Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Sliced Carrots,

December 23, 2013 at 6:38 PM | Posted in carrots, chicken, greenbeans, Perdue Chicken Products, potatoes | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Sliced Carrots, and Baked Harvest Grain Bread

 

 

 

Mid 50’s the last couple of days and now the mid 30’s with a wind chill in the 20’s! Welcome to Ohio Winters! Dropped off a couple of gifts to my Cousin and after that sofa city, with the remote of course. For dinner tonight I prepared a (Perdue) Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Sliced Carrots, Baked Harvest Grain Bread.

 

Perdue Oven Ready Whole Chicken Breast 003

 

I used one my favorite ways to prepare Roasted Chicken, the Perdue Oven Ready Chickens! As it says “Oven Ready’, already seasoned, and little clean-up needed plus their always delicious. To prepare it just preheat the oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up. Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. If cooking from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF. Comes out piping hot and delicious! Plenty leftovers!

 

 

 

For one side dish I heated up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and Potatoes. I really like using the Del Monte Cut Green Beans and New Potatoes, contains 2 of my favorite vegetables (Green Beans and Potatoes). Then I also heated up some Sliced Carrots and we had slices of Klosterman Wheat Bread. I also opened up a couple of small cans of Mixed Fruit Cocktail for Mom and Dad. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Frozen Vanilla Bean Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

PERDUE® OVEN READY Whole Seasoned Roaster Bone-In Breast (3 lbs.)
Deliciously seasoned and juicy, whole bone-in chicken breast. Oven ready for convenience. Cooks perfectly in the bag for easy clean up.
INGREDIENTS
*Ingredients: Chicken, water, salt, potassium and sodium phosphates, brown sugar, dextrose, carrageenan, yeast extract, maltodextrin, natural flavor.

*Seasoning Ingredients: Dextrose, modified food starch, onion, maltodextrin, natural flavor, garlic, cottonseed oil, dried carrot, xanthan gum, dried parsley, calcium chloride, potassium chloride, carrageenan.
PRODUCT HANDLING
Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave. Cook thoroughly.
**If breast temperature is below 180ºF, return to oven and continue cooking, checking the temperature every 10 minutes until the temperature reaches 180ºF.

COOKING AND PREP
• Preheat oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up.
• Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. Note: Cooking bag will expand during cooking; allow enough room for the bag to expand without touching oven rack or walls.
• Cook from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Cook from Frozen: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oen and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes. Cut open cooking bag (use care to avoid hot steam and juices) and transfer breast to serving plate or cutting board. Remaining juices in bag can be used for a delicious seasoned gravy.

 

Nutrion Facts:

Serving Size 4oz (112g)
Servings Per Container about 11
Amount Per Serving (* % of Daily Value)
Calories 170
Calories from Fat 80
Total Fat 9g (14%)
Saturated Fat 2.5g (13%)
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 60mg (20%)
Sodium 360mg (15%)
Total Carbohydrate 0g (0%)
Dietary Fiber 0g (0%)
Sugars 0g
Protein 20g

 
http://www.perdue.com/products/details.asp?id=455&title=PERDUE%AE%20OVEN%20READY%20Whole%20Seasoned%20Roaster%20Bone-In%20Breast%20(3%20lbs.)

Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Sliced Carrots,

December 6, 2013 at 6:25 PM | Posted in carrots, chicken, greenbeans, Perdue Chicken Products, potatoes | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Sliced Carrots, and Baked Harvest Grain Bread

 

Snow 13 Baked Chicken Breast 003

 

They finally hit a weather forecast! They said “Snow” and it’s “Snow” we are getting! When it ends we’re predicted to have between 6-9 inches. Not bad for the first of the Season. Then Saturday it’s only going to be a high in the low 20’s so everything will freeze and then Sunday a whole lot of freezing rain heading our way. I’d rather have a foot of snow than freezing rain! We’ll just make the best of it! For dinner tonight I prepared a (Perdue) Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Sliced Carrots, Baked Harvest Grain Bread.

 

 

 

 

I love using these Perdue Oven Ready Chickens! As it says “Oven Ready’, already seasoned, and little clean-up needed plus their always delicious. To prepare it just preheat the oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up. Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. If cooking from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF. Comes out piping hot and delicious! Plenty leftovers!

 

Snow 13 Baked Chicken Breast 002

 

For one side dish I heated up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and Potatoes. Another of my new favorites, contains 2 of my favorite vegetables (Green Beans and Potatoes). Then I also heated up some Sliced Carrots and Baked a Loaf of Harvest Grain Bread. For dessert later tonight a Del Monte No Sugar Added Mango Chunk Cup.

 

 

 

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
PERDUE® OVEN READY Whole Seasoned Roaster Bone-In Breast (3 lbs.)

Perdue Whole Chicken Breast 002
Deliciously seasoned and juicy, whole bone-in chicken breast. Oven ready for convenience. Cooks perfectly in the bag for easy clean up.
INGREDIENTS
*Ingredients: Chicken, water, salt, potassium and sodium phosphates, brown sugar, dextrose, carrageenan, yeast extract, maltodextrin, natural flavor.

*Seasoning Ingredients: Dextrose, modified food starch, onion, maltodextrin, natural flavor, garlic, cottonseed oil, dried carrot, xanthan gum, dried parsley, calcium chloride, potassium chloride, carrageenan.
PRODUCT HANDLING
Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave. Cook thoroughly.
**If breast temperature is below 180ºF, return to oven and continue cooking, checking the temperature every 10 minutes until the temperature reaches 180ºF.

