Yummy Diabetes-Friendly Salad Recipes

April 22, 2016 at 4:45 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | 1 Comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website it’s Yummy Diabetes-Friendly Salad Recipes. Diabetic Friendly recipes that include; Buffalo Chicken Salad, Clementine-Arugula Salad with Lime-Poppy Seed Dressing, and Maple Mahi Mahi Salad. You can see allof them on the Diabetic Living Online website, enjoy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Yummy Diabetes-Friendly Salad RecipesDiabetic living logo

Salads don’t have to mean sacrifice with this bunch of mouthwatering, flavor-packed recipes. Plus, they’re each filling enough to make into a main dish.

 

 

Buffalo Chicken Salad

Need a healthful meal in a flash? This low-carb salad has the spicy kick and satisfying crunch of your favorite restaurant-style Buffalo chicken without the extra calories and fat. And it only takes 15 minutes to toss together…..

 
Clementine-Arugula Salad with Lime-Poppy Seed Dressing

This citrus-infused side salad will surely be a hit around the dinner table. Plus, it takes less than 20 minutes to make and boasts only 14 grams of carb per serving….

 
Maple Mahi Mahi Salad

You won’t need to fish for compliments when you serve this main-dish salad that’s packed with protein, healthy fats, and fiber. They’ll be begging for the recipe before the meal is over…….

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Yummy Diabetes-Friendly Salad Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/salad/yummy-diabetes-friendly-salad-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Stuffing

February 1, 2016 at 5:55 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Stuffed turkey

Stuffed turkey

Stuffing, filling or dressing is an edible substance or mixture, often a starch, used to fill a cavity in another food item while cooking. Many foods may be stuffed, including eggs, poultry, seafood, mammals, and vegetables.

Turkey stuffing often consists of dried bread, in the form of croutons, cubes or breadcrumbs, pork sausage meat, onion, celery, salt, pepper, and other spices and herbs such as summer savoury, sage, or a mixture like poultry seasoning. Giblets are often used. Popular additions in the United Kingdom include dried fruits and nuts (notably apricots and flaked almonds), and chestnuts.

 
It is not known when stuffings were first used. The earliest documentary evidence is the Roman cookbook, Apicius De Re Coquinaria, which contains recipes for stuffed chicken, dormouse, hare, and pig. Most of the stuffings described consist of vegetables, herbs and spices, nuts, and spelt (an old cereal), and frequently contain chopped liver, brains, and other organ meat.

Names for stuffing include “farce” (~1390), “stuffing” (1538), “forcemeat” (1688), and relatively more recently in the United States; “dressing” (1850).

 

 

Stuffed Parasol mushroom

Stuffed Parasol mushroom

In addition to stuffing the body cavity of animals, including birds, fish, and mammals, various cuts of meat may be stuffed after they have been deboned or a pouch has been cut into them. Popular recipes include stuffed chicken legs, stuffed pork chops, stuffed breast of veal, as well as the traditional holiday stuffed turkey or goose.

Many types of vegetables are also suitable for stuffing, after their seeds or flesh has been removed. Tomatoes, capsicums (sweet or hot peppers), vegetable marrows (e.g., zucchini) may be prepared in this way. Cabbages and similar vegetables can also be stuffed or wrapped around a filling. They are usually blanched first, in order to make their leaves more pliable. Then, the interior may be replaced by stuffing, or small amounts of stuffing may be inserted between the individual leaves.

It is sometimes claimed that the ancient Roman, as well as medieval, cooks stuffed animals with other animals. An anonymous Andalusian cookbook from the 13th century includes a recipe for a ram stuffed with small birds. A similar recipe for a camel stuffed with sheep stuffed with bustards stuffed with carp stuffed with eggs is mentioned in T.C. Boyle’s book Water Music.

British celebrity chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall has championed the ten-bird roast, calling it “one of the most spectacular and delicious roasts you can lay before your loved ones at Yuletide”. A large turkey is stuffed with a goose, duck, mallard, guinea fowl, chicken, pheasant, partridge, pigeon, and woodcock. The roast feeds approximately 30 people and, as well as the ten birds, includes stuffing made from two pounds of sausage meat and half a pound of streaky bacon, along with sage, and port and red wine.

In the United States and Eastern Canada, multi-bird dishes are sometimes served on special occasions. See gooducken and turducken.

