Blackened Yellow Snapper Sandwich w/ Baked Fries

June 26, 2015 at 5:06 PM | Posted in fish, Ore - Ida | 3 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Blackened Yellow Snapper Sandwich w/ Baked Fries

 

Blackened Yellow Snapper Sandwich 009
Feeling a lot better today, now that I worked the soreness out from the tumble I took. Breakfast was so good yesterday I prepared the same thing this morning, Turkey Goetta and a Egg Beater’s Egg White Cheese Omelet. As a kid you couldn’t pay me to eat Egg Whites and now I actually prefer them over the yolk. Ah times are a changing! A lot of rain overnight and more on the way, actually South of us about 2-3 inches more! It was house cleaning day today; vacuum, dusting, and laundry. For dinner tonight I prepared one of my favorite sandwiches, the Fish sandwich. I prepared a Blackened Yellow Snapper Sandwich w/ Baked Fries.

 

 

Blackened Yellow Snapper Sandwich 001

In the package Grouper a buddy mine gave me I also found a couple of Yellowtail Snapper Fillets. Love the Snapper as much as I do the Grouper. And like the Grouper it can be prepared so many different ways, and all of them delicious! The Snapper was in the freezer so I laid them in the fridge overnight to thaw. To prepare tonight’s fillets I blackened them. I love to blacken any Fish, just so flavorful. I’m using Zatarain’s Blackening Season, which I almost always use.

 

 
To prepare the fillets I rinsed them off in cold water and patting dry with paper towel. I melted a tablespoon of Blackened Yellow Snapper Sandwich 004butter, Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter. I then brushed both sides of the fillets with the melted Butter and seasoned them with Sea Salt and then with Zatarain’s Blackened Seasoning. I then I got out my favorite skillet, The Cast Iron Skillet. When the pan was fully heated, on medium heat, I added my Snapper. At this point turn on your Stove Overhead Exhaust Fan on, it will start smoking from the seasoning. Cooked it about 4 minutes per side, and it was ready. Cast Iron Skillets are perfect to use for any cooking but especially when Blacken something. The Skillet heats up and holds it heat and the heat evenly distributes across the Skillet, perfect for Blackening Meats. This Snapper turned out so good, moist and bursting with flavor. Just something about the Gulf Seafood. The Zatarain’s Seasonings are perfect for any Seafood. I used a Perfection Deli Mini Wheat Sub Bun for the bread. There was no toppings need for this bad boy of Fish Sandwiches, its delicious all on its own! For a side I baked some Ore Ida Steak Fries, served these with a side of Hunt’s Ketchup for dipping. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 

 
Yellowtail Snapper

The yellowtail snapper, Ocyurus chrysurus, is an abundant species of snapper native to the western Atlantic Ocean including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea.

Identified by a yellow stripe that runs the full length of the body from forward of the eye to the deeply forked yellow tail. The stripe is vivid in young fish, but pales with maturity. Color above the line is bluish with yellow patches; silvery white below. No prominent teeth as in most other Snappers.

The yellowtail snapper is not listed as endangered or vulnerable with the World Conservation Union (IUCN). The IUCN is a global union of states, governmental agencies, and non-governmental organizations in a partnership that assesses the conservation status of species.

Blackened Grouper w/ Grain Medley and Sliced Carrots

January 20, 2015 at 6:07 PM | Posted in fish, Minute Rice | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Blackened Grouper w/ Grain Medley and Sliced CarrotsBlackend Grouper Grain Carrots 006

 
Not a bad day here in west Chester today, partly sunny and a high in the upper 40’s. I had a doctor’s appointment at 10:30 this morning. My 2 year checkup to make sure my Hip Replacement is doing good on the inside, a couple of x-rays and a physical exam and done. Everything looked great! Then later ran Mom and Dad for a checkup at their Family Doctor. Too many Doctors today! For dinner some Gulf Coast Grouper!, I prepared Blackened Grouper w/ Grain Medley and Sliced Carrots.