COOKING AND PREP
• Preheat oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up.
• Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. Note: Cooking bag will expand during cooking; allow enough room for the bag to expand without touching oven rack or walls.
• Cook from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Cook from Frozen: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oen and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes. Cut open cooking bag (use care to avoid hot steam and juices) and transfer breast to serving plate or cutting board. Remaining juices in bag can be used for a delicious seasoned gravy.

 

Nutrion Facts:

Serving Size 4oz (112g)
Servings Per Container about 11
Amount Per Serving (* % of Daily Value)
Calories 170
Calories from Fat 80
Total Fat 9g (14%)
Saturated Fat 2.5g (13%)
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 60mg (20%)
Sodium 360mg (15%)
Total Carbohydrate 0g (0%)
Dietary Fiber 0g (0%)
Sugars 0g
Protein 20g

 

 
http://www.perdue.com/products/details.asp?id=455&title=PERDUE%AE%20OVEN%20READY%20Whole%20Seasoned%20Roaster%20Bone-In%20Breast%20(3%20lbs.)

 

 

 

Snow 13 Baked Chicken Breast 001

Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Whole Kernel Corn,..

November 23, 2013 at 6:24 PM | Posted in chicken, greenbeans, Perdue Chicken Products, potatoes | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Whole Kernel Corn, and Wheat Bread

 

 

 

It’s been a very long 24 hours! It’s been bad enough dealing with a nagging sinus infection but last night around 8:00 or so I was also had to deal with those Phantom Pains again, and they were painful ones. I went to bed around 11:30 and got about a 1/2 hour of sleep between then and 6:00 am. I finally was able to fall asleep and slept to about 8:30 this morning. They continued today to the afternoon before finally stopping. I hope one day they have a cure or something to relieve the pain of Phantom Pains. Finally got the new Microwave installed and running today, one good thing! Just a word of warning for anyone that shops at Kroger. Here the past couple of months I’ve found over charges of over $40 or more on items! The latest is what I prepared for dinner tonight, Perdue Oven Ready Roaster Whole Bone-In Chicken Breast. Got home the other day and checked my Kroger receipt and seen I was charged $11.99 for it and they had it on sale $7.99. Once again they blame it on their scanners. So anyway check your receipts closely when shopping Kroger! For dinner tonight I prepared a Baked Bone-In Whole Chicken Breast w/ Cut Green Beans and Potatoes, Whole Kernel Corn, and sliced Wheat Bread.

 

Perdue Whole Chicken Breast 004
I love using these Perdue Oven Ready Chickens! As it says “Oven Ready’, already seasoned, and little clean-up needed plus their always delicious. To prepare it just preheat the oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up. Cut one small 1” slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. If cooking from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF. Comes out piping hot and delicious! Plenty leftover for my lunch tomorrow.

 

 
For one side dish I heated up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and Potatoes. Another of my new favorites, contains 2 of my favorite vegetables (Green Beans and Potatoes). Then I heated up another Del Monte Product, Whole Kernel Corn. Then I also had a slice of Klosterman Wheat Bread. For dessert later tonight a Del Monte No Sugar Added Peach Chunk Cup.

 

 

 

 

PERDUE® OVEN READY Whole Seasoned Roaster Bone-In Breast (3 lbs.)

Perdue Whole Chicken Breast 002
Deliciously seasoned and juicy, whole bone-in chicken breast. Oven ready for convenience. Cooks perfectly in the bag for easy clean up.
INGREDIENTS
*Ingredients: Chicken, water, salt, potassium and sodium phosphates, brown sugar, dextrose, carrageenan, yeast extract, maltodextrin, natural flavor.

*Seasoning Ingredients: Dextrose, modified food starch, onion, maltodextrin, natural flavor, garlic, cottonseed oil, dried carrot, xanthan gum, dried parsley, calcium chloride, potassium chloride, carrageenan.
PRODUCT HANDLING
Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave. Cook thoroughly.
**If breast temperature is below 180ºF, return to oven and continue cooking, checking the temperature every 10 minutes until the temperature reaches 180ºF.

COOKING AND PREP
• Preheat oven to 400ºF. Cut open outer bag and remove Oven Ready Roaster Bone-In Breast, sealed in a cooking bag. Place in a shallow roasting pan, seasoned side up.
• Cut one small 1″ slit in cooking bag over the breast to vent during cooking. Note: Cooking bag will expand during cooking; allow enough room for the bag to expand without touching oven rack or walls.
• Cook from Fresh: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oven and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes, until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Cook from Frozen: Place pan with breast (still in cooking bag) on lower shelf of oen and roast for approximately 80-90 minutes until internal temperature of the breast reaches 180ºF.**
• Remove from oven and let stand for 10 minutes. Cut open cooking bag (use care to avoid hot steam and juices) and transfer breast to serving plate or cutting board. Remaining juices in bag can be used for a delicious seasoned gravy.

 

Nutrion Facts:

Serving Size 4oz (112g)
Servings Per Container about 11
Amount Per Serving (* % of Daily Value)
Calories 170
Calories from Fat 80
Total Fat 9g (14%)
Saturated Fat 2.5g (13%)
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 60mg (20%)
Sodium 360mg (15%)
Total Carbohydrate 0g (0%)
Dietary Fiber 0g (0%)
Sugars 0g
Protein 20g

 
http://www.perdue.com/products/details.asp?id=455&title=PERDUE%AE%20OVEN%20READY%20Whole%20Seasoned%20Roaster%20Bone-In%20Breast%20(3%20lbs.)

