Vietnamese Pork Rolls SATURDAY

April 27, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes | Leave a comment
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I came across a recipe for Vietnamese Pork Rolls. I checked out several versions of it and I’m passing along the one from the CooksRecipes website. You’ll be using Pork Cutlets to make the dish. As I said you can find this recipe at the CooksRecipes website which has a huge selection of recipes to please all tastes, diets, and cuisines so check it out today! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

Vietnamese Pork Rolls

Vietnamese Pork RollsThese rolls are special, yet not hard to make. A simply dressed green salad with cucumber or radish would be a perfect accompaniment. Cut them on the diagonal or cut the lettuce leaves into thirds and roll up smaller, hors d’oeuvre-size pieces.

Recipe Ingredients:
Dressing:
1 tablespoon Asian fish sauce
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
1 garlic clove, minced
Pinch red pepper flakes

Pork:
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 pound pork cutlets
1 (1/2 pound) head Napa cabbage, shredded (3 cups)
1 small red bell pepper, cut into thin strips
8 large Boston lettuce leaves
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Cooking Directions:
1 – For the dressing: Whisk together fish sauce, lime juice, ginger, garlic, and red pepper flakes in a small bowl.
2 – For the pork: Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Season pork with salt and pepper and sauté until lightly browned, 3 minutes per side. Remove from heat and slice into thin strips. Toss with 1 tablespoon of the dressing.
3 – Combine cabbage, bell pepper, and remaining dressing in a large bowl. Lay lettuce leaves on a clean, dry work surface. Divide pork among leaves. Top with cabbage mixture and roll tightly, tucking edges in as you go. Place rolls, seam side down, on a cutting board, cut in half, and serve.
Makes 4 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/4 of recipe): 220 calories, 10 g fat, 2.5 g saturated fat, 26 g protein, 6 g carbohydrate, 2 g dietary fiber, 490 mg sodium.
https://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/vietnamese_pork_rolls_recipe.html

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Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – PHO (FUH)

March 27, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s 2nd Recipe for the Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is – PHO (FUH). Made using the Buffalo Broth that I posted a recipe for. Some of the other ingredients you are going to need are; Buffalo Tenderloin (frozen), Fish Sauce, Spices, and Rice Noodles. This sounds incredible! You can find this recipe or purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Tenderloin along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

PHO (FUH)
So good, you’ll crave it!

Ingredients:
2 – quarts Buffalo Broth
¼ – cup fish sauce
2 -heads garlic
2 – heads ginger, sliced
4 – pods star anise (I used more – love anise.)
2 – sticks cinnamon (I think it’s easy to overdo the cinnamon – but add to your liking.)
1 – 1 lb. package rice noodles, cooked al dente
1 – 8oz. Buffalo Tenderloin, frozen
1 – jalapeno sliced
1 – handful cilantro leaves
1 – handful basil leaves
3 – green onions
1 – fresh lime, wedged
Sesame Chili Oil
Chili Flake

Preparation:

1 – In a pot over medium high heat, add star anise and cinnamon. Toast in the pan for about 5 minutes, tossing occasionally.
2 – Add broth, fish sauce, garlic heads and ginger, and bring to a gentle boil.
3 – Cover and reduce heat to low and allow broth to simmer for 20 minutes.
4 – While broth is simmering slice (shave) the frozen tenderloin with a very sharp knife or peeler. Place in a bowl and sprinkle with a bit of sea salt and toss.
5 – To serve, place hot rice noodles in bowls, top with the shaved tenderloin, pour in the broth, and add jalapeno and fresh herbs. Squeeze with fresh lime and add chili oil and chili flake to taste.

MORE PLEASE!

https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/hybrid-buffalo-broth

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Smoked Thai Turkey Sandwiches

April 27, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Smoked Thai Turkey Sandwiches. Made using JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Breast along with Sugar, Spice, Carrots, Fish Sauce, and more! Try a Sandwich with a Thai taste. You can find this recipe at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018! https://www.jennieo.com/

 

Smoked Thai Turkey Sandwiches
Break out of your sandwich shell with this appe-Thai-zing creation! It’s got sugar, spice and everything nice. Like pickled carrots and pulled turkey in a zesty fish sauce? You’ll never be bored with bread again.

