One of America’s Favorites – Falafel

September 8, 2014 at 5:29 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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Falafel balls

Falafel balls

Falafel is a deep-fried ball or patty made from ground chickpeas, fava beans, or both. Falafel is a traditional Middle Eastern food, usually served in a pita, which acts as a pocket, or wrapped in a flatbread known as lafa; “falafel” also frequently refers to a wrapped sandwich that is prepared in this way. The falafel balls are topped with salads, pickled vegetables, hot sauce, and drizzled with tahini-based sauces. Falafel balls may also be eaten alone as a snack or served as part of a meze (appetizers).

Falafel is a common dish eaten throughout the Middle East. The fritters are now found around the world as a replacement for meat and as a form of street food.

 

 

 
Falafel grew to become a common form of street food or fast food in the Middle East. The croquettes are regularly eaten as part of meze. During Ramadan, falafel balls are sometimes eaten as part of the iftar, the meal that breaks the daily fast after sunset. Falafel became so popular that McDonald’s for a time served a “McFalafel” in some countries. Falafel is still popular with the Copts, who cook large volumes during religious holidays. Debates over the origin of falafel have sometimes devolved into political discussions about the relationship between Arabs and Israelis. In modern times, falafel has been considered a national dish of Egypt, the Palestine, and of Israel. Resentment exists amongst many Palestinians for what they see as the appropriation of their dish by Israelis. Additionally, the Lebanese Industrialists’ Association has raised assertions of copyright infringement against Israel concerning falafel.

Falafel plays an iconic role in Israeli cuisine and is widely considered to be the national dish of the country. While falafel is not a specifically Jewish dish, it was eaten by Mizrahi Jews in their countries of origin. Later, it was adopted by early Jewish immigrants to Palestine. Due to its being entirely plant-based, it is considered parve under Jewish dietary laws and gained acceptance with Jews because it could be eaten with meat or dairy meals.

 

 

 

 

Falafel sandwich

Falafel sandwich

In North America, prior to the 1970s, falafel was found only in Middle Eastern and Jewish neighborhoods and restaurants. Today, the dish is a common and popular street food in many cities throughout North America.
Falafel has become popular among vegetarians and vegans, as an alternative to meat-laden street foods, and is now sold in packaged mixes in health-food stores. While traditionally thought of as being used to make veggie burgers, its use has expanded as more and more people have adopted it as a source of protein. In the United States, falafel’s versatility has allowed for the reformulating of recipes for meatloaf, sloppy Joes and spaghetti and meatballs into vegetarian dishes.

Today, falafel is eaten all over the world.

 

 

 
Falafel is made from fava beans or chickpeas, or a combination of the two. The use of chickpeas is predominant in most Middle Eastern countries. The dish is usually made with chickpeas in Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Israel and Palestine. This version is the most popular in the West. The Egyptian variety uses fava beans.

When chickpeas are used, they are not cooked prior to use (cooking the chickpeas will cause the falafel to fall apart, requiring adding some flour to use as a binder). Instead they are soaked (sometimes with baking soda) overnight, then ground together with various ingredients such as parsley, scallions, and garlic. Spices such as cumin and coriander are often added to the beans for added flavor. Fava beans must be cooked, for medical reasons. The mixture is shaped into balls or patties. This can be done by hand or with a tool called an aleb falafel (falafel mould). The mixture is usually deep-fried, or it can be oven baked.

 

 

 

 

When not served alone, falafel is often served with unleavened bread when it is wrapped within lafa or stuffed in a hollow pita. Tomatoes, lettuce, cucumbers, and other garnishes can be added. Falafel is commonly accompanied by tahini.

Falafel is typically ball-shaped, but is sometimes made in other shapes, particularly donut-shaped. The inside of falafel may be green (from green herbs such as parsley or green onion), or tan.

 

 

 

Falafel balls of different sizes. Made from chickpeas.

Falafel balls of different sizes. Made from chickpeas.

When made with chickpeas, falafel is high in protein, complex carbohydrates, and fiber. Chickpeas are also low in fat and salt and contain no cholesterol. Key nutrients are calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, zinc, copper, manganese, vitamin C, thiamine, pantothenic acid, vitamin B, and folate. Phytochemicals include beta-carotene. Falafel is high in soluble fiber, which has been shown to be effective in lowering blood cholesterol.

 

Falafel can be baked to reduce the high fat content associated with frying. Although baking alters the texture and flavor, it is a preparation technique often recommended to people suffering from such health problems as diabetes.

 

“Meatless Monday Recipe” – Falafel

April 14, 2014 at 7:51 AM | Posted in beans, Meatless Monday, vegetables | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe comes from one of my favorite sites, Cook’s Recipes. Beans, Onions, and Garlic are just 3 of the items that go in Falafel. The link is at the bottom of the post, Enjoy!
Falafel

No recipe image available.Seasoned, breaded and fried ground garbanzo bean (chickpea) patties served with a creamy, fresh tomato-cucumber relish.

Recipe Ingredients:

1 (15-ounce) can garbanzo beans, rinsed, drained (1 1/2 cups)
1 medium onion, coarsely chopped
1/4 cup packed parsley leaves
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon dried oregano leaves
2 to 3 teaspoons lemon juice
Salt and ground black pepper, to taste
1 cup dry plain bread crumbs – divided use
1/4 cup chopped raisins
1 egg yolk
Olive oil cooking spray

Tomato-Cucumber Relish:
1/2 cup chopped tomato
1/2 cup chopped cucumber
1/3 cup fat-free plain yogurt
1/2 teaspoon dried mint leaves (optional)
Salt and ground black pepper, to taste

Cooking Directions:

Process garbanzo beans, onion, parsley, garlic, cumin, and oregano in food processor until smooth; season to taste with lemon juice, salt, and pepper. Stir in 1/2 cup bread crumbs, raisins, and egg yolk.
Form bean mixture into 16 patties, using about 1 1/2 tablespoons for each. Coat patties with remaining 1/2 cup bread crumbs.
Spray large skillet with cooking spray; heat over medium heat until hot. Cook falafel over medium heat until browned on the bottom, 2 to 3 minutes. Spray tops of falafel with cooking spray and turn; cook until browned on the bottom, 2 to 3 minutes. Arrange 4 falafel on each plate; serve with Tomato-Cucumber Relish.
For Tomato-Cucumber Relish: Combine tomato, cucumber, yogurt, and mint leaves in small bowl; season to taste with salt and pepper. Makes 1 cup.
Makes 4 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/4 of recipe): Calories 311; Fat 4g; % Calories from Fat 12; Carbohydrate 58g Folate 105mcg; Sodium 575mg; Protein 12g; Dietary Fiber 7g; Cholesterol 54mg.

 
http://www.cooksrecipes.com/mless/falafel_recipe.html

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