Fried Seasoned Haddock w/ Parmesan Risotto and Cut Green Beans

August 31, 2013 at 5:23 PM | Posted in fish, greenbeans, risotto, Sea Salt, seafood | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Fried Seasoned Haddock w/ Parmesan Risotto and Cut Green BeansHaddock rissoto 006

 

 

Spent the afternoon watching College Football along with some of my Ohio State and Univ. of Cincinnati Friends. I’m glad Football is back, and the NFL starts Thursday Night! For dinner i prepared what’s becoming my favorite Fish, Haddock. I prepared a Fried Seasoned Haddock w/ Parmesan Risotto and Cut Green Beans.

 

 

The Haddock just frys up so good with a great taste. To prepare it I had a big fillet that I rinsed in cold water and patted dry with a paper towel. I then seasoned it with just a bit of Sea Salt and put the pieces in a Hefty Zip Plastic Bag where I then added Zatarain’s Lemon Pepper Breading Mix. Shook until all the pieces were well coated. I pan fried them in Canola Oil, frying them about 3 minutes per side until golden brown. Delicious! Anymore I use some type of Zatarain’s product on about 1/2 my meals I prepare throughout the week.

 

Haddock rissoto 001

 

One side dish I prepared was a box of Lundberg Creamy Parmesan Risotto. Quick, easy, and delicious Risotto dish. Ready in about 25 – 30 mionutes. I sprinkled some fresh grated Parmesan Cheese on it when it was finished. I also heated up a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans. For dessert later a Del Monte No Sugar Added Peach Chunks Cup.

 

 

 

 

Lundberg Creamy Parmesan RisottoLundberg Risotto2
Creamy Parmesan Risotto

Enjoy the delectable flavor of rich, aged Parmesan cheese in this elegant Italian-style risotto. We created this delicious gourmet side dish by blending quality ingredients like Parmesan cheese, onion, garlic, and spices with our creamy Arborio rice. You’ll love how the individual kernels plump, creating a rich, creamy sauce while the rice grains remain separate and al dente. Preparing this tasty risotto takes about 20 minutes and requires minimal stirring. It’s an easy, convenient way to add gourmet flair to any meal.

Cooking Instructions

In a heavy 2 qt. saucepan, sauté rice in ½ Tbsp. olive oil over medium heat for 2 minutes. Add 2½ cups water and contents of seasoning pouch. Stir well and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer, cook uncovered for 20 minutes stirring occasionally until rice is tender. Garnish with grated Parmesan cheese is desired. Serve piping hot.
Ingredients

Eco-Farmed Arborio Rice, Parmesan and Cheddar Cheese Blend (Parmesan Cheese, Cheddar Cheese {Milk, Cheese Culture, Salt, Enzymes}), Salt, Whey, Buttermilk Powder, Dried Cane Syrup, Natural Flavors (Cheese, Dairy), Garlic Powder, Onion Powder, Sodium Phosphate, Maltodextrin, Dried Parsley, Yeast Extract, Butter (Cream, Salt), Rice Flour, Autolyzed Yeast Extract, Expeller-Pressed Safflower or Sunflower Oil, Pepper, Lactic Acid, Nonfat Milk, Enzyme-Modified Cheddar Cheese, Turmeric. Contains Milk.

 
http://www.lundberg.com/products/risottos/Creamy_Parmesan_Risotto.aspx

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 30, 2013 at 8:33 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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The Best Ways to Freeze Food Tips:

 

* On the other hand, use more onion than you would otherwise, because freezing tends to cause onion to lose its flavor. Herbs and salt also tend to diminish in flavor, so it’s best to add them after freezing, when you’re reheating the dish.

 

 

* Avoid freezing sauces. Egg-based sauces and those high in fat tend to separate when reheated, and cheese – or milk based sauces are prone to curdling. Don’t try to freeze mayonnaise, salad dressing, or jam. Most gravies will thicken considerably when frozen, but they can be thinned when reheated.

 

 

* Artificial sweeteners do not freeze well, so don’t substitute them for sugar.

 

 

* Don’t freeze any bakery item with a cream filling because it become soggy. Custard and meringue pies, don’t freeze well. The custard tends to separate and the meringue becomes tough.

 

 

* Cool already-cooked foods in the refrigerator before freezing. Cooling them quickly prevents bacterial growth.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 20, 2013 at 8:31 AM | Posted in grilling, Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Though they may be more work than a gas grill, charcoal grills impart an amazing smoky flavor to meats and veggies. Here are a few tips to get the most out of your charcoal grill.

 

* To add flavor to barbecued foods, place dried herbs on the hot coals. Some of our favorites are savory, rosemary, and basil.

 

* If the coals become too hot or flare up, squirt them with water from a mister or bulb baster.

 

* Store charcoal briquettes in airtight plastic bags – they absorb moisture very easily and won’t be as easy to light if exposed to air.

Grilled BBQ Pork Chop w/ Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread

April 25, 2013 at 5:53 PM | Posted in grilling, Idahoan Potato Products, JB's Fatboy Sauces and Rub, pork chops | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Grilled BBQ Pork Chop w/ Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread

 
Well my Dad was moved this afternoon from the hospital to a rehab center, at least 2 weeks or more till he regains his strength. The weather, it’s a sunny but cool day again. Where is our warm Spring weather? I found time this afternoon to work on the gas grill. Cleaned the burner and gas line, and got it going again! I think it’s about worn out, hopefully I’ll get another Summer out of it. For dinner tonight; a Grilled BBQ Pork Chop w/ Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread. My first grilled Chop of the Spring!

