One of America’s Favorites – Muffin

July 23, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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A chocolate muffin

A muffin is an individual-sized, baked product. It can refer to two distinct items, a part-raised flatbread and a cupcake-like quickbread. The flatbread is of British or European derivation, and dates from at least the early 18th century, while the quickbread originated in North America during the 19th century. Both are common worldwide today.

Quickbread muffins (known in Britain as “American muffins” or simply as “muffins”) originated in the United States in the mid-19th century. The use of the term to describe what are essentially cup cakes or buns did not become common usage in Britain until the last decades of the 20th century on the back of the spread of coffee shops such as Starbucks. (There is lingering resistance in the UK to the term as being inapplicable to cakes.) They are similar to cupcakes in size and cooking methods, the main difference being that cupcakes tend to be sweet desserts using cake batter and which are often topped with sugar icing (American frosting). Muffins are available in both savoury varieties, such as cornmeal and cheese muffins, or sweet varieties such as blueberry, chocolate chip, lemon or banana flavours. They are often eaten as a breakfast food, often accompanied by coffee or tea. Fresh baked muffins are sold by bakeries, donut shops and some fast food restaurants and coffeehouses. Factory baked muffins are sold at grocery stores and convenience stores and are also served in some coffee shops and cafeterias.

Quickbread Muffin

Recipes for quick bread muffins are common in 19th-century American cookbooks. Recipes for yeast-based muffins, which were sometimes called “common muffins” or “wheat muffins” in 19th-century American cookbooks, can be found in much older cookbooks. In her Boston Cooking-School Cook Book, Fannie Farmer gave recipes for both types of muffins, both those that used yeast to raise the dough and those that used a quick bread method, using muffin rings to shape the English muffins. Farmer indicated that stove top “baking”, as is done with yeast dough, was a useful method when baking in an oven was not practical.

 

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One of America’s Favorites – Fry Bread

November 3, 2014 at 6:30 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Frybread

Frybread

Fry Bread (also spelled fry bread) is a flat dough fried or deep-fried in oil, shortening, or lard. The dough is generally leavened by soured milk, baking powder or yeast (rarely). Fry Bread can be eaten alone or with various toppings such as honey, jam, or hot beef. Fry Bread can also be made into tacos, like Indian tacos. It is a simple complement to meals.

 
According to Navajo tradition, fry bread was created in 1864 using the flour, sugar, salt and lard that was given to them by the United States government when the Navajo, who were living in Arizona, were forced to make the 300-mile journey known as the “Long Walk” and relocate to Bosque Redondo, New Mexico onto land that could not easily support their traditional staples of vegetables and beans.

For many Native Americans, “fry bread links generation with generation and also connects the present to the painful narrative of Native American history.” It is often served both at home and at gatherings. The way it is served varies from region to region and different tribes have different recipes. It can be found in its many ways at state fairs and pow-wows, but what is served to the paying public may be different from what is served in private homes and in the context of tribal family relations.

 

 

A frybread taco, Indian taco, or Navajo taco, is a frybread topped with various items normally found in tacos.

A frybread taco, Indian taco, or Navajo taco, is a frybread topped with various items normally found in tacos.

A typical fry bread recipe consists of flour, water, salt, a small amount of oil, and baking powder. The ingredients are mixed and worked into a simple dough, and covered with a cloth for 30 minutes to an hour before being formed into small balls, and are either rolled or pulled into flat discs prior to frying in hot oil. Many variations of this basic recipe exist, including substituting mayonnaise for oil in the dough (which produces a crisp, crunchy texture that resists getting soggy – ideal for Navajo tacos), and leavening the dough with a small container of yogurt or soured milk instead of using baking powder or yeast (produces a rich, sourdough flavor but requires several hours to fully leaven after the dough is prepared). Most frybread recipes do not use yeast at all because it was not typically available to Native people when this foodstuff was developed. In many Native american households, fry bread dough is mixed early in the morning and left in a large bowl covered with a cloth to leaven and is used throughout the day to prepare fresh bread when needed.

 

 

 

Fry Bread Facts

* Fry bread was named the official “state bread” of South Dakota in 2005.
* Fry bread is also known in South American cooking as a cachanga.
* In Hungary (Central Europe), there is a similar food called Lángos.

 

“Meatless Monday” Recipe – Caramelized Onion & White Bean Flatbread

June 23, 2014 at 9:39 AM | Posted in Eating Well, Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This one comes from one of my favorite sites and favorite magazines, EatingWell. I’ve left the link to the recipe and the EatingWell website. It’s stocked full of delicious and healthy recipes and tips!

 
Caramelized Onion & White Bean FlatbreadEatingWell2
Here we top pizza with herbed mashed beans, sliced plum tomatoes, sweet caramelized onions and some shredded Gouda for a tasty flatbread that will have you rethinking pizza toppings.

 
INGREDIENTS
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 large onion, thinly sliced lengthwise
1/4 teaspoon salt
20 ounces prepared whole-wheat pizza dough, (see Note), thawed if frozen
2 tablespoons minced fresh oregano, or 2 teaspoons dried
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 15-ounce can white beans, rinsed (see Note)
3 tablespoons water
2 teaspoons white-wine vinegar
2 plum tomatoes, thinly sliced
1 cup finely shredded smoked Gouda, or Cheddar cheese
2 tablespoons pepitas, (see Note), optional
PREPARATION
Place oven rack in the lowest position; preheat to 450°F. Coat a large noninsulated baking sheet with cooking spray.
Combine oil, onion and salt in a medium saucepan. Cover and cook over medium-high heat, stirring often, until the onion is softened, 5 to 7 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low, uncover and cook, stirring occasionally, until very soft and golden, 5 to 8 minutes more.
Meanwhile, roll out dough on a lightly floured surface to the size of the baking sheet. Transfer to the baking sheet. Bake until puffed and lightly crisped on the bottom, 8 to 10 minutes.
Stir oregano and pepper into the onion. Transfer half the onion to a small bowl. Add beans to the remaining onion; cook over medium heat, stirring often, until heated through, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer the bean mixture to a food processor, add water and vinegar and pulse until a coarse paste forms.
Spread the bean paste over the pizza crust. Top with the reserved onion, tomatoes, cheese and pepitas, if using. Bake on the bottom rack until the crust is crispy and golden and the cheese is melted, 11 to 13 minutes. Slice and serve.

 
TIPS & NOTES
Notes: Look for whole-wheat pizza-dough balls at your supermarket. Check the ingredient list to make sure the dough doesn’t contain any hydrogenated oils. Or visit eatingwell.com for an easy pizza-dough recipe.
While we love the convenience of canned beans, they tend to be high in sodium. Give them a good rinse before adding to a recipe to rid them of some of their sodium (up to 35 percent) or opt for low-sodium or no-salt-added varieties. (Our recipes are analyzed with rinsed, regular canned beans.) Or, if you have the time, cook your own beans from scratch. You’ll find our Bean Cooking Guide at eatingwell.com/guides.
Hulled pumpkin seeds, also known as pepitas, are dusky green and have a delicate nutty flavor. They can be found in the natural-food or bulk sections of many supermarkets.
NUTRITION
Per serving: 365 calories; 11 g fat (3 g sat, 5 g mono); 10 mg cholesterol; 51 g carbohydrates; 13 g protein; 6 g fiber; 576 mg sodium; 296 mg potassium.

 
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/caramelized_onion_white_bean_flatbread.html

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