 

 

Yesterday some good friends of mine returned from Florida and brought me some Gulf Coast Grouper that they had just caught days before there in Florida. They have a home in Southern Florida along the Gulf Coast and go down quite often. And they usually bring me back some Grouper or Snapper on their return. Thank goodness they love fishing!

 

Blackend Grouper Grain Carrots 001

They had frozen the Grouper so I left it in the fridge overnight to thaw. To prepare it I rinsed the fillets off in cold water and patting dry and cut it into smaller pieces. I melted a tablespoon of butter, Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter. I then brushed both sides of the fillets with the Butter and seasoned them with Sea Salt and then with Zatarain’s Blackened Seasoning. Then I got out my favorite skillet, The Cast Iron Skillet. When the pan was fully heated, on medium heat, I added my Grouper. Cooked it about 4 minutes per side, and it was ready for the table! Cast Iron Skillets are perfect to use for any cooking but especially when Blacken something. The Skillet heats up and holds it heat and the heat evenly distributes across the Skillet, perfect for Blackening Meats. This fish turned out so good, hard to describe! Moist and bursting with flavor. Just something about Gulf Seafood. The Zatarain’s Seasonings are perfect for any Seafood.

 
For one side I prepared some Minute Multi Grain Medley. I love the Multi Grain, It has Brown Rice, Thai Red Rice, Wild Rice, and Quinoa. Now that’s a good combo of Grains! Plus it’s only 160 calories and 31 net carbs per serving, which isn’t bad for a Grain Dish. Then I also heated up a small can of Del Mote Sliced Carrots along with a slice of Pillsbury Rustic French Bread, which was leftover from last night’s meal. For dessert later a Healthy Choice dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 
Kitchen Dictionary: grouper
A fish weighing from 5-15 pounds. The flesh is lean and firm, but the skin is strongly flavored and should be removed before cooking. Popular varieties are the black grouper, Nassau grouper, red grouper and yellowmouth/yellowfin grouper.

Season: available year-roundBlackend Grouper Grain Carrots 005
* How to prepare: braise, grill, poach, saute, steam
* Matches well with: garlic, honey, lemon, mustard, spinach, white wine
* Substitutions: halibut, sea bass, snapper

Popular Grouper Recipes
* Baked Grouper Creole/Parmesan
* Blackened Grouper
* Caribbean Jerk Grouper
Nutrition Facts
Calculated for 1 fillet
Amount Per Serving %DV
Calories 238
Calories from Fat 23 (9%)
Total Fat 2.6g 4%
Saturated Fat 0.6g 3%
Monounsaturated Fat 0.0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.8g
Trans Fat 0.0g
Cholesterol 95mg 31%
Sodium 137mg 5%
Potassium 1250mg 35%
Total Carbohydrate 0.0g 0%

 
http://www.food.com/library/grouper-72

 
Minute Multi-Grain MedleyMinute Multi Grain Medley

* Minute® Multi-Grain Medley is a blend of four popular gluten-free 100% whole grains and is ready in only 10 minutes. The four grains include:
* Brown Rice – usually brown but can be black, purple, red or a variety of exotic hues.
* Thai Red Rice – also known as Khao Deng, is an ancient grain that has a pleasant and nutty flavor.
* Wild Rice – not technically rice at all but the seed of an aquatic grass. It has a strong, hearty flavor that goes well with other grains.
* Quinoa (pronounced “KEEN-wah”) – is a small, light-colored round grain, similar in appearance to sesame seeds. It cooks up light and fluffy. The protein in quinoa is a complete protein as it contains all nine essential amino acids.
This quick cooking whole grain medley is pre-portioned in 4 separate bags for ease of preparation and has a slightly chewy, nutty flavor. Perfect for any meal, even as a wholesome start to the day, this medley is great when eaten with a little olive oil and salt, cooked in meat/vegetable broths or fruit juices. Make Minute® Multi-Grain Medley a versatile recipe staple for your pantry.