 

I used a Costco Center Cut Pork Loin Chop. I love Costco’s Meats. If you’ve never tried them you should. After warming up the grill I Grilled Pork Chop 008_cropseasoned my Chop with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. It was a fairly thick cut Chop so I had to keep it on the grill a little longer than normal. When the Chop was done I immediately brushed both sides with my favorite BBQ Sauce, JB ‘s Fatboy Haugwaush Sauce. I just love all the JB ‘s Fatboy BBQ Sauces and Rubs but the Haugwaush Sauce is my favorite! It’s a flavorful thick Sauce with a perfect blend of spices and ingredients. Another must try if you haven’t. The Chop was juicy and full of flavor! Love that Grill!

 

For sides I warmed up some Idahoan Homestyle Mashed Potatoes. I used the single serve microwavable one. I also warmed a single serve can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and had Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread topped with a bit of I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter. For dessert later a Healthy Life Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 
JB ‘s Fatboy Haugwaush Sauce

Product Description
Be happier than a pig in sauce after adding Haugwaush to any meat product. Serve direct as a condiment or coat on grilled meats the last few minutes of cooking time. Sauce will caramelize on meat when heated through.
Warning: Consumer should be aware that frequent use of this sauce may result in the temptation to ‘pig out’ at the dinner table.
Shake well before using. Refrigerate after opening. Made in the USA.
Ingredients: Red ripe tomatoes, brown sugar, mustard, natural smoke flavor, filtered water, vinegar, honey, kosher salt, onion, garlic, natural flavor, turmeric, tamarind, and spices.

Nutritional Facts
Serving Size: 2 Tbsp (35 g) Servings: 12 Size: 12 fl. oz. (354.9 ml) Calories: 80 Total Fat: 0 g (0% DV) Sodium: 230 mg (9% DV) Total Carbohydrate: 20 g (7% DV) Sugars: 19 g Protein: 0 g Vitamin A: 6% DV Vitamin C: 4% DV Percent Daily Values (DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

 

 

http://jbsfatboy.com/

 

 

Buttery Homestyle Flavored Mashed Potatoes Cup

Idahoan’s popular Buttery Homestyle mashed potatoes now available in a convenient, portable, easy-to-prepare cup. You’ll find many new uses for Buttery Homestyle mashed potatoes in a cup, from snacks to work-time lunch sides. The flavor of Idahoan’s best, now in an ultra convenient pack.
Microwave Directions
CAUTION: KEEP KIDS SAFE! Cup and potatoes will be VERY HOT!

Remove lid completely.
Add cold water to fill-line in cup. Stir thoroughly to moisten all potatoes.
Microwave uncovered on HIGH for 1 1/2 minutes. CAUTION: Cup and contents will be very hot!
Stir well and let stand for 1 minute. Enjoy.
INGREDIENTS: IDAHO® POTATOES, PARTIALLY HYDROGENATED OIL (CONTAINS ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING: SOYBEAN, COTTONSEED, SUNFLOWER), CORN SYRUP SOLIDS, SALT, MALTODEXTRIN, COCONUT OIL, NONFAT DRY MILK, SUGAR, WHEY POWDER, SODIUM CASEINATE, BUTTER POWDER [BUTTER (SWEET CREAM, SALT, ANNATTO COLOR), NONFAT MILK SOLIDS, SODIUM CASEINATE AND DISODIUM PHOSPHATE], MONO AND DIGLYCERIDES, CALCIUM STEAROYL LACTYLATE, NATURAL AND ARTIFICIAL FLAVORS, SPICE, SODIUM ACID PYROPHOSPHATE, SODIUM BISULFITE, DIPOTASSIUM PHOSPHATE, LECITHIN, ARTIFICIAL COLOR, CITRIC ACID, MIXED TOCOPHEROLS (VITAMIN E) AND LESS THAN 2% SILICON DIOXIDE ADDED AS AN ANTI-CAKING AGENT.
Nutrition Facts
Amount Per Serving
Calories 110
Calories from fat 25
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 3g* 5%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 450mg 19%
Total Carbohydrates 20g 7%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Sugars 2g
Protein 2g
http://idahoan.com/products/buttery-homestyle-flavored-mashed-potatoes-cup/

 

Fried Lake Perch w/ Rice A Roni and Sliced Carrots

April 12, 2013 at 5:17 PM | Posted in carrots, fish, rice | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Fried Lake Perch w/ Rice A Roni and Sliced Carrots

 

 

Lake Perch Rice A Roni 003
Well were back to a cloudy and chilly day outside again. They say just for a day or so I just hope their right ! Busy all day just doing little things in the house and running errands. I had no clue on what to have for dinner right up to the time it was time to prepare it. I ended up preparing a Fried Lake Perch w/ Rice A Roni and Sliced Carrots.

 

The Lake Perch was from the Kroger Seafood Department that I had purchased yesterday. I seasoned them with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper and rolled them in Progresso Italian Style Bread Crumbs. I then skillet fried them in Canola Oil to a golden brown. Perch is just good eating! It’s good baked but in my opinion you just can’t beat golden brown fried fish.

 

For side dishes to go with the Perch I had Rice A Roni (Chicken Flavored), a small can of Sliced Carrots, and Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. The Rice A Roni was in a microwavable cup. Just heat for 3 1/2 minutes and it’s ready. For dessert/snack later tonight, while watching one of my favorite shows “Grimm“, a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Jolly Time Pop Corn.

 

 

 

RICE A RONIRice A Roni Chicken

A family classic! Our Rice-A-Roni® Chicken flavor blends rice and vermicelli with chicken broth, onions, parsley, garlic and other natural flavors to create a delicious side dish that will delight your whole family. It’s the perfect complement to your favorite chicken recipes.