 

 

Stuffed orange pepper

Stuffed orange pepper

Almost anything can serve as a stuffing. Many popular Anglo-American stuffings contain bread or cereals, usually together with vegetables, herbs and spices, and eggs. Middle Eastern vegetable stuffings may be based on seasoned rice, on minced meat, or a combination thereof. Other stuffings may contain only vegetables and herbs. Some types of stuffing contain sausage meat, or forcemeat, while vegetarian stuffings sometimes contain tofu. Roast pork is often accompanied by sage and onion stuffing in England; roast poultry in a Christmas dinner may be stuffed with sweet chestnuts. Oysters are used in one traditional stuffing for Thanksgiving. These may also be combined with mashed potatoes, for a heavy stuffing. Fruits and dried fruits can be added to stuffing including apples, apricots, dried prunes,and raisins. In England, a stuffing is sometimes made of minced pork shoulder seasoned with various ingredients, sage, onion, bread, chestnuts, dried apricots, dried cranberries etc. The stuffing mixture may be cooked separately and served as a side dish. This may still be called stuffing or it may be called dressing.

 
The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) states that cooking animals with a body cavity filled with stuffing can present potential food safety issues. These can occur because when the meat reaches a safe temperature, the stuffing inside can still harbor bacteria (and if the meat is cooked until the stuffing reaches a safe temperature, the meat may be overcooked). For turkeys, for instance, the USDA recommends cooking stuffing/dressing separately from the bird and not buying pre-stuffed birds. (Stuffing is never recommended for turkeys to be fried, grilled, microwaved, or smoked).

 

Get-Skinny Salads

May 28, 2015 at 5:20 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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Nothing like a good salad! From the EatingWell website it’s Get-Skinny Salads. Check out the EatingWell website to find all kinds of delicious and healthy recipes. http://www.eatingwell.com/

 
Get-Skinny Salads
Satisfying low-calorie salad recipes to help you lose weight.EatingWell2
Healthy salads don’t need to be skimpy! Low-calorie recipes like Kale Salad with Bacon-Blue Cheese Vinaigrette and Salmon & Roasted Vegetable Salad are deliciously hearty and satisfying. Packed with flavorful ingredients, these healthy salad recipes are perfect for weeknight dinners. And many of these low-calorie recipes, including healthy pasta salad recipes, egg salad recipes and more, lend themselves well to being packed for lunch the next day.

 

 

Kale Salad with Bacon-Blue Cheese Vinaigrette
Hot roasted potatoes in this healthy kale salad recipe wilt the kale just enough to make it tender. Bacon and blue cheese layer on smoky, salty flavors to stand up to the flavor of the kale. Go for a strong blue cheese—we enjoy the tanginess of Maytag. Serve this salad with steak or chicken……

 

 

Chopped Ham & Apple Salad with Creamy Parmesan Dressing
This healthy main-course chopped salad recipe pairs bitter escarole and radicchio with sweet apple, smoky ham and crunchy pecans. But the pairing possibilities are limitless—you can also use cooked chicken and tangerines instead of ham and apples or bell pepper in place of the radishes. Serve with pumpernickel bread toasted with extra-sharp Cheddar cheese….

 

 

Salmon & Roasted Vegetable Salad
Toss roasted vegetables and salmon with a flavor-packed vinaigrette to serve on top of greens for a hearty dinner salad. For a twist, add a poached or fried egg on top. Serve with: Toasted whole-grain baguette and a glass of Riesling……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Get-Skinny Salads

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/get_skinny_salads

One of America’s Favorites – Ranch Dressing

May 25, 2015 at 5:40 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Homemade ranch dressing

Homemade ranch dressing

Ranch dressing is a type of salad dressing made of some combination of buttermilk, salt, garlic, onion, herbs (commonly chives, parsley, and dill), and spices (commonly black pepper, paprika, and ground mustard seed), mixed into a sauce based on mayonnaise or another oil emulsion. Sour cream and yogurt are sometimes used as a substitute by some home cooks or to create a lower-fat version. Ranch dressing has been the best-selling salad dressing in the United States since 1992, when it overtook Italian dressing. It is also popular as a dip.

