Diabetic Dish of the Week – ALASKA SALMON CAKES WITH YOGURT DILL SAUCE

April 23, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is ALASKA SALMON CAKES WITH YOGURT DILL SAUCE. Made using Cottage Cheese, Fresh Dill, Green Onions, 2 cans of Alaska Salmon, Yogurt, and Dill. The Dish is 217 calories and 8 carbs per serving. The recipe is from one of my favorite sites the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. The site has a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes so check it out today. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

ALASKA SALMON CAKES WITH YOGURT DILL SAUCE
Ingredients
1 egg
1/4 cup small-curd nonfat cottage cheese
1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill or 1 teaspoon dried dill weed
1 teaspoon lemon pepper seasoning
1/4 cup sliced green onions
1 can (14.75 ounces) traditional pack Alaska salmon or 2 cans or pouches (6 to 7.1 ounces each) skinless, boneless salmon, drained and chunked
3 tablespoons garlic-and-herb bread crumbs
Vegetable oil

Yogurt Dill Sauce
Yogurt Dill Sauce Ingredients
1/2 cup nonfat yogurt
1 1/2 teaspoons finely minced fresh garlic
Salt and pepper
1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill or 1 teaspoon dried dill weed
1/4 cup grated cucumber (squeeze dry)

Directions
1 – In medium bowl, whisk egg lightly. Add cottage cheese, dill, lemon pepper and green onions; mix well.
2 – Mix in drained salmon, then sprinkle in bread crumbs and mix well.
3 – Shape mixture into 4 patties, 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick and 3 inches in diameter.
4 – Heat nonstick skillet over medium-high heat and brush skillet with oil.
5 – Fry salmon cakes for about 2-1/2 to 3 minutes per side.
6 – Cakes should be crisp and golden on the outside and still moist on the inside.

To Make Yogurt Dill Sauce:
1 – Mix yogurt and garlic, and add salt and pepper to taste. Stir in dill and cucumber. Refrigerate, covered, until ready to serve.
Recipe Yield: Serves 4

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 217
Fat: 8 grams
Sodium: 897 milligrams
Cholesterol: 112 milligrams
Protein: 27 grams
Carbohydrates: 8 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/alaska-salmon-cakes-with-yogurt-dill-sauce

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Baked Salmon w/ Long Grain and Wild Rice and Whole Baby Carrots

January 16, 2017 at 5:54 PM | Posted in carrots, fish, salmon, Uncle Ben's Rice | 3 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Baked Salmon w/ Long Grain and Wild Rice and Whole Baby Carrots

 

 
For Breakfast this morning it was Hash Browns, Smoked Turkey Sausage, Toast, and Decaf Green Tea. I had went tobaked-salmon-w-wild-and-long-grain-rice-and-whole-baby-carrots-007 Meijer and they finally had the Simply Potatoes Shredded Hash Browns back in stock! It had been a few weeks since any store had them in stock. So I prepared the Hash Browns and then I prepared a 1/2 Sausage link of the Butterball Hardwood Smoked Turkey Sausage. Added a slice of toasted Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread and a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea, and that’s a Breakfast! Big change in the weather again! 50 degrees for a high with rain on and off all day, beats in the teens and snow! So with not a lot going on outside I did some cleaning on the inside. I cleaned and straightened the pantry and the the freezer and refrigerator. For Dinner tonight I prepared Baked Salmon w/ Long Grain and Wild Rice and Whole Baby Carrots.

 
I had purchased the Salmon Fillet last week from Meijer and had it in the freezer. Grabbed the fillet out of the freezerBaked Salmon w Baked Potato and Whole Baby Carrots 001 and let it thaw overnight in the fridge. To prepare it, I rinsed it off with cold water and patted it dry with a paper towel. I preheated the oven on 400 degrees. I seasoned it with McCormick’s Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn and some Dried Dill. Sprayed a small baking pan with Pam w/ Olive Oil Spray and added the Salmon Fillet. Baked it on 400 degrees until the Salmon was fork tender, about 12 minutes total. I love Salmon as I do all Fish and Seafood. The Salmon came out delicious, nicely seasoned and moist. I just love all Fish and Seafood.