One of America’s Favorites – Lemonade

March 11, 2013 at 8:50 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | 9 Comments
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Lemonade is a lemon-flavored drink. In different parts of the world, the name has different meanings. In North America, lemonade is Lemonadeusually made from lemon juice, water, and sugar and is often home-made. In the United Kingdom and some other English-speaking countries, lemonade is a commercially-produced, lemon-flavored, carbonated, sweetened soft drink (known as lemon-lime in North America). Although lemonade is usually non-alcoholic, in recent years alcoholic versions of lemonade (called “hard lemonade”) have become popular in various countries.

In the USA and Canada, lemonade is an uncarbonated drink made from squeezed lemon juice, water, and sugar. Slices of lemon are sometimes added to a pitcher as a garnish and further source of flavoring.
It can be made fresh from fruit, reconstituted from frozen juice, dry powder, or liquid concentrate, and colored in a variety of shades. Artificially sweetened and artificially flavored versions are also popular.
Variations on this form of lemonade can be found in many countries. In India and Pakistan, where it is commonly known as limbu paani or nimbu paani, lemonade may also contain salt and/or ginger juice. Shikanjvi is a traditional lemonade from the India-Pakistan region and can also be flavored with saffron, garlic and cumin

Pink lemonade may be colored with the juices of raspberries, cherries, red grapefruit, grapes, cranberries, strawberries, grenadine, orPink lemonade artificial food dye. The pink-fleshed, ornamental Eureka lemon is commonly used as its juice is clear though it is sometimes thought to be too sour to drink.
The New York Times credited Henry E. “Sanchez” Allott as the inventor of pink lemonade in his obituary, saying he had dropped in red cinnamon candies by mistake. Another theory, recorded by historian Joe Nickell in his book Secrets of the Sideshows, is that Pete Conklin first invented the drink in 1857 when he used water dyed pink from a horse rider’s red tights to make his lemonade.

In the United Kingdom, lemonade most often refers to a clear, carbonated, sweetened, lemon-flavored soft drink. In North America, this is known as lemon-lime. The suffix ‘-ade’ in British English is used for several carbonated sweet soft drinks, such as limeade, orangeade or cherryade.
UK-style lemonade and beer are mixed to make a shandy. Lemonade is also an important ingredient in the Pimm’s Cup cocktail, and is a popular drink mixer.
In the UK and other places the American-style drink is often called “traditional lemonade” or “homemade lemonade”. Carbonated versions of this are also sold commercially as “cloudy” or “traditional” lemonade. There are also similar uncarbonated products, lemon squash and lemon barley water, both of which are usually sold as a syrup which is diluted to taste.
Lemonade in Ireland comes in three varieties, known as red, brown and white. Red lemonade is one of the most popular mixers used with spirits in Ireland, particularly in whiskey. Major brands of red lemonade include TK (formerly Taylor Keith), Country Spring, Finches and Nash’s. Other brands include Maine, Yacht and C&C (Cantrell & Cochrane). The most common brands of brown lemonade in Northern Ireland are Cantrell & Cochrane (C&C) and Maine. C&C label this as “Witches Brew” in the weeks around Hallowe’en.[citation needed] There was an urban myth that European Union authorities had banned red lemonade but the truth was simply that they had banned a cancer-causing dye.

In Australia and New Zealand, lemonade usually refers to the clear, carbonated soft drink that other countries identify as having a lemon flavor such as Sprite. This standard, clear lemonade can be referred to as ‘plain’ lemonade and other colored (and flavored) soft drinks are sometimes referred to by their color such as “red lemonade” or “green lemonade”.
In France, “citronade” is used to refer to American-style lemonade. “Limonade” refers to carbonated, lemon-flavoured, clear soft drinks. Sprite and 7 up are sometimes also called limonade. Pink lemonade made with limonade is called “diabolo”. Limonade and grenadine is called a “diabolo-grenadine” and limonade with peppermint syrup a “diabolo-menthe”. Limonade is also widely used to make beer cocktails such as “panaché” (half beer, half limonade) or “monaco” (panaché with added grenadine syrup).
Limonana, a type of lemonade made from freshly-squeezed lemon juice and mint leaves, is a widely popular summer drink in Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. Limonana was created in the early 1990s in Israel after an advertising agency promoted the then-fictitious product to prove the efficacy of advertising on public buses. The campaign generated so much consumer demand that the drink began to be produced for real by restaurateurs and manufacturers, and became very popular.

One of America’s Favorite – Ice Cream

April 10, 2012 at 10:17 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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Ice cream (formerly and properly ice-cream, derived from earlier iced cream or cream ice) is a frozen dessert usually

made from dairy

products, such as milk and cream, and often combined with fruits or other ingredients

and flavours. Most varieties contain sugar, although some are made with other sweeteners. In some cases, artificial flavorings and colorings are used in addition to, or instead of, the natural ingredients. The mixture of chosen ingredients is stirred slowly while cooling, in order to incorporate air and to prevent large ice crystals from forming. The result is a smoothly textured semi-solid foam that is malleable and can be scooped.

The meaning of the term “ice cream” varies from one country to another. Terms such as “frozen custard”, “frozen yogurt”, “sorbet”, “gelato” and others are used to distinguish different varieties and styles. In some countries, such as the USA, the term “ice cream” applies only to a specific variety, and most governments regulate the commercial use of the various terms according to the relative quantities of the main ingredients. In other countries, such as Italy and Argentina, one word is used for all variants. Analogues made from dairy alternatives, such as goat’s or sheep’s milk, or milk substitutes, are available for those who are lactose intolerant, allergic to dairy protein, and/or vegan. The most popular flavors of ice cream are vanilla and chocolate.