INGREDIENTS
2 tablespoons brown sugar
2 tablespoons ground paprika
4 tablespoons white sugar, divided
1 tablespoon garlic salt
2 teaspoons fresh ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1 package JENNIE-O® All Natural* Turkey Breast
3¼ cups warm water, divided
½ cup matchstick carrots
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
2 teaspoons salt, if desired
¼ cup honey
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 teaspoon Thai fish sauce (add while mixing, do not heat)
8 hamburger rolls

DIRECTIONS
1) Mix together rub seasonings: brown sugar, paprkia, 2 tablespoons white sugar, garlic salt, black pepper and cayenne pepper; cover turkey breast completely. Preheat grill to medium-high heat. Place turkey on hot grill and cook until internal temperature reaches well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
2) While turkey is cooking, prepare the pickled carrots by mixing: water, carrots, rice vinegar 2 tablespoons sugar, cilantro and salt, if desired in small bowl. Cover and let sit until ready to use.
3) When turkey is done cooking, remove from grill and set aside to cool about 10 minutes; shred and mix in chopped cilantro.
4) Mix sauce ingredients: honey, soysauce and lime juice in a small sauce pan over medium-high heat.
5) Once it comes to a boil, reduce to a simmer. Allow to gently bubble for 2 minutes, then shut off and pour over the pulled turkey. Mix. Add fish sauce and mix again.
6) Place some of the pickled matchstick carrots on the bottom half of each bun. Top with a generous helping of the Thai pulled turkey and cover with the top of the bun.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 280
Protein 30g
Carbohydrates 41g
Fiber 3g
Sugars 21g
Fat 11g
Cholesterol 80mg
Sodium 980mg
Saturated Fat 2.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1142-smoked-thai-turkey-sandwiches

Seafood of the Week – Fish Sauce

January 21, 2014 at 9:05 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | Leave a comment
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Fish sauce factory

Fish sauce factory

 

Fish sauce is an amber-colored liquid extracted from the fermentation of fish with sea salt. It is used as a condiment in various cuisines. Fish sauce is a staple ingredient in numerous cultures in Southeast Asia and the coastal regions of East Asia, and featured heavily in Cambodian, Philippine, Thai, and Vietnamese cuisine.
In addition to being added to dishes during the cooking process, fish sauce is also used as a base for a dipping condiment that is prepared in many different ways by cooks in each country mentioned for fish, shrimp, pork, and chicken. In parts of southern China, it is used as an ingredient for soups and casseroles. Fish sauce, and its derivatives, impart a umami flavor to food due to their glutamate content.

 

 

 
Most fish sauces (extracts) are made from raw fish, some from dried fish; most from only a single species, others from whatever is dredged up in the net, including some shellfish; most from whole fish, a few from only the blood or viscera. Most fish sauces contain only fish and salt, others add a variety of herbs and spices. Fish sauce that has been only briefly fermented has a pronounced fishy taste, while extended fermentation reduces this and gives the product a nuttier, richer and more savory flavor.

 

 

Phrik nam pla is served with nearly every Thai meal

Phrik nam pla is served with nearly every Thai meal

Southeast Asian

Southeast Asian fish sauce is often made from anchovies, salt and water, and is usually used in moderation because it is intensely flavoured. Anchovies and salt are arranged in wooden boxes to ferment and are slowly pressed, yielding the salty, fishy liquid. The salt extracts the liquid via osmosis.
The variety from Vietnam is called nước mắm. Popular brands include nước mắm Phú Quốc and nước mắm Phan Thiết. Nước chấm is a Vietnamese prepared fish sauce condiment dipping sauce that is savory, lightly sweet and salty tasting, and can even be sour and spicy if lime and chili peppers are added. The main components are fish sauce, water, and sugar. In Vietnam, there is a popular food item called mắm, which is made the same way as fish sauce, except that both the fish and the liquid extract, not just the liquid, are kept, and mắm is fermented for a shorter period than fish sauce. Mắm is either eaten as is (uncooked), or cooked in soups or stir-fries. Similar condiments from Thailand and Burma are called nam pla (น้ำปลา) and ngan bya yay (ငံပြာရည်) respectively. In Lao/Isan it is called nam pa, but a chunkier, more aromatic version known as padaek is also used. In Cambodia, it is known as teuk trei (ទឹកត្រី), of which there are a variety of sauces using fish sauce as a base.
The Indonesian semi-solid fish paste terasi, the Cambodian prahok and the Malay fermented krill brick belacan or budu from liquid anchovies are other popular variations of the same theme.
The similar Philippine version common to Indochina is called patis. Patis which is a by-product of bagoong is nearly always cooked prior to consumption (even if used as an accent to salads or other raw dishes), or used as a cooking ingredient. It is used in cooking many dishes including a rice porridge called arroz caldo and as a condiment for fried fish. It is also used in place of table salt in meals to enhance the flavor of the food, where it can either be dashed from a dispensing bottle onto the food, or poured into a saucer and mixed with calamansi and used as a dipping sauce.
Southeast Asians generally use fish sauce as a cooking sauce. However, there is a sweet and sour version of this sauce which is used more commonly as a dipping sauce (see nước chấm). In Thai cuisine, fish sauce is used both in cooking and also served at the table for use as a condiment, for instance in noodle soups. In addition, nearly every Thai meal is served with phrik nam pla as a condiment: a mixture of fish sauce, lime juice, and chopped bird’s eye chilies. Very often a few slices of garlic are also added to this sauce.
It is mainly the ethnic Chinese (usually Hokkien and Teochew) who cook with fish sauce in Indonesia and Malaysia. Fish sauce is a staple of many dishes in cuisines such as Vietnamese, Thai and Cambodian.

