National Doughnut Day 2017 in United States of America – Friday, June 2

June 2, 2017 at 11:35 AM | Posted in baking | Leave a comment
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National Doughnut Day was established in 1938 by the Chicago Salvation Army to honor women who served doughnuts to soldiers during World War I. The holiday is traditionally celebrated on the first Friday of June.

 

 

 

* Dunkin’ Donuts: At participating Dunkin’ Donuts, get a free classic doughnut of your choice with the purchase of any beverage all day Friday while supplies last. Go here to find a Dunkin’ Donuts near you.

* Krispy Kreme: Get one free doughnut of your choice, no purchase necessary at participating locations. Go here to learn more and find participating shops.

It’s Nuts I tell you…….RECIPE FOR DONUT MIX

November 3, 2016 at 5:39 AM | Posted in nuts, NUTS COM | Leave a comment
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This week from the nuts.com website (https://nuts.com/) it’s a Recipe for Donut Mix. Make your own Donuts, a healthier Donut, from home with this week’s recipe! It’s made using Donut Mix that you can purchase on the NUTS site (https://nuts.com/). The Nuts site is home to healthy snacks, recipes, and gifts. Including items; NUTS, DRIED FRUIT, CHOCOLATES and SWEETS, COFFEE and TEA, COOKING and BAKING, and more! With the Holiday season fast approaching make sure you check out their Gift Selections (https://nuts.com/gifts/). Most items can be purchased in small amounts or in bulk. There’s also Everyday Free Shipping* on orders over $59, see for details. Now more on the Recipe for Donut Mix.

 

 

RECIPE FOR DONUT MIXNUTS1

Recipe Ingredients:
3/4lb Donut Mix
2/3 cup Water
2/3 tbsp Yeast

Cooking Directions:
1. Combine yeast & water, let sit 5 minutes. Add Donut Mix and knead dough for 4 to 6 minutes till soft and smooth. Let rise 45 to 60 minutes.
2. Roll out and cut desired shapes. Let rise till double in size.
3. Fry at 375 for approximately 1 minute per side.
4. Yields approximately 1 dozen.
https://nuts.com/recipes/donut-mix.html

 

donut-mix

Donut Mix
Skip the donut shop and have your own freshly made raised donuts at home. A 1 lb. bag of our donut mix yields approximately 12 donuts
https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/mixes/cake/donut.html

 

 
Order securely online or call us:nuts products
800-558-6887 or 908-523-0333
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Diabetes-Friendly Blueberry Recipes

April 12, 2016 at 4:48 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website (http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/) its Diabetes-Friendly Blueberry Recipes. Blueberries are a great add on to cereal, yogurt, smoothies, or your fresh baked muffins! You’ll find recipes including Berry Tart with Lemon Cookie Crust, Nectarine-Blueberry Crisp, and Gluten-Free Blueberry-Lemon Donuts. Find them all at the Diabetic Living Online website.

 
Diabetes-Friendly Blueberry RecipesDiabetic living logo

We look for any excuse to incorporate juicy, antioxidant-rich blueberries into our breakfasts, desserts, and snacks. Whether fresh or frozen, the tiny-but-mighty fruits are delicious tossed into your cereal or yogurt, blended into healthy smoothies, or baked into muffins, cakes, and bars. Here are our best diabetic recipes featuring one of the sweetest power foods: blueberries.

 

 

Berry Tart with Lemon Cookie Crust

Fluffy filling and fresh berries adorn this delicious diabetic dessert. To ease the assembly of the blueberry cake, make the crust ahead of time……

 
Nectarine-Blueberry Crisp

This nectarine and blueberry crumble is perfect for spring and summer, when both fruits are in season. One serving of the pistachio-topped treat contains only 166 calories……

 
Gluten-Free Blueberry-Lemon Donuts

For a gluten-free breakfast option, try our scrumptious blueberry donuts. With just 19 grams of carb per serving, they won’t make you feel guilty for indulging!…..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Diabetes-Friendly Blueberry Recipes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/diabetes-friendly-blueberry-recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Doughnut

December 28, 2015 at 5:53 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A glazed yeast-raised ring doughnut

A glazed yeast-raised ring doughnut

A doughnut or donut (/ˈdoʊnət/ or /ˈdoʊnʌt/; see spelling differences) is a type of fried dough confectionery or dessert food. The doughnut is popular in many countries and prepared in various forms as a sweet snack that can be homemade or purchased in bakeries, supermarkets, food stalls, and franchised specialty outlets. Doughnuts are usually deep-fried from a flour dough, and typically either ring-shaped or without a hole, and often filled. Other types of batters can also be used, and various toppings and flavorings are used for different types, such as sugar, chocolate, or maple glazing. In addition to flour, doughnuts may also include such ingredients as water, leavening, eggs, milk, sugar, oil/shortening, natural flavors and/or artificial flavors.