In the Persian Empire, people would pour grape-juice concentrate over snow, in a bowl, and eat this as a treat, especially when the weather was hot. Snow would either be saved in the cool-keeping underground chambers known as “yakhchal”, or taken from snowfall that remained at the top of mountains by the summer capital – Hagmatana, Ecbatana or Hamedan of today. In 400 BC, the Persians went further and invented a special chilled food, made of rose water and vermicelli, which was served to royalty during summers. The ice was mixed with saffron, fruits, and various other flavours.

Ancient civilizations have served ice for cold foods for thousands of years. The BBC reports that a frozen mixture of milk and rice was used in China around 200 BC. The Roman Emperor Nero (37–68) had ice brought from the mountains and combined it with fruit toppings. These were some early chilled delicacies.

Arabs were perhaps the first to use milk as a major ingredient in the production of ice cream. They sweetened it with sugar rather than fruit juices, and perfected means of commercial production. As early as the 10th century, ice cream was widespread among many of the Arab world‘s major cities, such as Baghdad, Damascus, and Cairo. It was produced from milk or cream, often with some yoghurt, and was flavoured with rosewater, dried fruits and nuts. It is believed that the recipe was based on older Ancient Arabian recipes, which were, it is presumed, the first and precursors to Persian faloodeh.

Maguelonne Toussaint-Samatasserts, in her History of Food, that “the Chinese may be credited with inventing a device to make

Japanese green tea ice cream with anko sauce

sorbets and ice cream. They poured a mixture of snow and saltpetre over the exteriors of containers filled with syrup, for, in the same way as salt raises the boiling-point of water, it lowers the freezing-point to below zero.”

In the sixteenth century, the Mughal emperors used relays of horsemen to bring ice from the Hindu Kush to Delhi, where it was used in fruit sorbets.

When Italian duchess Catherine de’ Medici married the duc d’Orléans in 1533, she is said to have brought with her to France some Italian chefs who had recipes for flavored ices or sorbets. One hundred years later, Charles I of England was, it was reported, so impressed by the “frozen snow” that he offered his own ice cream maker a lifetime pension in return for keeping the formula secret, so that ice cream could be a royal prerogative. There is no historical evidence to support these legends, which first appeared during the 19th century.

The first recipe in French for flavored ices appears in 1674, in Nicholas Lemery’s Recueil de curiositéz rares et nouvelles de plus admirables effets de la nature. Recipes for sorbetti saw publication in the 1694 edition of Antonio Latini‘s Lo Scalco alla Moderna (The Modern Steward). Recipes for flavoured ices begin to appear in François Massialot‘s Nouvelle Instruction pour les Confitures, les Liqueurs, et les Fruits, starting with the 1692 edition. Massialot’s recipes result in a coarse, pebbly texture. Latini claims that the results of his recipes should have the fine consistency of sugar and snow.

Ice cream recipes first appeared in 18th-century England and America. The recipe for ice cream was published in Mrs. Mary Eales’s Receipts in London in 1718.

To ice cream.

Take Tin Ice-Pots, fill them with any Sort of Cream you like, either plain or sweeten’d, or Fruit in it; shut your Pots very close; to six Pots you must allow eighteen or twenty Pound of Ice, breaking the Ice very small; there will be some great Pieces, which lay at the Bottom and Top: You must have a Pail, and lay some Straw at the Bottom; then lay in your Ice, and put in amongst it a Pound of Bay-Salt; set in your Pots of Cream, and 93 lay Ice and Salt between every Pot, that they may not touch; but the Ice must lie round them on every Side; lay a good deal of Ice on the Top, cover the Pail with Straw, set it in a Cellar where no Sun or Light comes, it will be froze in four Hours, but it may stand longer; then take it out just as you use it; hold it in your Hand and it will slip out. When you wou’d freeze any Sort of Fruit, either Cherries, Raspberries, Currants, or Strawberries, fill your Tin-Pots with the Fruit, but as hollow as you can; put to them Lemonade, made with Spring-Water and Lemmon-Juice sweeten’d; put enough in the Pots to make the Fruit hang together, and put them in Ice as you do Cream.

The earliest reference to ice cream given by the Oxford English Dictionary is from 1744, reprinted in a magazine in 1877. 1744 in Pennsylvania Mag. Hist. & Biogr. (1877) I. 126 Among the rarities..was some fine ice cream, which, with the strawberries and milk, eat most deliciously.

The 1751 edition of The Art of Cookery made Plain and Easy by Hannah Glasse features a recipe for ice cream. OED gives her recipe: H. GLASSE Art of Cookery (ed. 4) 333 (heading) To make Ice Cream..set it [sc. the cream] into the larger Bason. Fill it with Ice, and a Handful of Salt.

The year 1768 saw the publication of L’Art de Bien Faire les Glaces d’Office by M. Emy, a cookbook devoted entirely to recipes for flavoured ices and ice cream.

Ice cream was introduced to the United States by Quaker colonists who brought their ice cream recipes with them. Confectioners sold ice cream at their shops in New York and other cities during the colonial era. Ben Franklin, George Washington, and Thomas Jefferson were known to have regularly eaten and served ice cream. First Lady Dolley Madison is also closely associated with the early history of ice cream in the United States. One respected history of ice cream states that, as the wife of U.S. President James Madison, she served ice cream at her husband’s Inaugural Ball in 1813.

Around 1832, Augustus Jackson, an African American confectioner, not only created multiple ice cream recipes but also invented a superior technique to manufacture ice cream.