Directions
1 -Do NOT use the bag for cooking. COMBINE water and contents of one bag in medium saucepan and stir. Add oil if desired. Or, if desired, to add more flavor, substitute broth, fruit or vegetable juice for water.
2 – BRING to a boil, reduce heat, cover and simmer 10 MINUTES or until water is absorbed.
3 – REMOVE from heat. Fluff with fork.
Serving Size 1/2 bag (43g)
Servings Per Container 8 [2 per bag]

Amount Per Serving
Calories 160 Calories From Fat 10
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1.5g 2
Saturated Fat 0g 0
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0
Sodium 15mg 1
Potassium 80mg 2
Total Carbohydrate 33g 11
Fiber 2g 8
Sugars 0g
Protein 4g

 
http://www.minuterice.com/en-us/products/241/Multi-GrainMedley.aspx

Fall Harvest: Jerusalem Artichokes/Sunchokes

October 6, 2013 at 9:16 AM | Posted in vegetables | 7 Comments
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Jerusalem artichokes/Sunchokes are brown nubs, that look a bit like small pieces of fresh ginger. Look for firm tubers with smooth, tan skins in fall and winter.

 

 

Stem with flowers

Stem with flowers

The Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus), also called sunroot, sunchoke, earth apple or topinambour, is a species of sunflower native to eastern North America, and found from eastern Canada and Maine west to North Dakota, and south to northern Florida and Texas. It is also cultivated widely across the temperate zone for its tuber, which is used as a root vegetable.

 

 

It is a herbaceous perennial plant growing to 1.5–3 meters (4 ft 10 in–9 ft 10 in) tall with opposite leaves on the upper part of the stem but alternate below. The leaves have a rough, hairy texture and the larger leaves on the lower stem are broad ovoid-acute and can be up to 30 centimeters (12 in) long, and the higher leaves smaller and narrower.
The flowers are yellow and produced in capitate flowerheads, which are 5–10 centimeters (2.0–3.9 in) in diameter, with 10–20 ray florets.
The tubers are elongated and uneven, typically 7.5–10 centimetres (3.0–3.9 in) long and 3–5 centimetres (1.2–2.0 in) thick, and vaguely resembling ginger root, with a crisp texture when raw. They vary in color from pale brown to white, red, or purple.
The artichoke contains about 10% protein, no oil, and a surprising lack of starch. However, it is rich in the carbohydrate inulin (76%), which is a polymer of the monosaccharide fructose. Tubers that are stored for any length of time will digest their inulin into its component fructose. Jerusalem artichokes have an underlying sweet taste because of the fructose, which is about one and a half times sweeter than sucrose.
Jerusalem artichokes have also been promoted as a healthy choice for diabetics. This is because fructose is better tolerated by people that are diabetic. It has also been reported as a folk remedy for diabetes. Temperature variances have been shown to affect the amount of inulin the Jerusalem artichoke can produce. When not in tropical regions, it has been shown to make less inulin than when it is in a warmer region.

 

Jerusalem artichokes

Jerusalem artichokes

 

Unlike most tubers, but in common with other members of the Asteraceae (including the artichoke), the tubers store the carbohydrate inulin (not to be confused with insulin) instead of starch. For this reason, Jerusalem artichoke tubers are an important source of inulin used as a dietary fiber in food manufacturing.
Crop yields are high, typically 16–20 tonnes/ha for tubers, and 18–28 tonnes/ha green weight for foliage. Jerusalem artichoke also has potential for production of ethanol fuel, using inulin-adapted strains of yeast for fermentation.
Jerusalem artichokes are easy to cultivate, which tempts gardeners to simply leave them completely alone to grow. However, the quality of the edible tubers degrades unless the plants are dug up and replanted in fertile soil. This can be a chore, as even a small piece of tuber will grow if left in the ground, making the hardy plant a potential weed. In fact, the plant can be pernicious. It can ruin gardens by smothering or overshadowing nearby plants and can overtake huge areas if left untamed. Commercial fields growing sunchoke which then change to other vegetables or crops often must be eradicated with glyphosate (sometimes twice, with attendant side effects of these potent toxins) to stop the spread of the sunchokes. Each sunchoke root can make an additional 75 to as many as 200 tubers by fall end.