The two most common types are the toroidal ring doughnut and the filled doughnut—which is injected with fruit preserves, cream, custard, or other sweet fillings. A small spherical piece of dough may be cooked as a doughnut hole. Other shapes include rings, balls, and flattened spheres, as well as ear shapes, twists and other forms. Doughnut varieties are also divided into cake and risen type doughnuts.

 

 
Shapes
Rings
Ring doughnuts are formed by joining the ends of a long, skinny piece of dough into a ring or by using a doughnut cutter, which simultaneously cuts the outside and inside shape, leaving a doughnut-shaped piece of dough and a doughnut hole from dough removed from the center. This smaller piece of dough can be cooked or added back to the batch to make more doughnuts. A disk-shaped doughnut can also be stretched and pinched into a torus until the center breaks to form a hole. Alternatively, a doughnut depositor can be used to place a circle of liquid dough (batter) directly into the fryer.

There are two types of ring doughnuts, those made from a yeast-based dough for raised doughnuts or made from a special type of cake batter. Yeast-raised doughnuts contain about 25% oil by weight, whereas cake doughnuts’ oil content is around 20%, but they have extra fat included in the batter before frying. Cake doughnuts are fried for about 90 seconds at approximately 190 °C (374 °F) to 198 °C (388 °F), turning once. Yeast-raised doughnuts absorb more oil because they take longer to fry, about 150 seconds, at 182 °C (359 °F) to 190 °C (374 °F). Cake doughnuts typically weigh between 24 g and 28 g (0.85 oz to 0.99 oz), whereas yeast-raised doughnuts average 38 g (1.34 oz) and are generally larger, and taller (due to rising) when finished.

Topping
After frying, ring doughnuts are often topped. Raised doughnuts are generally covered with a glaze (icing). Cake doughnuts can also be glazed, or powdered with confectioner’s sugar, or covered with cinnamon and granulated sugar. They are also often topped with cake frosting (top-side only) and sometimes sprinkled with coconut, chopped peanuts, or sprinkles (also called jimmies).

Holes

A variety of doughnuts

A variety of doughnuts

Doughnut holes are small, bite-sized doughnuts that were traditionally made from the dough taken from the center of ring doughnuts. Before long, doughnut sellers saw the opportunity to market “holes” as a novelty and many chains offer their own variety, some with their own brand names such as “Munchkins” from Dunkin’ Donuts and “Timbits” from Tim Hortons.

Traditionally, doughnut holes are made by frying the dough removed from the center portion of the doughnut. Consequently, they are considerably smaller than a standard doughnut and tend to be spherical. Similar to standard doughnuts, doughnut holes may be topped with confections, such as glaze or powdered sugar.

Originally, most varieties of doughnut holes were derivatives of their ring doughnut (yeast-based dough or cake batter) counterparts. However, doughnut holes can also be made by dropping a small ball of dough into hot oil from a specially shaped nozzle or cutter. This production method has allowed doughnut sellers to produce bite-sized versions of non-ring doughnuts, such as filled doughnuts, fritters and Dutchies.

Filled
The filled doughnut is a flattened sphere injected with fruit preserves, cream, custard, or other sweet fillings, and often dipped into powdered sugar or topped off with frosting. Common varieties include the Boston cream, coconut, key lime, and jelly.

Other shapes
Others include the fritter and the Dutchie, which are usually glazed. These have been available on Tim Hortons’ doughnut menu since the chain’s inception in 1964, and a 1991 Toronto Star report found out that these two were the chain’s most popular type of fried dough in Canada.

There are many other specialized doughnut shapes such as old-fashioned, bars or Long Johns (a rectangular shape), or with the dough twisted around itself before cooking. In the northeast U.S., bars and twists are usually referred to as crullers. Another is the beignet, which is square-shaped, covered with powdered sugar.

 

 

 

Glazed doughnuts rolling on a conveyor belt at a Krispy Kreme doughnut shop

Glazed doughnuts rolling on a conveyor belt at a Krispy Kreme doughnut shop

Doughnuts have a disputed history. One theory suggests they were invented in North America by Dutch settlers, and in the 19th century, doughnuts were sometimes referred to as one kind of oliekoek (a Dutch word literally meaning “oil cake”), a “sweetened cake fried in fat.”