Japanese Fish sauce,Shottsuru and Ishiru

Japanese Fish sauce,Shottsuru and Ishiru

 
Japanese
In Japan, it is used as a seasoning of local specialties. Ishiru in the Noto Peninsula is made from sardine and squid. Shottsuru of Akita Prefecture is chiefly made from sailfin sandfish. Ikanago shoyu of Kagawa Prefecture is made from sand lance. They are often reserved for the preparation of nabemono.

 
Korean
In Korea, it is called aekjeot or jeotgal, and is used as a crucial ingredient in many types of kimchi (usually from myoelchi, anchovy or kanari which is made from sand lance), both for taste and fermentation. The anchovy-based fish sauce lends itself well to the making of radish-type kimchi. Kanari-type fish sauce is more expensive than the anchovy-based fish sauce and is usually reserved for the preparation of special cabbage (baechu) kimchi. Saewoojeot (shrimp) is also popular as side sauce.

 
Western
Fish sauces are sometimes used in western cuisine, but they are generally prepared using fresh or packaged fish, not made from fermented fish.
The earliest known reports of fish sauce are from ancient Greece between 4-3rd century BC. It was made with a lower salt content than modern fish sauces.
A similar fish sauce was ubiquitous in Classical Roman cooking, where in Latin it is known as garum or liquamen, and also existed in many varieties such as oenogarum (mixed with wine), oxygarum (mixed with vinegar) and meligarum (mixed with honey). It was one of the trade specialties in Hispania Baetica. It was made of a variety of fish including tuna, mackerel, moray eel, and anchovies. Garum was frequently maligned as smelling bad or rotten, being called, for example, “evil-smelling fish sauce.” “Garum” is said to be similar to modern colatura d’alici, a fish sauce used in Neapolitan cuisine.
In English it was formerly translated as fishpickle. The original Worcestershire sauce is a related product because it is fermented and contains anchovies.

 

Wild Idea Buffalo – Asian Style Meatballs with Cilantro Yogurt Sauce

December 8, 2013 at 10:27 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 5 Comments
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Here’s the second of three Buffalo Meatball recipes from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo, Enjoy!

 

 
Asian Style Meatballs with Cilantro Yogurt SauceWild Idea Buffalo Asian Style Meatballs with Cilantro Yogurt Sauce
(Makes 16 to 20 meatballs)

 

 

Ingredients:

1 lb. Ground Buffalo

1½ tablespoons fish sauce

1 tablespoon sesame oil

1 teaspoon lemon zest

1 tablespoon lemon juice

½ cup shallots, finely diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

½ cup cilantro, finely chopped

1 tablespoons mint, finely chopped

¼ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon black pepper

 

Preparation:

1) Mix all ingredients together, except buffalo.

2) Crumble ground buffalo meat into spice mixture. Mix thoroughly with hands.

3) Place mixture in food processor and flash pulse process, until slightly sticky. Allow meat mixture to rest 2 to 24 hours before cooking. This can be done before or after forming meatballs.

4) Form into 1 oz. or desired size meatballs and place on lightly oiled baking sheet.

5) Broil meatballs in oven on middle rack, until browned, about 5 minutes.

