffles entered American cuisine in the 1600s with European colonists. The food’s popularity saw a notable boost after 1789 with Thomas Jefferson’s purchase of a waffle iron in France.

In the early 1800s, hotels and resorts outside Philadelphia served waffles with fried catfish. Such establishments also served other dishes like fried chicken, which gradually became the meat of choice due to catfish’s limited, seasonal availability. Waffles served with chicken and gravy were noted as a common Sunday dish among the Pennsylvania Dutch by the 1860s. By the end of the 19th century, the dish was a symbol of Pennsylvania Dutch Country, brought on in part by its association with tourism.

In 1909, a Griswold’s waffle iron advertisement promised, “You can attend a chicken and waffle supper right at home any time you have the notion if you are the owner of a Griswold’s American Waffle Iron.”

The traditional origin of the dish states that because African-Americans in the South rarely had the opportunity to eat chicken and were more familiar with flapjacks or pancakes than with waffles, they considered the dish a delicacy. For decades, it remained “a special-occasion meal in African-American families.” However, other historians cite a scarcity of actual early era evidence of the dish’s existence in the South, and place the origin later, after the post-Civil War migration of Southern African-Americans to the North during the Reconstruction Era. The combination of chicken and waffles does not appear in early Southern cookbooks such as Mrs. Porter’s Southern Cookery Book, published in 1871 or in What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, published in 1881 by former slave Abby Fisher. Fisher’s cookbook is generally considered the first cookbook written by an African-American. The lack of a recipe for the combination of chicken and waffles in Southern cookbooks from the era may suggest a later origin for the dish.

Whatever the case, many modern variants of the dish owe their origins to the meal as it was served in the African-American community in early 20th-century Harlem, New York. The dish was served as early as the 1930s in such Harlem locations as Tillie’s Chicken Shack, Dickie Wells’ jazz nightclub, and particularly the Wells Supper Club. Harlem-style chicken and waffles have been popular in Los Angeles since the 1970s due to the fame of former Harlem resident Herb Hudson’s restaurant Roscoe’s House of Chicken and Waffles, which has become known as a favorite of some Hollywood celebrities and been referenced in several movies.

 

 

Top 10 Diabetic Chicken Dinner Recipes

September 23, 2017 at 5:37 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website its their Top 10 Diabetic Chicken Dinner Recipes. 10 Delicious and Diabetic Friendly Chicken Recipes! Recipes including; Alfredo-Sauced Chicken, Crispy Oven-Fried Chicken, and Farro-Stuffed Chicken with Sweet and Spicy Squash . Find these and all the rest at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

Top 10 Diabetic Chicken Dinner Recipes
You can have a fresh, flavorful, satisfying meal that is diabetes-friendly — and it won’t cost a fortune or take all night to prepare. Enjoy this collection of 10 distinctive diabetic chicken recipes that elevate dinner from dull to delicious.

 

Alfredo-Sauced Chicken
Make a meal the whole family will rave about. A creamy Alfredo sauce blankets chicken, pasta, and fresh veggies for a restaurant-style meal under 400 calories and 35 grams of carb per serving. Plus, get Chef’s Secret tips for a flawless finish…….

 

Crispy Oven-Fried Chicken
Craving fried chicken but don’t want all the excess fat and calories? Enjoy the best of both worlds with this low-carb chicken recipe that boasts just 13 grams of carb per serving. Marinate before breading for the perfect oven-fried chicken meal…….

 

Farro-Stuffed Chicken with Sweet and Spicy Squash
A twist on chicken and rice, this healthy comfort food recipe is a carb-smart choice for people with diabetes. Featuring a whopping 39 grams of protein per serving, this superfood chicken meal is sure to be a fall favorite………

 

* Click the link below to get the Top 10 Diabetic Chicken Dinner Recipes

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/chicken/top-10-diabetic-chicken-dinner-recipes

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 28, 2017 at 6:34 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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Here’s one I haven’t tried but our neighbor uses all the time…….

 
For golden brown chicken every time, put a few drops of yellow food coloring in the shortening before it has heated.

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