Hanson Gregory, an American, claimed to have invented the ring-shaped doughnut in 1847 aboard a lime-trading ship when he was 16 years old. Gregory was dissatisfied with the greasiness of doughnuts twisted into various shapes and with the raw center of regular doughnuts. He claimed to have punched a hole in the center of dough with the ship’s tin pepper box, and to have later taught the technique to his mother. Smithsonian Magazine states that his mother, Elizabeth Gregory, “made a wicked deep-fried dough that cleverly used her son’s spice cargo of nutmeg and cinnamon, along with lemon rind,” and “put hazelnuts or walnuts in the center, where the dough might not cook through”, and called the food ‘doughnuts’.

According to anthropologist Paul R. Mullins, the first cookbook mentioning doughnuts was an 1803 English volume which included doughnuts in an appendix of American recipes. By the mid-19th century, the doughnut looked and tasted like today’s doughnut, and was viewed as a thoroughly American food.

Another theory on their origin came to light in 2013, appearing to predate all previous claims, when a recipe for “dow nuts” was found in a book of recipes and domestic tips written in 1800 by the wife of Baron Thomas Dimsdale, the recipe being given to the dowager Baroness by an acquaintance who transcribed for her the cooking instructions of a local delicacy, the “Hertfordshire nut”.

 

 
National Doughnut Day, also known as National Donut Day, celebrated in the United States of America, is on the first Friday of June each year, succeeding the Doughnut Day event created by The Salvation Army in 1938 to honor those of their members who served doughnuts to soldiers during World War I. About 250 Salvation Army volunteers went to France. Because of the difficulties of providing freshly baked goods from huts established in abandoned buildings near the front lines, the two Salvation Army volunteers (Ensign Margaret Sheldon and Adjutant Helen Purviance) came up with the idea of providing doughnuts. These are reported to have been an “instant hit”, and “soon many soldiers were visiting The Salvation Army huts”. Margaret Sheldon wrote of one busy day: “Today I made 22 pies, 300 doughnuts, 700 cups of coffee.” Soon, the women who did this work became known by the servicemen as “Doughnut Dollies”.

 

 
Frosted, glazed, powdered, Boston cream, coconut, sour cream, cinnamon, chocolate, and jelly are some of the varieties eaten in the United States and Canada. Sweetening, filling, and fancy toppings are now so common that plain doughnuts are now commonly labeled and sold as “old fashioned”.

There are also potato doughnuts (sometimes referred to as spudnuts). Doughnuts are ubiquitous in the United States and can be found in most grocery stores, as well as in specialty doughnut shops.

A popular doughnut in Hawaii is the malasada. Malasadas were brought to the Hawaiian Islands by early Portuguese settlers, and are a variation on Portugal’s filhós. They are small eggy balls of yeast dough deep-fried and coated in sugar.

Immigrants have brought various doughnut varieties to the United States. To celebrate Fat Tuesday in eastern Pennsylvania, churches sell a potato starch doughnut called a Fastnacht (or Fasnacht). The treats are so popular there that Fat Tuesday is often called Fastnacht Day. The Polish doughnut, the pączki, is popular in U.S. cities with large Polish communities such as Chicago, Milwaukee, and Detroit.

In regions of the country where apples are widely grown, especially the Northeast and Midwest states, cider doughnuts are a harvest season specialty, especially at orchards open to tourists, where they can be served fresh. Cider doughnuts are a cake doughnut with apple cider in the batter. The use of cider affects both the texture and flavor, resulting in a denser, moister product. They are often coated with either granulated or powdered sugar or cinnamon sugar.

In Southern Louisiana, a popular variety of the doughnut is the beignet, a fried, square doughnut served traditionally with powdered sugar. Perhaps the most famous purveyor of beignets is New Orleans restaurant Cafe Du Monde.

In Quebec, homemade doughnuts called beignes de Noël are traditional Christmas desserts.

 

 

Chocolate-frosted doughnut

Chocolate-frosted doughnut

Within the United States, the Providence metropolitan area was cited as having the most donut shops per capita (25.3 doughnut shops per 100,000 people) as of January 13, 2010.

National Doughnut Day celebrates the doughnut’s history and role in popular culture. There is a race in Staunton, Illinois, featuring doughnuts, called Tour de Donut.