In 1843, Nancy Johnson of Philadelphia was issued the first U.S. patent for a small-scale handcranked ice cream freezer. The invention of the ice cream soda gave Americans a new treat, adding to ice cream’s popularity. The invention of this cold treat is attributed to Robert Green in 1874, although there is no conclusive evidence to prove his claim.

The ice cream sundae originated in the late 19th century. Several men claimed to have created the first sundae, but there is no

Ice cream sundaes with fruit, nuts, and a wafer

conclusive evidence to back up any of their stories. Some sources say that the sundae was invented to circumvent blue laws, which forbade serving sodas on Sunday. Towns claiming to be the birthplace of the sundae include Buffalo, New York; Two Rivers, Wisconsin; Ithaca, New York; and Evanston, Illinois. Both the ice cream cone and banana split became popular in the early 20th century. Several food vendors claimed to have invented the ice cream cone at the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis, MO. Europeans were eating cones long before 1904.

In the UK, ice cream remained an expensive and rare treat, until large quantities of ice began to be imported from Norway and the US in the mid-Victorian era. A Swiss-Italian businessman, Carlo Gatti, opened the first ice cream stall outside Charing Cross station in 1851, selling scoops of ice cream in shells for one penny.

The history of ice cream in the 20th century is one of great change and increases in availability and popularity. In the United States in the early 20th century, the ice cream soda was a popular treat at the soda shop, the soda fountain, and the ice cream parlor. During American Prohibition, the soda fountain to some extent replaced the outlawed alcohol establishments such as bars and saloons.

Ice cream became popular throughout the world in the second half of the 20th century after cheap refrigeration became common. There was an explosion of ice cream stores and of flavors and types. Vendors often competed on the basis of variety. Howard Johnson’s restaurants advertised “a world of 28 flavors.” Baskin-Robbins made its 31 flavors (“one for every day of the month”) the cornerstone of its marketing strategy. The company now boasts that it has developed over 1000 varieties.

One important development in the 20th century was the introduction of soft ice cream. A chemical research team in Britain (of which a young Margaret Thatcher was a member) discovered a method of doubling the amount of air in ice cream, which allowed manufacturers to use less of the actual ingredients, thereby reducing costs. It made possible the soft ice cream machine in which a cone is filled beneath a spigot on order. In the United States, Dairy Queen, Carvel, and Tastee-Freez pioneered in establishing chains of soft-serve ice cream outlets.

Technological innovations such as these have introduced various food additives into ice cream, the notable one being the stabilizing agent gluten, to which some people have an intolerance. Recent awareness of this issue has prompted a number of manufacturers to start producing gluten-free ice cream.

The 1980s saw a return of the older, thicker ice creams being sold as “premium” and “superpremium” varieties under brands such as Ben & Jerry’s and Häagen-Dazs.

Before the development of modern refrigeration, ice cream was a luxury reserved for special occasions. Making it was quite laborious; ice was cut from lakes and ponds during the winter and stored in holes in the ground, or in wood-frame or brick ice houses, insulated by straw. Many farmers and plantation owners, including U.S. Presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, cut and stored ice in the winter for use in the summer. Frederic Tudor of Boston turned ice harvesting and shipping into a big business, cutting ice in New England and shipping it around the world.

Ice cream was made by hand in a large bowl placed inside a tub filled with ice and salt. This was called the pot-freezer method. French confectioners refined the pot-freezer method, making ice cream in a sorbetière (a covered pail with a handle attached to the lid). In the pot-freezer method, the temperature of the ingredients is reduced by the mixture of crushed ice and salt. The salt water is cooled by the ice, and the action of the salt on the ice causes it to (partially) melt, absorbing latent heat and bringing the mixture below the freezing point of pure water. The immersed container can also make better thermal contact with the salty water and ice mixture than it could with ice alone.

The hand-cranked churn, which also uses ice and salt for cooling, replaced the pot-freezer method. The exact origin of the hand-cranked freezer is unknown, but the first U.S. patent for one was #3254 issued to Nancy Johnson on September 9, 1843. The hand-cranked churn produced smoother ice cream than the pot freezer and did it quicker. Many inventors patented improvements on Johnson’s design.

In Europe and early America, ice cream was made and sold by small businesses, mostly confectioners and caterers. Jacob Fussell of Baltimore, Maryland was the first to manufacture ice cream on a large scale. Fussell bought fresh dairy products from farmers in York County, Pennsylvania, and sold them in Baltimore. An unstable demand for his dairy products often left him with a surplus of cream, which he made into ice cream. He built his first ice cream factory in Seven Valleys, Pennsylvania, in 1851. Two years later, he moved his factory to Baltimore. Later, he opened factories in several other cities and taught the business to others, who operated their own plants. Mass production reduced the cost of ice cream and added to its popularity.

The development of industrial refrigeration by German engineer Carl von Linde during the 1870s eliminated the need to cut and store natural ice, and, when the continuous-process freezer was perfected in 1926, commercial mass production of ice cream and the birth of the modern ice cream industry was underway.

The most common method for producing ice cream at home is to use an ice cream maker, in modern times, in general, an electrical device that churns the ice cream mixture while cooled inside a household freezer, or using a solution of pre-frozen salt and water, which gradually melts while the ice cream freezes. Some more expensive models have an inbuilt freezing element. A newer method of making home-made ice cream is to add liquid nitrogen to the mixture while stirring it using a spoon or spatula. Some ice cream recipes call for making a custard, folding in whipped cream, and immediately freezing the mixture.

