VANILLA CREAM PUFFS

October 29, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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I have another Diabetic Friendly Dessert Recipe to pass along, VANILLA CREAM PUFFS. The Puffs are made using Water, Salt, Splenda No Calorie Sweetener – Granulated, Butter, Flour, and Eggs. Also included is the recipe for the Custard which you’ll be using Splenda No Calorie Sweetener – Granulated, Cornstarch, 1% Low Fat Milk, Egg Yolks, Vanilla Extract, and Chocolate Sauce. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

VANILLA CREAM PUFFS
Ingredients

Cream Puffs Ingredients

1 cup water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 tablespoon Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1/4 cup butter
1 cup all-purpose flour
4 large eggs

Custard Filling Ingredients

2 tablespoons Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1 tablespoon cornstarch
2 cups 1% low-fat milk
2 egg yolks, lightly beaten
1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
3/4 cup commercial chocolate sauce

Directions

1 – Cream Puff Directions: Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.
2 – Combine water, salt, Splenda Granulated Sweetener and butter in a medium saucepan; bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring until butter melts. Add flour all at once, stirring vigorously with a wooden spoon until mixture leaves sides of pan and forms a smooth ball. The mixture resembles mashed potatoes. Remove from heat; cool 5 minutes.
3 – Transfer mixture to a mixing bowl. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing on low speed with an electric mixer. Scrap down the sides of bowl occasionally and beat until batter is smooth.
4 – Spoon mixture heaping tablespoonfuls onto an ungreased baking sheet, leaving 2 inches between puffs.
5 – Bake immediately for 35 minutes or until puffs are golden brown and have a crisp shell. (Do not open the oven door during the first 15 minutes of baking time.) Remove from oven and cool on wire racks.
6 – Custard Filling Directions: Combine Splenda Granulated Sweetener and cornstarch in a heavy saucepan; gradually stir in milk. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, 6 minutes or until mixture comes to a boil. Cook 1 additional minute, stirring constantly. Gradually stir about 1/4 the hot mixture into egg yolks; add to remaining hot mixture, stirring constantly. Bring mixture to a boil over medium heat, reduce heat and cook 3 minutes, stirring constantly. Remove from heat, stir in vanilla and strain mixture through a sieve; cover the surface of the custard with wax paper or plastic wrap to prevent a film from forming on the surface.
7 – Cut tops off and fill with 2 1/2 tablespoons custard; replace tops and drizzle with 1 tablespoon chocolate sauce. Serve immediately.
8 – Storage: Store baked unfilled cream puff shells in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Use within 24 hours or freeze up to 2 months.
NOTES:
Fluffy pastry shells filled with a thick vanilla custard and drizzled with chocolate sauce.

Recipe Yield: Yield: 12 ServingsServing Size: 1 cream puff

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 200
Fat: 9 grams
Saturated Fat: 4.5 grams
Fiber: 1 grams
Sodium: 180 milligrams
Cholesterol: 120 milligrams
Protein: 6 grams
Carbohydrates: 24 grams
Sugars: 12 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/vanilla-cream-puffs

Diabetic Dessert of the Week – Lemon Mini Tarts

April 30, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dessert of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is – Lemon Mini Tarts. To make this week’s recipe you’ll be needing Powdered Sugar, Egg Yolks, Butter, Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice, Lemon Peel, Granulated Sugar, Frozen Phyllo Shells, Mint Leaves, and Raspberries. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Lemon Mini Tarts
Craving something sweet? With fewer than 10 simple ingredients and less than 20 minutes of preparation time, you can have these delicious homemade mini tarts ready for dessert tonight.

Ingredients
1/2 cup powdered sugar
2 egg yolks
3 tablespoons butter, melted
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tablespoon lemon peel
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
24 mini frozen phyllo shells*
Mint leaves (optional)
Raspberries (optional)

Directions
Yield: 12 servings
Serving size: 2 tarts

1 – Heat oven to 350°F. Whisk powdered sugar, egg yolks, butter, lemon juice, lemon peel, and granulated sugar in small bowl until well blended.

2 – Spoon 1 teaspoon filling into each frozen phyllo shell. Bake about 13 to 15 minutes or until centers are set.

3 – Garnish each tart with 1 mint leaf and 1 raspberry, if desired.

*Note. Frozen phyllo shells can be found in the freezer section by the other frozen hors d’oeuvres.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 162 calories, Carbohydrates: 20 g, Protein: 2 g, Fat: 8 g, Saturated Fat: 3 g, Cholesterol: 66 mg, Sodium: 62 mg, Fiber: 0 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/desserts-sweets/lemon-mini-tarts/

 

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Christmas Dishes – Eggnog

December 16, 2015 at 9:12 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 5 Comments
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Eggnog with cinnamon

Eggnog with cinnamon

Eggnog, or egg nog (About this sound pronunciation (help·info)), also known as egg milk punch, is a chilled, sweetened, dairy-based beverage traditionally made with milk and/or cream, sugar, whipped eggs (which gives it a frothy texture) and spirits such as brandy, rum or bourbon. The finished serving is often garnished with a sprinkling of ground cinnamon or nutmeg. Eggnog with a strong alcohol content keeps well, and is often considered to improve when aged for up to a year (refrigeration is recommended). Eggnog is often provided to guests in a large punch bowl, from which cups of eggnog are ladled.

Eggnog is traditionally consumed throughout Canada and the United States from American Thanksgiving through the end of the Christmas seasons every year. Eggnog or eggnog flavoring may also be added as to food or drink, such as coffee (e.g. an “Eggnog Latte” espresso drink) and tea. Eggnog as a custard can also be used as an ice cream flavor base.