The tubers are sometimes used as a substitute for potatoes: they have a similar consistency, and in their raw form have a similar texture, but a sweeter, nuttier flavor; raw and sliced thinly, they are fit for a salad. The carbohydrates give the tubers a tendency to become soft and mushy if boiled, but they retain their texture better when steamed. The inulin cannot be broken down by the human digestive system, which can cause flatulence and, in some cases, gastric pain. Gerard’s Herbal, printed in 1621, quotes the English planter John Goodyer on Jerusalem artichokes:
“which way soever they be dressed and eaten, they stir and cause a filthy loathsome stinking wind within the body, thereby causing the belly to be pained and tormented, and are a meat more fit for swine than men.”
Jerusalem artichokes have 650 mg potassium per 1 cup (150g) serving. They are also high in iron, and contain 10-12% of the US RDA of fiber, niacin, thiamine, phosphorus and copper.
Jerusalem artichokes can be used as animal feed, and, while they must be washed before being fed to most animals, pigs forage and safely eat them directly from the ground. The stalks and leaves can be harvested and used for silage, though cutting the tops greatly reduces the harvest of the roots.

 

 

 

13 Fruits and Vegetables to Buy in Fall

September 20, 2013 at 8:30 AM | Posted in fruits, vegetables | Leave a comment
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From Reader’s Digest a guide to fruits and vegetables that are at their peaks in fall. I left the link at the bottom of the post.

 
13 Fruits and Vegetables to Buy in Fall
Just because summer is over, doesn’t mean you can’t buy fresh produce. Here are 13 fruits and vegetables that are at their peaks in fall.
1. Apples
Visit your local farmers’ market or take a trip to the apple farm for the freshest apples. They’re perfect for snacking, baking, and more…
2. Oranges
From Florida to California, autumn is the best time to enjoy this citrus favorite….
3. Grapes
Fall’s harvest brings in a bounty of grapes in all varieties. Either as a snack or made into your favorite jam, now is the perfect time to bag a bunch….
*Click the link below to see the entire list along with recipes.

 
http://www.rd.com/slideshows/13-fruits-and-vegetables-to-buy-in-fall/#slideshow=slide1

Crappie Tonight!!

March 14, 2013 at 5:10 PM | Posted in Aunt Millie's, Crappie, fish, greenbeans, Idahoan Potato Products | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Fried Crappie w/ Loaded Baked Potato Casserole, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread

 

 

As Spring inches ever closer I always get my yearly Crappie fillets. My Cousins come home from their 3 month Winter retreat at Lake Crappie 005Okeechobee. Which also means I get a mess of fresh Crappies or Specks as they call them down in Florida. I could eat these every day and not get tired of them. I could not wait to open that first bag up and start frying! I seasoned them with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper. I then rolled each fillet in a Whole Wheat Flour and Italian Bread Crumb Mix. I lightly fried them in Canola Oil about 3 minutes per side. As the picture shows they came out golden brown and the taste unbelievable!

 

For side dishes to accompany the Crappie I prepared a Loaded Baked Potato Casserole, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread. I used Idahoan Loaded Baked Potato Casserole. The easy and delicious way to have Potato dishes. It’s 150 calories and 22 carbs per serving. The Green Beans were Del Monte Cut Green Beans, just heat in a sauce pan and serve. The Bread, Aunt Millie’s Whole Grain Light Bread. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate pudding.

 

crappie-cornbread-cakes-0011

 

Lake Okeechobee Crappie
Lake Okeechobee

Well if I’m posting about Lake Okeechobee you know it has to do with one of my favorite fish, the Crappie! My cousins dropped off my yearly supply of Lake Okeechobee Crappie! Here’s a little info on Lake Okeechobee.