 

 

 

baked-salmon-w-wild-and-long-grain-rice-and-whole-baby-carrots-001
To go worth the Salmon I microwaved a bag of Uncle Ben‘s Ready Rice – Long Grain and Wild. I guess my favorite among the Uncle Ben’s Ready Rice, all though I love using them all. Another tasty and easy to fix item, just microwave for 90 seconds and it’s ready.

 

 

 

 

 

Buffalo Tenderloin-Tips w Noodles and Whole Baby Carrots 011
Then I also heated up a can of Kroger Brand Whole Baby Carrots. These are so much easier to prepare than boiling fresh Baby Carrots, and they taste just as fresh and good. I also baked a loaf of Pillsbury French Bread. Then for Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salmon Fillet raw

Salmon /ˈsæmən/ is the common name for several species of fish in the family Salmonidae. Other fish in the same family include trout, char, grayling and whitefish. Salmon are native to tributaries of the North Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. Wikipedia

 

 

 

 

 
UNCLE BEN’S® READY RICE® Long Grain & Wild

The rice that’s always ready to enjoy. Now, you can have our original delicious Long Grain & Wild Rice recipe with 23 herbs and seasonings in just 90 seconds. This microwaveable pouch also eliminates prep and cleanup. UNCLE BEN’S®. ‘Perfect Every Time’®.

Nutritional Claims & Product Benefits:Uncle Ben's Long-Grain-Wild
* Good Source of Folic Acid
* Good source of iron
* 0 g Trans Fats & No Saturated Fat
COOKING INSTRUCTIONS
Squeeze pouch to separate rice.
Tear to vent.
Heat on HIGH for 90 seconds.
Cooking time for 2 pouches – 2 ½ minutes. Microwave times may vary. Take care when handling and opening the hot pouch. Refrigerate unused portion.

In the Skillet
Gently squeeze the sides of the pouch to break apart the rice, and pour contents into a skillet. Add 2 Tbsp. of water and heat.
Stir rice occasionally until heated thoroughly.
Serve immediately.
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 cup (125 g)
Per Serving % Daily Value*
Calories 190
Calories from Fat 18
Total Fat 2.0g 3%
Saturated Fat 0.0g 0%
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 630mg 26%
Carbohydrates 39.0g 13%
Dietary Fiber 2.0g 8%
Sugars 1.0g
Protein 5.0g
http://www.unclebens.com/Products/Ready-Rice/Uncle-Ben-s-reg;-Long-Grain-Wild#.UhpZ6hvOk20

Baked Atlantic Salmon Fillet w/ Roasted Asparagus and Whole Grain Brown Rice

May 25, 2015 at 5:04 PM | Posted in salmon, Uncle Ben's Rice | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Atlantic Salmon Fillet w/ Roasted Asparagus and Whole Grain Brown Rice

 

Baked Atlantic Salmon Fillet  Assparagus Rice 004

Happy Memorial Day to all our Military Men currently serving and protecting our Country and to all the fallen heroes that lost their lives protecting our Country. It’s been a cloudy one here, hot and humid with rain on and off. Had a grilled Ham, Egg, and Cheese Sandwich to start my day off with. So not much going on, did a little house cleaning inside and outside and that was about it. For dinner tonight I prepared a Baked Atlantic Salmon Fillet w/ Roasted Asparagus and Whole Grain Brown Rice.

 

 

Baked Atlantic Salmon Fillet  Assparagus Rice 001
I picked the Atlantic Wild Caught Salmon up at Kroger yesterday, they had some beautiful fillets! To prepare it I rubbed it with a light coat of Extra Virgin Olive Oil and seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn and Dill. I preheated the oven on 400 degrees. Then got a small roasting pan and sprayed that with Pam Cooking Spray. Baked until it was fork tender, about 12 minutes. The Salmon was delicious! Very moist, fresh tasting, and seasoned just like I like it.