Serve with cucumbers and radishes with Cilantro Yogurt Sauce. *Optional: Serve on a bed of brown basmati rice.

 

Cilantro Yogurt Sauce (Makes 1 ½ cups)
Ingredients:

2 cups fresh cilantro, chopped

¼ cup fresh mint leaves

1 jalapeno, seeded

2 tablespoons garlic, chopped

1 teaspoon cumin

1 tablespoon lemon juice

½ teaspoon salt

1 cup whole milk or low-fat yogurt, room temperature
Instructions: Place all ingredients but yogurt into blender and puree. Pour yogurt into bowl and whisk in cilantro mixture. This sauce is great on so many things and will keep well in refrigerator for later use.
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2013/december-story-by-jill-obrien/

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Ground Round 99 free

Wild Idea Buffalo – 1 lb. Ground Round, 99% Lean
We use the Top Round and the Sirloin Tip cuts and remove all visible fat, for this 99% super lean ground steak. It’s deep red color, dark rich taste, is deliciously low in calories and high in protein. Substitute for any of your favorite ground dishes. Also, delicious for the popular Lebanese dish, kibbeh (pictured) – recipe with purchase. 1 lb. package.

 

 

http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/collections/a-la-carte/products/1-lb-ground-round-99-lean

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Fragrant Stir Fried Buffalo

August 14, 2013 at 9:31 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This weeks recipe is – Fragrant Stir Fried Buffalo! The dish is made with the Buffalo Premium Steak Strips which can be purchased on the Wild Idea web site, I’ve left the links here in the post.

 

Fragrant Stir Fried BuffaloWild Idea Buffalo Fragrant Stir Fried Buffalo
By: Jill O’Brien

 

If you are looking to try out a new take on stir fry, then check out this fresh, fragrant, and light recipe. Not only is it good for you, but it tastes delicious!!

Serves 4. Approximately 243 calories per serving, (calories calculated with out rice or noodles).

Note: The recipe below is not diet food, but it’s good for you, simple and tasty. Adjust vegetables to your preference. Serving with white rice makes for a prettier plate, but wild rice is healthier, (which Dan thinks taste like dirt), so we compromise and do a mix. Rice noodles are also a nice accompaniment.

 

Ingredients:

1 – 1 lb. Buffalo Steak Strips, rinse and pat dry
2 – Tablespoons Sesame Oil
1 ½ – cup White Wine
1 – Tablespoon Lemon Juice
1 – Tablespoon Asian Fish Sauce
1 – Tablespoon Red Curry Paste + to taste
2 – Teaspoons Brown Sugar
1 – Red Bell Pepper, julienned
1 – Red Onion, julienned
1 – Head Broccoli Florets — about 2 cups
1 – Cup fresh Cherry Tomatoes, halved (or) sub ½ cups chopped Sundried Tomatoes
1 – Cup Basil, julienned

 

 

Directions:

* Mix together white wine, lemon, fish sauce, curry paste, and brown sugar.
* Over high heat, heat 1 tablespoon sesame oil in heavy sauté pan or wok.
* Add Buffalo Steak Strips and flash sauté for 1 minute. Turning to brown.
* Remove Buffalo to platter and lower heat to medium.
* Heat remaining oil in same pan and add the pepper, onion, and broccoli. Sauté for 2 minutes.
* Add wine mixture and tomatoes. Bring to simmer.
* Add buffalo back to pan and basil. Quick stir to incorporate. Remove form heat and serve immediately.
* Serve on rice or rice noodles and garnish with fresh basil leaf and lemon wedge.

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/fragrant-stir-fried-buffalo/

 

 

 

 

1 lb. Premium Steak StripsWild Idea Buffalo Buffalo Steak Strips
Pre-cut strips from the Tenderloin, New York Strip, Ribeye, and Sirloin. Perfect for stir frying or on the grill. 1 lb package

 

http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/products/1-lb-premium-steak-strips

Healthy Thai Food Recipes

May 19, 2013 at 11:11 AM | Posted in cooking, diabetes | 1 Comment
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Some delicious and healthy Thai Food Recipes from theEating Well web site. http://www.eatingwell.com/?utm_source=EWTWNL&esrc=nwewtw

 

Eating Well

 

Healthy Thai Food Recipes
Healthy Thai food recipes that are easy to make at home.
Thai food is full of flavor, but you don’t need a pantry full of exotic ingredients to prepare it. If you like to make Thai recipes at home, it’s a good idea to keep fish sauce, garlic, chiles and lime juice on hand. These simple Thai recipes will get you started making terrific Thai food at home.
Thai Chicken & Mango Stir-Fry
Both ripe and underripe mango work well in this chicken and vegetable stir-fry. If the mangoes you have are less ripe, use 2 teaspoons brown sugar. If they’re ripe and sweet, just use 1 teaspoon or omit the brown sugar altogether….