Lake Okeechobee locally referred to as The Lake or The Big O, is the largest freshwater lake in the state of Florida. It is the seventh largest freshwater lake in the United States and the second largest freshwater lake contained entirely within the lower 48 states. Okeechobee covers 730 square miles (1,900 km2), approximately half the size of the state of Rhode Island, and is exceptionally shallow for a lake of its size, with an average depth of only 9 feet (3 m). The lake is divided between Glades, Okeechobee, Martin, Palm Beach, and Hendry counties. Maps of Florida[3] show that all five of these counties meet at one point near the center of the lake.

The most common fish in this lake are largemouth bass, crappie and bluegill. Pickerel have been less commonly caught.

Lake Okeechobee Crappie Fishing

The Florida Crappie fishing, speckled perch or speck’ as they are called throughout the State of Florida is the most sort after pan fish on Lake Okeechobee. Although the Florida crappie can be caught during the summer months, they really are at their best from late fall to early spring.

Go Lake Okeechobee freshwater fishing with your family and friends together for an affordable day of Florida crappie fishing on Lake Okeechobee. Lake Okeechobee comprises a 730-square-mile area and is the second-largest natural lake in the U.S., holding more than a trillion gallons of water.

Most fishing takes place along the southeastern, west and north portions of the lake within a mile of the shoreline. Look for hyacinths, hydrilla and other water plants where big bass ambush shiners, bluegills and other scaled groceries. They also pounce on frogs, crickets, worms, grasshoppers and pretty much any fish smaller than itself. Plastic imitations of those baits work well.

You know the deal black crappies speckled perch to most Floridians are about as smart as a dead bird, but fortunately they are a lot more abundant. Stick a minnow in their face, set the hook and start heating up the frying-pan as we say here on Okeechobee.

 

http://www.lakeokeechobeebassfishing.com/crappie-fishing/

 

 

 
Idahoan LOADED BAKED® HOMESTYLE CASSEROLE

There’s no better way to start a savory Loaded Baked® homestyle casserole than with world-famous Idaho® potatoes, which is why you’ll taste only 100% grown-in-Idaho potatoes in this rich, cheesy, bacony side. For family meals or for special occasions, this cheesy, delicious dish is sure to please.

Oven Directions
Best for Golden Browning

PREHEAT oven to 450°F. COMBINE potatoes and sauce mix in 1 1/2 quart baking dish.
STIR in 1 1/2 cups boiling water, 3/4 cup milk, and 1 1/2 Tbsp. margarine or butter with whisk.
BAKE uncovered for 25 minutes or until top is golden brown and potatoes are tender (sauce will thicken slightly when cooling).
Remove from oven and let stand a few minutes before serving.
BAKING NOTES: To prepare 2 casseroles at once, double all ingredients, increase baking dish size accordingly, and bake about 30 min. To bake potatoes and roast meat at the same time, bake at 375°F for about 45 min; 350°F for about 50 min; or 325°F for about 60 min.
Nutrition Facts
Amount Per Serving
Calories 100
Calories from fat 10
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 1g* 2%
Saturated Fat 0g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 640mg 27%
Total Carbohydrates 22g
http://www.idahoan.com/products/loaded-baked-homestyle-casserole/

Fish of the Week – Bluefish

March 5, 2013 at 10:51 AM | Posted in fish | Leave a comment
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The bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) is the only extant species of the Pomatomidae family. It is a marine pelagic fish found around the

Large bluefish, about 20 pounds

Large bluefish, about 20 pounds

world in temperate and sub-tropical waters, except for the Northern Pacific Ocean. Bluefish are known as tailor in Australia, shad on the east coast of South Africa, elf on the west coast, lüfer in Turkey, and similarly, луфарь/lufar in Russian. Other common names are blue, chopper, and anchoa. It is good eating and a popular gamefish.
The bluefish is a moderately proportioned fish, with a broad, forked tail. The spiny first dorsal fin is normally folded back in a groove, as are its pectoral fins. Coloration is a grayish blue-green dorsally, fading to white on the lower sides and belly. Its single row of teeth in each jaw are uniform in size, knife-edged and sharp. Bluefish commonly range in size from seven-inch (18-cm) “snappers” to much larger, sometimes weighing as much as 40 pounds (18 kg), though fish heavier than 20 pounds (9 kg) are exceptional.