 

 

 

To go with the Salmon I prepared some Roasted Asparagus and Whole Grain Brown Rice. To prepare the Asparagus Roasted Asparagus 2I just needed Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Cloves Garlic (minced), Sea Salt, Freshly grated Black Peppercorn, Lemon Juice, and Shredded Parmesan Cheese. To prepare it; Rinse clean the asparagus. Break the tough ends off of the asparagus and discard. Lay the asparagus spears out in a single layer in a baking dish or a foil-covered roasting pan. Drizzle olive oil over the spears, roll the asparagus back and forth until they are all covered with a thin layer of olive oil. Sprinkle with minced garlic, salt, and pepper. Rub over the asparagus so that they are evenly seasoned. Place pan in the preheated 400 degree oven and roast for approximately 8-10 minutes, depending on how thick your asparagus spears are, until lightly browned and tender when pierced with a fork. Drizzle with a little fresh lemon juice and shredded Parm Cheese before serving. I roasted these at the same time I was baking the Salmon.

 

 

 

Then for another side I prepared some Uncle Ben’s Whole Grain Brown Ready Rice. Comes in a microwave ready pouch, just heat for 90 seconds and serve! For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Greek Yogurt.

 

 

 

MEMORIAL DAY

Herb and Spice of the Week – Dill

September 11, 2014 at 5:26 AM | Posted in Herb and Spice of the Week | Leave a comment
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Dill (Anethumgraveolens) is an annual herb in the celery family Apiaceae. It is the sole species of the genus Anethum.

Dill plants

Dill plants

Dill grows to 40–60 cm (16–24 in), with slender hollow stems and alternate, finely divided, softly delicate leaves 10–20 cm (3.9–7.9 in) long. The ultimate leaf divisions are 1–2 mm (0.039–0.079 in) broad, slightly broader than the similar leaves of fennel, which are thread like, less than 1 mm (0.039 in) broad, but harder in texture. The flowers are white to yellow, in small umbels 2–9 cm (0.79–3.54 in) diameter. The seeds are 4–5 mm (0.16–0.20 in) long and 1 mm (0.039 in) thick, and straight to slightly curved with a longitudinally ridged surface.

 
Fresh and dried dill leaves (sometimes called “dill weed” to distinguish it from dill seed) are widely used as herbs in Europe and central Asia.

Like caraway, the fernlike leaves of dill are aromatic and are used to flavor many foods such as gravlax (cured salmon) and other fish dishes, borscht and other soups, as well as pickles (where the dill flower is sometimes used). Dill is best when used fresh as it loses its flavor rapidly if dried; however, freeze-dried dill leaves retain their flavor relatively well for a few months.

Dill seed, having a flavor similar to caraway but also resembling that of fresh or dried dill weed, is used as a spice. Dill oil is extracted from the leaves, stems and seeds of the plant. The oil from the seeds is distilled and used in the manufacturing of soaps.

Dill is the eponymous ingredient in dill pickles: cucumbers preserved in salty brine and/or vinegar.

 
Successful cultivation requires warm to hot summers with high sunshine levels; even partial shade will reduce the yield substantially. It also prefers rich, well-drained soil. The seeds are viable for three to ten years.

The seed is harvested by cutting the flower heads off the stalks when the seed is beginning to ripen. The seed heads are placed upside down in a paper bag and left in a warm, dry place for a week. The seeds then separate from the stems easily for storage in an airtight container.

 

Sunday Morning Breakfast!

May 18, 2014 at 9:23 AM | Posted in breakfast, Eggs, hash browns, Spam | 2 Comments
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Spam Hash Browns Eggs Skillet 004

Good morning from the chilly confines we cal West Chester, Ohio! Only 39 degrees to start out this morning. Made a hot and delicious Breakfast to heat it up a bit. I prepared a Turkey Spam, Hash Browns, and Egg Skillet.