 

 

In the early 1950s, Steve Henson developed what is now known as ranch dressing while working as a plumbing contractor for three years in the remote Alaskan bush. In 1954, he and his wife Gayle opened Hidden Valley Ranch, a dude ranch near Santa Barbara, California, where they served it to the guests. It became popular, and they began selling it in packages for guests to take home, both as a finished product and as packets of seasoning to be mixed with mayonnaise and buttermilk. They incorporated Hidden Valley Ranch Food Products, Inc. and opened a factory to manufacture it in larger volumes, distributed first to supermarkets in the Southwest, and later nationally. In October 1972, the Hidden Valley Ranch brand was bought by Clorox for $8 million.

Kraft Foods and General Foods began selling similar dry seasoning packets labeled as “ranch style”. This resulted in a trademark infringement lawsuit against both from the Waples-Platter Companies, the Texas-based manufacturer of Ranch Style Beans (now part of ConAgra Foods), even though Waples-Platter had declined to enter the salad dressing market itself out of fear that the tendency of such products to spoil rapidly would damage its brand. The case was tried before federal judge Eldon Brooks Mahon in Fort Worth, Texas, in 1976. Judge Mahon ruled in favor of Waples-Platter in a lengthy opinion which described the various “ranch style” and “ranch” products then available, of which many had been created to compete against Hidden Valley Ranch. Judge Mahon specifically noted that Hidden Valley Ranch and Waples-Platter had no dispute with each other (though he also noted that Hidden Valley Ranch was simultaneously suing General Foods in a separate federal case in California). The only issue before the Texas federal district court was that Waples-Platter was disputing the right of other manufacturers to compete against Hidden Valley Ranch by using the label “ranch style”.

Meanwhile, Clorox reformulated the Hidden Valley Ranch dressing several times to try to make it more convenient for consumers. The first change was to include buttermilk flavoring in the seasoning so that it required adding standard milk rather than buttermilk. In 1983, Clorox developed a more popular non-refrigerated bottled formulation. As of 2002, Clorox subsidiary Hidden Valley Ranch Manufacturing LLC produces ranch packets and bottled dressings at two large factories, in Reno, Nevada, and Wheeling, Illinois.

During the 1980s, ranch became a common snack food flavor, starting with Cool Ranch Doritos in 1987, and Hidden Valley Ranch Wavy Lay’s in 1994.

During the 1990s Hidden Valley had three kid-oriented variations of ranch dressing: pizza, nacho cheese and taco flavors.

 

 

Ranch dressing is common in the United States as a dip for vegetables such as broccoli and carrots, as well as for chips and “bar foods” such as french fries and chicken wings. It is also a common dipping sauce for fried foods such as fried mushrooms, fried zucchini, jalapeno poppers, onion rings, chicken fingers, and hushpuppies. In addition, ranch dressing is used on pizza, pickles, baked potatoes, wraps, tacos, pretzels, and hamburgers.

While popular in the United States and Canada, ranch dressing is virtually unknown in many parts of the world. In places where ranch seasoning is used to flavor snack foods, the flavor may be described as “American” flavor.

Ranch dressing is produced by many manufacturers, including Hidden Valley, Ken’s, Kraft, Marie’s, Newman’s Own, and Wish-Bone.

 
* Just one of many Ranch Dressing Recipes on the web. This one is from the allrecipes website. http://allrecipes.com/

Ranch Dressing

INGREDIENTS:All Recipes
1 cup mayonnaise
1/2 cup sour cream
1/2 teaspoon dried chives
1/2 teaspoon dried parsley
1/2 teaspoon dried dill weed
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/4 teaspoon onion powder
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
DIRECTIONS:
1. – In a large bowl, whisk together the mayonnaise, sour cream, chives, parsley, dill, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate for 30 minutes before serving.

http://allrecipes.com/Recipe-Tools/Print/Recipe.aspx?recipeID=16131&origin=detail&servings=12&metric=false

One of America’s Favorites – Caesar Salad

February 23, 2015 at 6:24 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 4 Comments
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A Caesar salad

A Caesar salad

A Caesar salad is a salad of romaine lettuce and croutons dressed with Parmesan cheese, lemon juice, olive oil, egg, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, and black pepper. It is often prepared table side.

 

 

The salad’s creation is generally attributed to restaurateur Caesar Cardini, an Italian immigrant who operated restaurants in Mexico and the United States. Cardini was living in San Diego but also working in Tijuana where he avoided the restrictions of Prohibition. His daughter Rosa (1928–2003) recounted that her father invented the dish when a Fourth of July 1924 rush depleted the kitchen’s supplies. Cardini made do with what he had, adding the dramatic flair of the table-side tossing “by the chef.” A number of Cardini’s staff have said that they invented the dish.

