The Sunday Pizza – Pizza Provolone

February 21, 2016 at 6:23 AM | Posted in Sunday Pizza | Leave a comment
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This week’s Sunday Pizza is a Pizza Provolone. Top the pizza with a blend of provolone and fontina cheese, crumbled Italian sausage, roasted garlic and green onions. Please one and please them all with this week’s pizza! It’s from one of my favorite sites the CooksRecipes website. http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 
Pizza Provolone

Pizza topped with a cheese blend of provolone and fontina, crumbled Italian sausage, roasted garlic and green onions.

Recipe Ingredients:Cooksrecipes 2

1 (12-inch) pizza crust
4 ounces pizza sauce
2 cups shredded Wisconsin Sharp Provolone & Fontina Blend
4 ounces Italian sausage, cooked and crumbled
1 tablespoon roasted chopped garlic
8 whole green onions

Cooking Directions:

1 – Spread pizza sauce on crust. Add 7 ounces of cheese blend. Sprinkle cooked sausage, garlic and whole green onions, placed like spokes on a wheel, on top of the cheese. Finish by spreading remaining cheese on top.
2 – Bake in a preheated oven at 450°F (230°C) for 8 to 10 minutes.
Makes 4 servings.
http://www.cooksrecipes.com/pizza_recipes/pizza_provolone_recipe.html

Cheese of the Week – Fontina

June 17, 2012 at 10:06 AM | Posted in cheese, Food | 2 Comments
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Fontina

Fontina is a cow’s milk Italian cheese. Fontina cheese has been made in the Aosta Valley, in the Alps since the 12th century. It has a milk fat content of around 45%. As with many original varieties, the name “Fontina” has been imposed upon by such derivatives as

Fontina Cheese

“Fontinella”, “Fontal“, and “Fontella”. Italian Fontina can be identified by a Consorzio (Consortium) stamp of the Matterhorn including the script “FONTINA”. Although the version from Aosta is the original and the most famous, Fontina production occurs in other parts of Italy, as well as Denmark, Sweden, Quebec, France and the United States. The original Fontina cheese from Italy is fairly pungent and has quite an intense flavor, although cheeses labeled Fontina that are produced in other countries can be much milder. The Danish version is often found in US grocery stores, and can be distinguished from Italian Fontina by the red wax rind (Italian Fontina has a natural rind due to aging, which is usually tan to orange-brown); Danish Fontina is aged less and therefore semi-soft and much milder than its Italian counterpart.
Fontina Val d’Aosta must be made from unpasteurised milk from a single milking, with two batches being made per day. It is noted for its earthy, mushroomy, and woody taste, and pairs exceedingly well with roast meats and truffles.
Young Fontina has a softer texture (and can be suitable for fondue). Fonduta is a traditional dish of Fontina whipped with eggs and cream. Mature Fontina is a hard cheese. Fontina has a mild, somewhat nutty flavor, while rich, herbaceous and fruity. It melts well.
The Milk and Fontina Producers Co-Operative was formed in 1957. The co-operative collects from around 400 producers to market 400,000 cheeses, or 3,500 tons, per year.
Fontina has PDO status under European law.

Four Cheese Panini With Basil Tomatoes

Ingredients
1/2 cup shredded fresh mozzarella cheese ( 3 ounces)
1/2 cup shredded Fontina cheese ( 4 ounces)
3 tablespoons asiago cheese (freshly grated) or 3 tablespoons parmesan cheese ( freshly grated)
1/2 cup shredded provolone cheese ( 3 ounces)
8 slices tomatoes, thinly sliced
1 tablespoon fresh basil, chopped
4 ciabatta rolls, halved lengthwise (spread outsides with butter) or 8 slices firm white bread ( spread outsides with butter)
8 arugula leaves ( optional, but recommended)
Directions
In a small bowl, combine cheeses. Spread the cheese on the bottoms of the ciabatta rolls. Top with tomato slices and brush with olive oil. Sprinkle with basil and add 2 arugula leaves and close the panini.
Set a large cast-iron skillet or griddle over moderately high heat. Arrange the panini in skillet and weight them down with a smaller pan (can fill with water if you need more weight). Cook the panini until the outside is crisp and the cheese is melted, 3 minutes per side.
Cut panini in half and serve at once.

Nutritional Facts for Four Cheese Panini With Basil Tomatoes
Serving Size: 1 (88 g)
Servings Per Recipe: 4
Amount Per Serving
% Daily Value
Calories 160.8

Calories from Fat 106
66%
Total Fat 11.8 g
18%
Saturated Fat 7.2 g
36%
Cholesterol 38.1 mg
12%
Sodium 343.4 mg
14%
Total Carbohydrate 2.6 g
0%
Dietary Fiber 0.5 g
2%
Sugars 1.5 g
6%
Protein 11.2 g
22%

Cheese of the Week – Danish Fontina

May 9, 2012 at 9:22 AM | Posted in cheese, Food | Leave a comment
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Danish Fontina is pale yellow and semi-soft with a mild slightly sweet flavor. A derivative of its Italian namesake and a great table

Fontina cheese.

cheese that goes well with a light wine Fontina is also a good sandwich cheese.

Country: Denmark
Texture: semi-soft

Danish Fontina

Fontina is a cow’s milk Italian cheese. Fontina cheese has been made in the Aosta Valley, in the Alps since the 12th century. It has a milk fat content of around 45%. As with many original varieties, the name “Fontina” has been imposed upon by such derivatives as “Fontinella”, “Fontal“, and “Fontella”. Italian Fontina can be identified by a Consorzio (Consortium) stamp of the Matterhorn including the script “FONTINA”. Although the version from Aosta is the original and the most famous, Fontina production occurs in other parts of Italy, as well as Denmark, Sweden, Quebec, France and the United States. The original Fontina cheese from Italy is fairly pungent and has quite an intense flavor, although cheeses labeled Fontina that are produced in other countries can be much milder. The Danish version is is often found in US grocery stores, and can be distinguished from Italian Fontina by the red wax rind (Italian Fontina has a natural rind due to aging, which is usually tan to orange-brown); Danish Fontina is aged less and therefore semi-soft and much milder than its Italian counterpart.

Fontina Val d’Aosta must be made from unpasteurised milk from a single milking, with two batches being made per day. It is noted for its earthy, mushroomy, and woody taste, and pairs exceedingly well with roast meats and truffles.

Young Fontina has a softer texture (and can be suitable for fondue). Fonduta is a traditional dish of Fontina whipped with eggs and cream. Mature Fontina is a hard cheese. Fontina has a mild, somewhat nutty flavor, while rich, herbaceous and fruity. It melts well.

The Milk and Fontina Producers Co-Operative was formed in 1957. The co-operative collects from around 400 producers to market 400,000 cheeses, or 3,500 tons, per year.

Fontina has PDO status under European law.

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