 

Bluefish are widely distributed around the world in tropical and subtropical waters. They are found in pelagic waters on much of the continental shelves along eastern America (though not between south Florida and northern South America), Africa, the Mediterranean and Black Seas (and during migration in between), Southeast Asia and Australia. They are found in a variety of coastal habitats: above the continental shelf, in energetic waters near surf beaches or by rock headlands. They also enter estuaries and inhabit brackish waters. Periodically, they leave the coasts and migrate in schools through open waters.
Along the U.S. east coast, bluefish are found off Florida in the winter months. By April, they have disappeared, heading north. By June, they may be found off Massachusetts; in years of high abundance, stragglers may be found as far north as Nova Scotia. By October, they leave New England waters, heading south (whereas some Bluefish, perhaps less migratory, are present in the Gulf of Mexico throughout the year). In a similar pattern overall, the economically significant population that spawns in Europe’s Black Sea migrates South through Istanbul (Bosphorus, Sea of Marmara, Dardanelles, Aegean Sea) and on toward Turkey’s Mediterranean coast in the autumn for the cold season. Along the South African coast and environs, movement patterns are roughly in parallel.

 

Adult bluefish are typically between 20 and 60 cm long, with a maximum reported size of 120 cm and 14 kilograms. They reproduce during spring and summer, and can live for up to 9 years. Bluefish fry are zooplankton, and are largely at the mercy of currents. Spent bluefish have been found off east central Florida, migrating north. As with most marine fish, their spawning habits are not well known. In the western side of the North Atlantic, at least two populations occur, separated by Cape Hatteras in North Carolina. The Gulf Stream can carry fry spawned to the south of Cape Hatteras to the north, and eddies can spin off, carrying them into populations found off the coast of the mid-Atlantic, and the New England states.

 

Adult bluefish are strong and aggressive, and live in loose groups. They are fast swimmers which prey on schools of forage fish, and continue attacking them in feeding frenzies even after they appear to have eaten their fill. Depending on area and season, they favor menhaden and other sardine-like fish (Clupeidae), jacks (Scombridae), weakfish (Sciaenidae), grunts (Haemulidae), striped anchovies (Engraulidae), shrimp and squid. They are cannibalistic and can destroy their own young. Bluefish sometimes chase bait through the surf zone, attacking schools in very shallow water, churning the water like a washing machine. This behavior is sometimes referred to as a “bluefish blitz”.
In turn, bluefish are preyed upon by larger predators at all stages of their life cycle. As juveniles, they fall victim to a wide variety of oceanic predators, including striped bass, larger bluefish, fluke (summer flounder), weakfish, tuna, sharks, rays, and dolphins. As adults, bluefish are taken by tuna, sharks, billfish, seals, sea lions, dolphins, porpoises, and many other species.
Bluefish should be handled with caution due to their ability to snap at unwary hands. Fishermen have been severely bitten, and it can help to wear gloves. It a not good idea to wade or swim among feeding bluefish schools. In July 2006, a seven-year-old girl was attacked on a beach, near the Spanish town of Alicante, allegedly by a bluefish.

 

In the U.S., bluefish are landed primarily in recreational fisheries, but important commercial fisheries also exist in temperate and

Pan frying the fillets

Pan frying the fillets

subtropical waters. Bluefish population abundance is typically cyclical, with abundance varying widely over a span of ten years or more.