In film, the doughnut has inspired Dora’s Dunking Doughnuts (1933), The Doughnuts (1963) and Tour de Donut: Gluttons for Punishment. In video games, the doughnut has appeared in games like The Simpsons Game and Donut Dilemma. In the cartoon Mucha Lucha, there are four things that make up the code of mask wrestling: honor, family, tradition, and doughnuts. Also, in the popular television sitcom The Simpsons, Homer Simpson’s love affair with doughnuts makes a prominent ongoing joke as well as the focal point of more than a few episodes. There is also a children’s book Arnie the Doughnut and music albums The Doughnut in Granny’s Greenhouse and Desert Doughnuts.

In several media, doughnuts are frequently presented as enjoyed by police officers during coffee break. This cliché has been parodied in the film Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol, where Officer Zed is instructing new recruits how to “properly” consume their doughnut with coffee. It is also parodied in the television series Twin Peaks, where the police station is always in large supply. In the video game Neuromancer there is a Donut World shop, where only policemen are allowed. During a city-wide “lockdown” after the Boston Marathon bombings, a handful of selected Dunkin’ Donuts locations were ordered to remain open to serve police and first responders despite the closing of the vast majority of city businesses.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Dessert

January 26, 2015 at 6:31 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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A flourless chocolate cake (torte)

A flourless chocolate cake (torte)

Dessert (/dɨˈzɜrt/) is a typically sweet course that concludes an evening meal. The course usually consists of sweet foods, but may include other items.

 

In world cultures there are a wide variety of desserts including cakes, tarts, cookies, biscuits, gelatins, pastries, ice creams, pies, puddings, custards, sweet soups and candies. Fruit is also commonly found in dessert courses because of its naturally occurring sweetness. Many different cultures have their own variations of similar desserts around the world, such as in Russia, where many breakfast foods such as blint, oladi, and syrniki can be served with honey and jam to make them popular as desserts. The loosely defined course called dessert can apply to many foods.
The word “dessert” originated from the French word desservir “to clean the table” and the negative of the Latin word servire.
Desserts were first made using natural ingredients that were locally available. In ancient civilizations people enjoyed dried fruits, honeycomb, or nuts. These were considered the first candies. When sugar began to be manufactured in the Middle Ages more sweet desserts became available. Even then sugar was so expensive usually only the wealthy could indulge on special occasions. Ice cream can be dated back to 3000BC and may be considered to be an early “dessert” in the modern sense of the word. The first apple pie recipe was printed in 1381. Also in 1740 the first cupcake recipes were recorded. Ice cream was a Chinese invention although Marco Polo expanded the technique to Europe in his travels. By the 1800s, recipes for how to make ice cream were very popular. Vanilla also plays a large role in many desserts including ice cream. Vanilla was mostly grown in Mexico where they discovered if the vanilla pod was picked and dried then vanillin was produced which can be sweetened into a dessert on its own.

 

Spices can vary the taste of desserts and add flavor

Spices can vary the taste of desserts and add flavor

Desserts are constantly changing with the new techniques and ingredients available at the time or in the local area. They have changed from natural candies and nuts to complex souffles and multi-layered cakes. The ingredients available affect the range of desserts that can be made in each region. The first desserts required minimal effort or preparation since ancient cultures were more focused on the nutrition in foods in order to survive. Now, however, modern-day cultures have more options in the desserts available. Ice Cream went from being a shaved ice substance with flavoring to the dairy based, sweet treat modern children crave. Desserts also went through a major change in manufacturing. The Industrial Revolution in America and Europe changed desserts (and food in general) because they began to be mass-produced, processed, preserved, canned, and packaged. The iconic foods soon became a staple in many households because of their availability. Frozen foods became very popular starting in the 1920s when freezing emerged. Also around the 1920s lunch counters and fast food restaurants were established with increasing popularity. These processed foods became a huge part of diets in many industrialized nations. Food has always varied with each culture and area, and, despite the boom in mass-produced processed desserts, they have still represented regional and ethnic cultures. Many countries have desserts and foods distinctive to their nations or region. One example of this is the churro historically from Spain. These sticks of dough are now deep-fried. They are available all throughout North and South America along with many other areas. They started with Spanish shepherds as a substitute for bread. Now they have been passed through generations and cultures and changed to a sweet confection different for each culture.