 

Thai Bouillabaisse
This flavorful seafood soup combines elements of the famous French bouillabaisse with the distinct Thai flavors of lemongrass, lime, ginger and hot chiles. Use two chile peppers if you like heat. Be sure to simmer, not boil, the soup or the seafood will be overcooked. Serve with a crusty whole-grain baguette to soak up the broth……

 

* Click the link below to get these and other great Thai recipes.

 

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_thai_food_recipes?utm_source=EWTWNL&esrc=nwewtw051413

Bison Thai Salad

February 20, 2012 at 10:14 AM | Posted in bison, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
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Bison Thai Salad

1/2 a head of cabbage
1/4 cup red cabbage, shredded
2 tablespoons fish sauce
2 limes
2 bison New York strip steaks
Black pepper
2 cloves garlic, crushed
Salt
1 stalk lemongrass
1 serrano chili
1 bunch green onions, sliced
2 shallots, minced
1/4 cup of mint
1/4 cup cilantro

*First, shred the cabbage and combine with the shredded red cabbage to add some color.
*Now add 1 tablespoon of the fish sauce and juice from half of the lime.
*Toss to mix all the flavors and set aside to marinate.
*Next, season the strip steaks with pepper, garlic, and salt-make sure to get both sides.
*Place the steaks on a preheated grill and cook on each side for 3 minutes. When the steaks are done, let them rest for 8 to 10 minutes so that the juices redistribute.
*Now, cut off the stem and root end of the lemongrass, remove the tough outer leaf and mince. Add the serrano chili, the green onions, and the shallots.
*To the ingredients, add the other tablespoon of the fish sauce and the juice from one and a half limes.
*Continue chopping to mix all the flavors and then add the mint and cilantro and give it a rough chop.
*Add this marinade to a bowl.
*Thinly slice the bison steaks against the grain to make sure the meat stays moist and tender and add to the bowl. Toss to coat.
*To plate this exotic dish, add the marinating cabbage salad and top with the bison.

Makes 2 servings.

Pad Thai – Thailand

October 7, 2011 at 2:31 PM | Posted in Food, noodle | 4 Comments
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Pad Thai or Phat Thai is a dish of stir-fried rice noodles with eggs, fish sauce, tamarind juice, red chilli pepper, plus

Pad Thai in Bangkok

any combination of bean sprouts, shrimp, chicken, or tofu, garnished with crushed peanuts, coriander and lime, the juice of which can be added along with

Thai condiments. It is usually served with spring onions and pieces of raw banana flower.

The dish had been known in ancient Siam in various forms for centuries. The variant of noodle is thought to have been brought to the ancient Thai capital of Ayuthaya by Vietnamese traders. However, it was first made popular as a national dish by Luang Phibunsongkhram when he was prime minister during the 1930s and 1940s, partly as an element of his campaign for Thai nationalism and centralization, and partly for a campaign to reduce rice consumption in Thailand. The Thai economy at this time was heavily dependent on rice exports; Phibunsongkhram hoped to increase the amount available for export by launching a campaign to educate the poor in the production of rice noodles, as well as in the preparation of these noodles with other ingredients to sell in small cafes and from street carts. Nowadays Pad Thai has become a widespread staple food and is one of Thailand’s national dishes.