 

 
Traditional eggnog is made of milk or cream, sugar, raw eggs, an alcoholic spirit, and spices, often vanilla or nutmeg. Some modern commercial eggnogs add gelatin and other thickeners, with less egg and cream. There are variations in ingredients, and toppings may be added.

Eggnog can be made commercially, as well as domestically. Ready-made eggnog versions are seasonally available with different spirits, or without alcohol, to be drunk as bought or used as “mixes” with all the ingredients except the liquor, to be added as desired.

Traditional eggnog has a significant fat and sugar content; low-fat and sugar-free formulations are available using skimmed or low fat milk.

Dutch advocaat with around 20% alcohol, long sold in bottles, is essentially an eggnog. Under current U.S. law, commercial products sold as eggnog are permitted to contain milk, sugar, modified milk ingredients, glucose-fructose, water, carrageenan, guar gum, natural and artificial flavorings, spices, monoglycerides, and colorings. Ingredients vary significantly between variants.

Eggnog can be served as a homemade beverage or purchased from stores. Homemade eggnog was traditionally made with raw eggs. In the 2000s, some recipes call for the homemade eggnog mixture to be heated to a safe temperature during its preparation, to protect from eggs that may be contaminated with salmonella. Eggnog made with contaminated eggs that are not heated is not safe, despite the presence of alcohol.

 

 

"Silk Nog," a commercial soy milk eggnog.

“Silk Nog,” a commercial soy milk eggnog.

Some North American manufacturers offer soy-, almond-, rice- or coconut-milk-based alternatives for vegans and those with dairy allergies.

The history of non-dairy eggnogs goes back to at least 1899 when Almeda Lambert, in her Guide for Nut Cookery, gave a recipe for “Egg Nog” made using coconut cream, eggs, and sugar.

In 1973, Eunice Farmilant, in The Natural Foods Sweet-Tooth Cookbook, gave a more modern non-dairy eggnog recipe using 3 eggs separated, 2 tablespoons of barley malt extract or Amasake syrup, 4 cups of chilled soy milk, 1 teaspoon of vanilla extract, and nutmeg, (p. 138-39)

In December 1981, Grain Country of Los Angeles, California, introduced Grain Nog, the earliest known non-dairy and vegan eggnog. Based on amazake (a traditional Japanese fermented rice beverage) and containing no eggs, it was available in plain, strawberry, and carob flavors.

Also in December 1981, Redwood Valley Soyfoods Unlimited (California) introduced Soynog, the earliest known soy-based non-dairy and vegan eggnog based on soy milk and tofu (added for thickness). It was renamed Lite Nog in 1982 and Tofu Nog in 1985.

 

 
Some recipes for homemade eggnog call for egg yolks to be cooked with milk into a custard to avoid potential hazards from raw eggs. (Some of these recipes call for any liquor used to be added beforehand, in the belief that the alcohol will evaporate during cooking.) Eggnog has much in common with classic custard-pudding recipes that do not call for cornstarch, and many types of eggnog can also be cooked into egg-custard puddings, or churned into eggnog-flavored ice cream.

 

Condiment of the Week – Aioli

December 3, 2015 at 5:55 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | 2 Comments
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* Starting this week is Condiment of the Week, replacing the Pepper of the Week. Thanks to Wiki and other various sites for all info. Hope you enjoy!

 
Aioli

Aioli of garlic, salt, egg, and olive oil in a mortar

Aioli of garlic, salt, egg, and olive oil in a mortar

Alioli or aïoli (/aɪˈoʊli/ or /eɪˈoʊli/; Provençal Occitan: alhòli [aˈʎɔli] or aiòli [aˈjɔli]; Catalan: allioli [ˌaʎiˈɔɫi]) is a Provençal sauce made of garlic, olive oil, egg yolks, and lemon juice. There are many variations, such as excluding egg yolk or lemon juice, or adding other seasonings. It is usually served at room temperature. The name aioli (alhòli) comes from Provençal alh ‘garlic’ (< Latin allium) + òli ‘oil’ (< Latin oleum).

Aioli is, like mayonnaise, an emulsion or suspension of small globules of oil and oil-soluble compounds in water and water-soluble compounds. Egg yolk can be used as an emulsifier and is generally used in making aioli today. However, mustard and garlic both emulsify oil, and some variants such as Valencia allioli, and Maltese aljoli omit the egg.

Since the late 1980s, it has become fashionable to call all flavored mayonnaises “aioli”, with flavorings such as saffron, chili, and so on. But purists insist that “flavored mayonnaise can contain garlic, but true aïoli contains no seasoning but garlic”.
Garlic is crushed in a mortar and pestle and emulsified with egg yolks, salt, and olive oil, then lemon juice is added. Today, aioli is often made in a food processor or blender, but traditionalists object that this does not give the same result.

 

Aioli with olives

Aioli with olives

In Occitan cuisine, aioli is typically served with seafood, fish soup, and croutons, in a dish called merluça amb alhòli. In Malta, arjoli or ajjoli is commonly made with the addition of either crushed galletti or tomato. In the Occitan Valleys of Italy it is served with potatoes boiled with salt and bay laurel.

In Provence, aioli or, more formally, le grand aïoli, aioli garni, or aïoli monstre also designates a complete dish consisting of various boiled vegetables (usually carrots, potatoes, artichokes, and green beans), poached fish (normally soaked salt cod), snails, canned tuna, other seafood, and boiled eggs, served with the aioli sauce. Other commonly used vegetables are beets, fennel, celery, zucchini, cauliflower, chick peas, and raw tomato.

This dish is often served during the festivities on the feast days of the patron saint of Provençal villages and towns. It is traditional to serve it with snails for Christmas Eve and with cod on Ash Wednesday.

Aïoli is so strongly associated with Provence that when the poet Frédéric Mistral started a regionalist, Provençal-language, newspaper in 1891, he called it L’Aiòli.

 

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