 
Desserts usually contain sugar or a sweetening agent. Desserts contain a range of ingredients which makes the end product differ. Some of the more common ingredients in desserts are flour, dairy, eggs, and spices. Sugar gives many desserts their “addictive sweetness” and contributes to their moisture and tenderness. The flour or starch component in most desserts serves as a protein and gives the dessert structure. Different flours such as All-Purpose Flour or Pastry Flour provide a less rigid gluten network and therefore a different texture. Flour desserts may also contain dairy products. Different desserts use flour to various degrees. Desserts like ice cream and puddings have some form of dairy as their main ingredient, whereas desserts like cakes and cookies have relatively small amounts. The dairy products in baked goods keep the desserts moist. Many desserts also contain eggs, in order to form custard or to aid in the rising and thickening of a cake-like substance. Egg yolks specifically contribute to the richness of desserts. Egg whites can act as a leavening agent when the proteins uncoil and expand. Desserts can contain many different spices and extracts to add a variety of flavors. One example of this is salt. Salt is added to desserts to balance sweet flavors and create a contrast in flavors. All these ingredients contribute to desserts and make them different.
Dessert can come in variations of flavors, textures, and looks. Desserts can be defined as a usually sweeter course that concludes a meal. This definition includes a range of courses anywhere from fruits or dried nuts to multi-ingredient cakes and pies. With the many different varieties of desserts the many cultures have different variations. In modern times the variations of desserts have usually been passed down or come from geographical regions. This is one cause for the variation of desserts. These are some major categories in which desserts can be placed.

 

A glazed yeast-raised ring doughnut

A glazed yeast-raised ring doughnut

Cakes- Cakes are sweet tender breads made with sugar and delicate flour. Cakes can vary from light, airy sponge cakes to dense cakes with less flour. In addition, small-sized cakes have become popular in the form of cupcakes and petits fours.
* Chocolates and candies- Many candies involve the crystallization of sugar which varies the texture of sugar crystals. Candies can be found in many different forms including caramel, marshmallows, and taffy.
* Cookies- Cookies are similar to cakes (the word coming from the Dutch word koekje meaning little cake). Historically cookies were small spoonfuls of cake batter placed in the oven to test the temperature. Cookies can come in many different forms. Examples include layered bars, crispy meringues, and soft chocolate chip cookies.
* Custards and puddings- These kinds of sweets usually include a thickened dairy base. Custards are cooked and thickened with eggs. Baked custards can include crème brûlée and flan. Puddings are thickened with starches.
* Donuts-Donuts are a sweet that can be considered a breakfast or dessert. It is considered a deep-fried dessert made from flour. It is the shape of a circle, and sometimes has a hole in the center. There are two-types of donuts: ring-shaped with the circle in the middle, and filled. A filled donut differs from a ring-shaped donut as it is often filled with fruit preserves, cream, custard or other sweet fillings. Square-shaped donuts are commonly referred to as fritters.Fritters are fried and consist of batter or breading that is often filled with fruit, or other ingredients. Fritters are made up of eggs, milk, batter, deep or pan-fried, wheat flour, cornmeal, or a mix of two can make the batter. Donuts can be homemade or found at bakeries, grocery stores, and speciality outlets. Krispy Kreme and Dunkin Donuts are two well-known donut companies that are known for their ring-shaped and filled donuts. In May 2013, the cronut was introduced by Dominique Ansel at the Dominique Ansel Bakery in New York City. It is best described as a donut and croissant combined. Cronuts are shaped in a circle and sometimes have a hole in the center. It is dough that is sugared, filled and glazed. Donuts are not always in the shape of a circle; some other shapes of donuts include twists, rings, and balls.

* Frozen desserts- ice cream and gelato both fit into this category. Ice cream is a cream base that is churned as it is frozen to create a creamy consistency, while gelato uses a milk base and has less air than ice cream. Thirdly, sorbet is made from churned fruit and is not dairy based.

* Pastries- Pastries can either take the form of light and flaky bread with an airy texture or unleavened dough with a high fat content. Pastries can be eaten with fruits, chocolates, or other sweeteners and are often eaten with tea.
* Pies- Pies and cobblers are a crust with a filling. The crust can be either made from either a pastry or crumbs. The fillings can be anything from fruits to puddings.
* Miscellaneous desserts- Many desserts cannot be categorized such as cheesecake. Though cheesecake is a similar to a custard, it is named “cake”. Many desserts can span the categories and several don’t fit in a category at all.
Desserts are by definition a sweet course. This usually means high content of sugar or fats. Desserts have historically been known as a smaller course to end a meal but in modern times they have become a more major part of people’s diets. Although desserts are sweet a small amount of sugar is recommended in a daily diet. Certain desserts such as dark chocolate, that have a lower sugar content, are popularly considered healthier because of their other nutritional content. One example of a healthier dessert is fresh fruit cooked without sugars or extra fats.

 

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