 

Bluefish is a highly sought-after sportfish (and restaurant fish in some places) that had been widely overfished across the world’s fisheries of this species. Restrictions set forth by management organizations have somewhat helped the species’ population stabilize. In the U.S., specifically along the seaboard of the middle Atlantic states, bluefish were at unhealthy levels in the late 1990s, but management resulted in this stocks being fully rebuilt by 2009 In other parts of the world, public awareness efforts like Bluefish festivals, combined with catch limits, may be having positive effects in reducing the stress on the regional stocks. Some of these efforts are regionally controversial.

Fish of the Week – Bass and (Large mouth and Small mouth Bass)

February 26, 2013 at 10:20 AM | Posted in cooking, fish | Leave a comment
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Bass is a name shared by many different species of popular gamefish. The term both encompasses freshwater and marine species. All

Largemouth bass with Sunfish

Largemouth bass with Sunfish

belong to the large order Perciformes, or perch-like fishes, and in fact the word bass comes from Middle English bars, meaning “perch.”

 

 

* The temperate basses, such as the striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and white bass (M. chrysops), belong to the family Moronidae.
* The black basses, such as the largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides), smallmouth bass (M. dolomieu), spotted bass (M. punctulatus), and Guadalupe bass (M. treculii), belong to the sunfish family, Centrarchidae.

 

 

Many species are also known as basses, including:
* The Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata, is a member of the temperate perch family, Percichthyidae.
* The black sea bass, Centropristis striata, is a member of the sea bass and sea grouper family, Serranidae.
* The giant sea bass Stereolepis gigas, also known as the black sea bass, is a member of the wreckfish family, Polyprionidae.
* The Chilean sea bass, Dissostichus eleginoides, more commonly known as the Patagonian toothfish, is a member of the cod icefish family, Nototheniidae.
* The European seabass, Dicentrarchus labrax, is a member of the temperate bass family, Moronidae.
* The “lanternbellies” or “temperate ocean-basses” – the family Acropomatidae.

 

 

Smallmouth bass
The smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) of the order Perciformes. It is the type species of its genus. One of the black basses, it is a popular game fish sought by anglers throughout the temperate zones of North America, and has been spread by stock to many cool-water tributaries and lakes in the United States and Canada. The smallmouth bass is native to the upper and middle Mississippi River basin, the Saint Lawrence River–Great Lakes system, and up into the Hudson Bay basin. Its common names include smallmouth, bronzeback, brown bass, brownie, smallie, bronze bass, and bareback bass.
The smallmouth bass is generally brown (seldom yellow) with red eyes, and dark brown vertical bands, rather than a horizontal band along the side. There are 13–15 soft rays in the dorsal fin. The upper jaw of smallmouth bass extends to the middle of the eye.
Males are generally smaller than females. The males tend to range around two pounds, while females can range from three to six pounds. Their average sizes can differ, depending on where they are found; those found in American waters tend to be larger due to the longer summers, which allow them to eat and grow for a longer period of time.
Their habitat plays a significant role in their color, weight, and shape. River water smallmouth that live among dark water tend to be rather torpedo-shaped and very dark brown to be more efficient for feeding. Lakeside smallmouth bass, however, that live in sandy areas, tend to be a light yellow-brown to adapt to the environment in a defensive state and are more oval-shaped

 

 

 

Largemouth bass

The largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) is a freshwater gamefish in the sunfish family, a species of black bass native to North

Largemouth bass, caught and released in Minnesota

Largemouth bass, caught and released in Minnesota

America. It is also known by a variety of regional names, such as the brown bass, widemouth bass, bigmouth, black bass, bucketmouth, Potter’s fish, Florida bass, Florida largemouth, green bass, green trout, gilsdorf bass, linesides, Oswego bass, southern largemouth and (paradoxically) northern largemouth. The largemouth bass is the state fish of Alabama (official freshwater fish), Georgia, Mississippi, Florida (state freshwater fish), and Tennessee (official sport fish).