Julia Child said that she had eaten a Caesar salad at Cardini’s restaurant when she was a child in the 1920s. The earliest contemporary documentation of Caesar Salad is from a 1946 Lawry’s The Prime Rib (Los Angeles, California) restaurant menu, twenty-two years after the 1924 origin attributed to the Cardinis.

 

 

A simple Caesar salad

A simple Caesar salad

The original Caesar salad recipe (unlike his brother Alex’s Aviator’s salad) did not contain pieces of anchovy; the slight anchovy flavor comes from the Worcestershire sauce. Cardini was opposed to using anchovies in his salad.

In the 1970s, Cardini’s daughter said that the original recipe included whole lettuce leaves, which were meant to be lifted by the stem and eaten with the fingers; coddled eggs; and Italian olive oil.

Bottled Caesar dressings are now produced and marketed by many companies.

The trademark brands, “Cardini’s”, “Caesar Cardini’s” and “The Original Caesar Dressing” are all claimed to date to February 1950, though they were only registered decades later, and more than a dozen varieties of bottled Cardini’s dressing are available today. Some recipes include mustard, avocado, tomato, bacon bits, garlic cloves or anchovies. Cardini’s Brand original Caesar dressing is somewhat different from Rosa’s version.

 

 

One of the most common Caesar salad variations, shown here topped with grilled chicken

One of the most common Caesar salad variations, shown here topped with grilled chicken

Many variations of the salad exist; for example, by topping a Caesar salad with grilled chicken, steak, or seafood. Certain Mexican restaurants may improvise on items such as substituting tortilla strips for croutons or Cotija cheese for the Parmesan.

Ingredients
Common ingredients in many recipes:

* romaine or cos lettuce
* olive or vegetable oil
* fresh crushed garlic
* salt to taste
* fresh-ground black pepper
* lemon or lime juice – fresh squeezed
* Worcestershire sauce
* raw or coddled egg yolks
* freshly grated Parmesan cheese
* freshly prepared croutons

Variations
There are limitless variations. However, some of the more common are:

* other varieties of lettuce
* grilled poultry (most often chicken), meat, shellfish, or fish
* capers
* Romano cheese
* anchovies
* bacon

 

 

 

There is inherent risk of infection by salmonella bacteria occasionally found in raw egg from cracked or improperly washed eggshells. This is a concern with many similar dressings that are emulsified with eggs, though generally the pH level is thought to be acidic enough to kill those bacteria. Nevertheless, later versions of the recipe call at least for briefly cooked coddled eggs or pasteurized eggs. Recipes may omit the egg and produce a “Caesar vinaigrette”. Many variations of this salad exist; yogurt is sometimes substituted for the eggs to maintain a creamy texture and others call for using mayonnaise, oil and vinegar.

 

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Hot Turkey Sandwiches

December 26, 2014 at 6:29 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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Here’s a delicious and healthy way to use all those leftovers after the Christmas Feast. It’s this week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week, Hot Turkey Sandwiches! It uses your leftover JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Oven Roasted Turkey Breast and Mashed Potatoes. Nothing like leftovers the Jennie – O way! http://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Hot Turkey SandwichesHot Turkey Sandwiches
Ingredients
½ cup cranberry sauce
4 slices sourdough bread, toasted
1 pound thinly sliced JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Oven Roasted Turkey Breast, heated
1 cup mashed potatoes, heated
1 cup prepared stuffing, heated
½ cup turkey gravy, heated

 
Directions
Spread cranberry sauce on bread slices. Place turkey over cranberry sauce. Top turkey with mashed potatoes and stuffing. Pour gravy over potatoes and stuffing
Nutritional InformationJennie O Make the Switch
Calories 350 Fat 6g
Protein 19g Cholesterol 25mg
Carbohydrates 57g Sodium 990mg
Fiber 3g Saturated Fat 1g
Sugars 15g

 
http://www.jennieo.com/recipes/431-Hot-Turkey-Sandwiches

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

May 22, 2014 at 5:41 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Add some flavor and make your dressings healthier with this tip; for rich, creamy dressings made healthy, substitute half the mayo with Greek-style yogurt. You’ll be a fan of this one!

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