Pad Thai Noodles with Shrimp

Ingredients:

8 oz. Thai rice noodles (linguini width), or enough for 2 people
1-2 cups raw or cooked shrimp, shells removed
1 shallot (OR 1/4 cup purple onion), finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
1-2 fresh red chilies (or as much as you like!), finely sliced
1 egg
2 cups bean sprouts
1/8 tsp. ground white pepper (OR substitute black pepper)
3 green onions, sliced finely
1/2 cup fresh coriander/cilantro
1/4 cup dry roasted peanuts, ground or chopped
2-3 Tbsp. oil for stir-frying (coconut, peanut, corn, sunflower, or canola are all good)
3 Tbsp. chicken stock
wedges of lime for serving
PAD THAI SAUCE:
3/4 Tbsp. tamarind paste (available at Asian/Indian food stores)
1/4 cup hot water
2+1/2 Tbsp. fish sauce (available in tall bottles at Asian food stores)
1-3 tsp. chili sauce (to taste), OR 1/2 to 1 tsp. dried crushed chili
3 Tbsp. palm sugar OR brown sugar

Preparation:

Bring a large pot of water to boil, then remove from heat. Dunk in the rice noodles. Soak the noodles until soft enough to eat, but still firm and a little “crunchy”. Drain and rinse the noodles thoroughly with cold water. Set aside. Tip:Avoid over-softening the noodles at this point, as they will be fried later, and you want them to turn out chewy, not soggy.
In a small bowl or cup, dissolve the tamarind paste in the hot water. Then add the other Pad Thai Sauce ingredients (fish sauce, chili, and brown sugar). Stir well to dissolve the sugar. Add as much or as little chili sauce as you prefer, but don’t skimp on the sugar – it is needed to balance out the sourness of the tamarind. Set aside.
Warm a wok or large frying pan over medium-high heat. Add 2 Tbsp. oil and swirl around, then add the shallots, garlic, and chili. Stir-fry 1 minute.
Add the shrimp plus 2-3 Tbsp. chicken stock. Stir-fry 2-3 minutes, or until shrimp are pink and plump. (If using cooked shrimp, only stir-fry 1 minute.)
Push ingredients aside, making room in the center of your wok/pan. Add another 1 Tbsp. oil, then crack in the egg. Stir-fry to scramble (30 seconds to 1 minute).
Add the drained noodles and drizzle over the pad thai sauce. Use 2 utensils and a gentle “tossing” motion to combine everything together (like tossing a salad). Keep the heat between medium and medium-high – you want your pan hot enough to cook the noodles, but not so hot that the noodles burns. Stir-fry 4-5 minutes.
Add the bean sprouts and continue stir-frying 1 more minute, or until noodles are chewy-delicious and a little bit sticky.
Remove from heat and taste-test, adding more fish sauce until desired taste is achieved (I usually add another 1-2 Tbsp).
Sprinkle over the white pepper, onion, coriander, and peanuts, and garnish with lime wedges (these should be squeezed over before eating). Toss one more time and serve. Thai chili sauce can also be served on the side if desired. ENJOY!
http://thaifood.about.com/od/oodlesofnoodles/r/padthaishrimp2.htm

Vietnamese Pork Rolls

July 19, 2011 at 10:46 AM | Posted in baking, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, low calorie, low carb | Leave a comment
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Vietnamese Pork Rolls

These rolls are special, yet not hard to make. A simply dressed green salad with cucumber or radish would be a perfect accompaniment. Cut them on the diagonal or cut the lettuce leaves into thirds and roll up smaller, hors d’oeuvre-size pieces.

Dressing:
1 tablespoon Asian fish sauce
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
1 garlic clove, minced
Pinch red pepper flakes

Pork:
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 pound pork cutlets
1 (1/2 pound) head napa cabbage, shredded (3 cups)
1 small red bell pepper, cut into thin strips
8 large Boston lettuce leaves
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1. For the dressing: Whisk together fish sauce, lime juice, ginger, garlic, and red pepper flakes in a small bowl.
2. For the pork: Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Season pork with salt and pepper and sauté until lightly browned, 3 minutes per side. Remove from heat and slice into thin strips. Toss with 1 tablespoon of the dressing.
3. Combine cabbage, bell pepper, and remaining dressing in a large bowl. Lay lettuce leaves on a clean, dry work surface. Divide pork among leaves. Top with cabbage mixture and roll tightly, tucking edges in as you go. Place rolls, seam side down, on a cutting board, cut in half, and serve.

Makes 4 servings. Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 20 minutes (includes assembling rolls)

Nutrition at a Glance: Per serving: 220 calories, 10 g fat, 2.5 g saturated fat, 26 g protein, 6 g carbohydrate, 2 g dietary fiber, 490 mg sodium

Source: This delicious recipe is from the book The South Beach Diet Quick & Easy Cookbook by Arthur Agatston, MD

http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic-recipes/diabetic-entree-recipes_4.html

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