Ice cream can be mass-produced and thus is widely available in developed parts of the world. Ice cream can be purchased in large cartons (vats and squrounds) from supermarkets and grocery stores, in smaller quantities from ice cream shops, convenience stores, and milk bars, and in individual servings from small carts or vans at public events. In Turkey and Australia, ice cream is sometimes sold to beach-goers from small powerboats equipped with chest freezers. Some ice cream distributors sell ice cream products from traveling refrigerated vans or carts (commonly referred to in the US as “ice cream trucks”), sometimes equipped with speakers playing children’s music. Ice cream vans in the United Kingdom make a music box noise rather than actual music.

In the USA, ice cream may have the following composition:

*greater than 10% milkfat and usually between 10% and as high as 16% fat in some premium ice creams
*9 to 12% milk solids-not-fat: this component, also known as the serum solids, contains the proteins (caseins and whey proteins) and carbohydrates (lactose) found in milk
*12 to 16% sweeteners: usually a combination of sucrose and glucose-based corn syrup sweeteners
*0.2 to 0.5% stabilisers and emulsifiers
*55% to 64% water, which comes from the milk or other ingredients.

These compositions are percentage by weight. Since ice cream can contain as much as half air by volume, these numbers may be reduced by as much as half if cited by volume. In terms of dietary considerations, the percentages by weight are more relevant. Even the low-fat products have high caloric content: Ben and Jerry’s No-Fat Vanilla Fudge contains 150 calories (630 kJ) per half-cup due to its high sugar content.

Mrs Marshall’s Cookery Book, published in 1888, endorsed serving ice cream in cones, but the idea definitely predated that. Agnes

Ice cream cone

Marshall was a celebrated cookery writer of her day and helped to popularise ice cream. She patented and manufactured an ice cream maker and was the first person to suggest using liquefied gases to freeze ice cream after seeing a demonstration at the Royal Institution.

Reliable evidence proves that ice cream cones were served in the 19th century, and their popularity increased greatly during the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904. According to legend, at the World’s Fair an ice cream seller had run out of the cardboard dishes used to put ice cream scoops in, so they could not sell any more produce. Next door to the ice cream booth was a Syrian waffle booth, unsuccessful due to intense heat; the waffle maker offered to make cones by rolling up his waffles and the new product sold well, and was widely copied by other vendors.

The following is a partial list of ice cream-like frozen desserts and snacks:

*Ais kacang: a dessert in Malaysia and Singapore made from shaved ice, syrup, and boiled red bean and topped with evaporated milk. Sometimes, other small ingredients like raspberries and durians are added in, too.
*Dondurma: Turkish ice cream, made of salep and mastic resin
*Frozen custard: at least 10% milk fat and at least 1.4% egg yolk and much less air beaten into it, similar to Gelato, fairly rare. Known in Italy as Semifreddo.
*Frozen yogurt: a low-fat or fat-free alternative made with yogurt
*Gelato: an Italian frozen dessert having a lower milk fat content than ice cream.
*Halo-halo: a popular Filipino dessert that is a mixture of shaved ice and milk to which are added various boiled sweet beans and fruits, and served cold in a tall glass or bowl.
*Ice milk: less than 10% milk fat and lower sweetening content, once marketed as “ice milk” but now sold as low-fat ice cream in the

Raspberry sorbet

United States.
*Popsicle (ice pop or ice lolly): frozen fruit puree, fruit juice, or flavored sugar water on a stick or in a flexible plastic sleeve.
*Kulfi: Believed to have been introduced to South Asia by the Mughal conquest in the 16th century; its origins trace back to the cold snacks and desserts of Arab and Mediterranean cultures.
*Mellorine: non-dairy, with vegetable fat substituted for milk fat
*Parevine: Kosher non-dairy frozen dessert established in 1969 in New York
*Sherbet: 1–2% milk fat and sweeter than ice cream.
*Sorbet: fruit puree with no dairy products
*Snow cones, made from balls of crushed ice topped with sweet syrup served in a paper cone, are consumed in many parts of the world. The most common places to find snow cones in the United States are at amusement parks.
*Maple toffee: A popular springtime treat in maple-growing areas is maple toffee, where maple syrup boiled to a concentrated state is poured over fresh snow congealing in a toffee-like mass, and then eaten from a wooden stick used to pick it up from the snow.

Using liquid nitrogen to freeze ice cream is an old idea and has been used for many years to harden ice cream. The use of liquid nitrogen in the primary freezing of ice cream, that is to effect the transition from the liquid to the frozen state without the use of a conventional ice cream freezer, has only recently started to see commercialization. Some commercial innovations have been documented in the National Cryogenic Society Magazine “Cold Facts”. The most noted brands are Dippin’ Dots, Blue Sky Creamery, Project Creamery, and Sub Zero Cryo Creamery. The preparation results in a column of white condensed water vapor cloud, reminiscent of popular depictions of witches’ cauldrons. The ice cream, dangerous to eat while still “steaming,” is allowed to rest until the liquid nitrogen is completely vaporised. Sometimes ice cream is frozen to the sides of the container, and must be allowed to thaw.

Making ice cream with liquid nitrogen has advantages over conventional freezing. Due to the rapid freezing, the crystal grains are smaller, giving the ice cream a creamier texture, and allowing one to get the same texture by using less milkfat. Such ice crystals will grow very quickly via the processes of recrystallization, thereby obviating the original benefits unless steps are taken to inhibit ice crystal growth.

For similar reasons, good results can also be achieved with the more readily available “dry ice” and authors such as Heston Blumenthal have published recipes to produce ice cream and sorbet using a simple blender.

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