 

The largemouth is an olive green fish, marked by a series of dark, sometimes black, blotches forming a jagged horizontal stripe along each flank. The upper jaw (maxilla) of a largemouth bass extends beyond the rear margin of the orbit. In comparison to age, a female bass is larger than a male. The largemouth is the largest of the black basses, reaching a maximum recorded overall length of 29.5 in (75 cm) and a maximum unofficial weight of 25 pounds 1 ounce (11.4 kg).[10] The fish lives 16 years on average.

Emeril’s Florida debuts Jan. 6 on Cooking Channel

January 5, 2013 at 12:33 PM | Posted in cooking | Leave a comment
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Emeril’s Florida debuts Jan. 6 on Cooking Channel with Orlando in focus
With two Orlando restaurants, chef Emeril Lagasse is no stranger to Central Florida. So it’s no surprise that he is intrigued with cookinguncovering authentic Florida fare. His new television series Emeril’s Florida premieres at 10:30 a.m. Sunday Jan. 6 on the Cooking Channel, an offshoot of the Food Network. The series covers the state’s regional cuisine from farms to restaurants giving viewers a fresh perspective of Florida food from the kitchen. But it is Central Florida that is in focus with the celebrity chef’s first stop at The Ravenous Pig in Winter Park. Lagasse and chef-owner James Petrakis prepare cobia, a favorite Florida catch . After that, cameras roll at Emeril’s Orlando with culinary cirector Bernard Carmouche. For that segment, black grouper with sofrito, rock shrimp and avocado toast is on the menu. The information-packed show showcases Vines Grille & Wine Bar, Orlando Brewing and ICEBAR before heading for dessert. Rosen Shingle Creek Resort’s award-winning executive pastry chef David Ramirez joins Lagasse to talk and sample artisan chocolates.

Lake Okeechobee Crappie

April 26, 2012 at 11:07 AM | Posted in fish, Food | Leave a comment
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Lake Okeechobee

Well if I’m posting about Lake Okeechobee you know it has to do with one of my favorite fish, the Crappie! My cousins dropped off my

A black crappie

yearly supply of Lake Okeechobee Crappie! More about that later. Here’s a little info on Lake Okeechobee.

Lake Okeechobee locally referred to as The Lake or The Big O, is the largest freshwater lake in the state of Florida. It is the seventh largest freshwater lake in the United States  and the second largest freshwater lake contained entirely within the lower 48 states. Okeechobee covers 730 square miles (1,900 km2), approximately half the size of the state of Rhode Island, and is exceptionally shallow for a lake of its size, with an average depth of only 9 feet (3 m). The lake is divided between Glades, Okeechobee, Martin, Palm Beach, and Hendry counties. Maps of Florida[3] show that all five of these counties meet at one point near the center of the lake.

The most common fish in this lake are largemouth bass, crappie and bluegill. Pickerel have been less commonly caught.

Lake Okeechobee Crappie Fishing

The Florida Crappie fishing, speckled perch or speck’ as they are called throughout the State of Florida is the most sort after pan fish on Lake Okeechobee. Although the Florida crappie can be caught during the summer months, they really are at their best from late fall to early spring.

Go Lake Okeechobee freshwater fishing with your family and friends together for an affordable day of Florida crappie fishing on Lake Okeechobee. Lake Okeechobee comprises a 730-square-mile area and is the second-largest natural lake in the U.S., holding more than a trillion gallons of water.

Most fishing takes place along the southeastern, west and north portions of the lake within a mile of the shoreline. Look for hyacinths, hydrilla and other water plants where big bass ambush shiners, bluegills and other scaled groceries. They also pounce on frogs, crickets, worms, grasshoppers and pretty much any fish smaller than itself. Plastic imitations of those baits work well.

You know the deal black crappies speckled perch to most Floridians are about as smart as a dead bird, but fortunately they are a lot more abundant. Stick a minnow in their face, set the hook and start heating up the frying-pan as we say here on Okeechobee.

http://www.lakeokeechobeebassfishing.com/crappie-fishing/

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