Lunch Meat of the Week – Capocollo

November 29, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Lunch Meat of the Week | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Capocollo

Capocollo (Italian pronunciation: [kapoˈkɔllo]), coppa ([ˈkoppa]), or capicola is a traditional Italian and Corsican pork cold cut (salume) made from the dry-cured muscle running from the neck to the fourth or fifth rib of the pork shoulder or neck. It is a whole-muscle salume, dry cured, and typically sliced very thin. It is similar to the more widely known cured ham or prosciutto, because they are both pork-derived cold-cuts used in similar dishes. However, it is not brined as ham typically is.

In its production, capocollo is first lightly seasoned often with red and sometimes white wine, garlic, and a variety of herbs and spices that differs depending on region. The meat is then salted (and was traditionally massaged) and stuffed into a natural casing, and hung for up to six months to cure. Sometimes the exterior is rubbed with hot paprika before being hung and cured. Capocollo is essentially the pork counterpart of the air-dried, cured beef bresaola. It is widely available wherever significant Italian communities occur, due to commercially produced varieties. The slow-roasted Piedmontese version is called coppa cotta.

Capocollo is esteemed for its delicate flavor and tender, fatty texture, and is often more expensive than most other salumi. In many countries, it is often sold as a gourmet food item. It is usually sliced thin for use in antipasto or sandwiches such as muffulettas, Italian grinders and subs, and panini’ as well as some traditional Italian pizza.

Two particular varieties, Coppa Piacentina and Capocollo di Calabria, have Protected Designation of Origin status under the Common Agricultural Policy of European Union law, which ensures that only products genuinely originating in those regions are allowed in commerce as such.

Slices of Capocollo di Martina Franca served with figs.

Five additional Italian regions produce capicollo, and are not covered under European law, but are designated as “Prodotto agroalimentare tradizionale” by the Italian Ministry of Agricultural, Food, and Forestry Policies:

* Capocollo della Basilicata
* Capocollo del Lazio
* Capocollo di Martina FrancaIt is a traditional capocollo of Apulia. It is smoked with laurel leaves, thyme, almonds, Mediterranean herbs and pieces of bark of Macedonian Oak (called fragno in Italian), a tree typical of Southeastern Italy, Balkans and Western Turkey. Usually it is served with figs.
* Capocollo tipico senese (finocchiata or finocchiona, from Toscana)
* Capocollo dell’Umbria

Outside Italy, capocollo is traditionally produced also in the French island of Corsica under the names of coppa or capicollu.[14] Coppa di Corsica/de Corse is also a PDO product. It was introduced to Argentina by Italian immigrants, under the names bondiola or bondiola curada.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Cathryn's Kitchen

A Plant Powered Gluten-Free Kitchen

heidicooksplants.wordpress.com/

Making everyday food delicious!

Rita's Kitchen Remedies

Easy vegan food remedies to cure your hunger

Foodzesty

Simple, Scrumptious, Delicious Recipes

Crazy Rice Kitchen

Indian recipes, restaurant reviews, and the occasional helpful guide to the culinary arts.

Jono & Jules do food & wine

Two foodies and lovers of wine in Dublin.

rosauerskitchen.wordpress.com/

Spread a little aloha around the inland northwest

Life With A Baker

our journey to discovering living a healthy lifestyle

Erin, Get Your Pen

Writing, Teaching, and Life in Stitches

The Tipsy Housewife

Inspiration for Domestication

Gitta's Kitchen

Simple and delicious recipes for your family!

The Rose Table

Savoring life's pleasures.

Blood, Fire and the Pillars of Smoke

Live Fire Cooking & More

To all the meals I've cooked before

An open love letter to all the meals I've lovingly prepared and enjoyed

midwestsimple

Just another WordPress.com site

SouthernVegan

Recipes and tips to help fellow vegans survive and thrive in the South.

It's Thyme to Eat!

A Poor PhD Student's Guide to Making Delicious Food