 

 
Tried Spam for the first time a few months ago and I’ve been having it regular ever since. Started with the Spam Light and now I use the Turkey Spam, it has fewer calories and carbs than any of the other varieties. Using a small skillet I heated it up on medium heat, adding 1 tablespoon of Extra Virgin Olive Oil to the pan. After it was heated I added my Hash Browns, Simply Potatoes Brand, and seasoned them with Sea Salt, Pepper, and Dried Dill. Flipped them over after about 6 minutes, reseasoned and added my Turkey Spam. I had cut off one serving of the Spam and diced it before adding it to the pan. As that was finishing up in another small skillet I fried one Medium size Egg, Sunny Side Up that I seasoned with Sea Salt and Pepper. As the Egg was almost done I added into the other skillet on top of the Hash Browns and Spam. Served it with a hot cup of brewed Bigelow Decaf Green Tea and my Sunday Morning Papers and enjoyed Breakfast!

Fall Harvest: Pumpkins

October 14, 2013 at 8:19 AM | Posted in vegetables | 2 Comments
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Pumpkins are the most common winter squash and come into season in September in most areas.

Several large pumpkins

Several large pumpkins

Pumpkin refers to certain cultivars of squash, most commonly those of Cucurbita pepo, that are round, with smooth, slightly ribbed skin and deep yellow to orange coloration. The thick shell contains the seeds and pulp. Some exceptionally large cultivars of squash with similar appearance have also been derived from Cucurbita maxima. Specific cultivars of winter squash derived from other species, including C. argyrosperma, and C. moschata, are also sometimes called “pumpkin”. In Australian English, the term “pumpkin” generally refers to the broader category called winter squash elsewhere.
Pumpkins, like other squash, are native to North America. Pumpkins are widely grown for commercial use, and are used both in food and recreation. Pumpkin pie, for instance, is a traditional part of Thanksgiving meals in the United States, although commercially canned pumpkin puree and pumpkin pie fillings are usually made from different kinds of winter squash than the pumpkins frequently carved as jack o’lanterns for decoration around Halloween.
Pumpkins, like other squash, are thought to have originated in North America. The oldest evidence, pumpkin-related seeds dating between 7000 and 5500 BC, were found in Mexico.
Since some squash share the same botanical classifications as pumpkins, the names are frequently used interchangeably. One often used botanical classification relies on the characteristics of the stems: pumpkin stems are more rigid, prickly, and angular (with an approximate five-degree angle) than squash stems, which are generally softer, more rounded, and more flared where joined to the fruit.

Traditional C. pepo pumpkins generally weigh between 6 and 18 pounds (2.7 and 8.2 kg), though the largest cultivars (of the species C. maxima) regularly reach weights of over 75 pounds (34 kg).
The color of pumpkins is derived from the orange pigments abundant in them. The main nutrients are lutein and both alpha and beta carotene, the latter of which generates vitamin A in the body.
The largest pumpkins are Cucurbita maxima. They were cultivated from the hubbard squash genotype, crossed with kabocha-pumpkin types by enthusiast farmers through intermittent effort since the early 19th century. As such germplasm is commercially provocative, a U.S. legal right was granted for the rounder phenotypes, levying them as constituting a variety, with the appellation Atlantic Giant. Eventually, this phenotype graduated back into the public domain, except now it had the name Atlantic Giant on its record (see USDA PVP # 8500204).
Weigh-off competitions for giant pumpkins are a popular festival activity. The world record held at 459 pounds (208 kg) until 1981, when Howard Dill (of Nova Scotia) broke the record with a pumpkin weighing 493.5 pounds (223.8 kg). Dill patented the seeds used to grow this giant pumpkin, deeming them Dill’s Atlantic Giant seeds, and drawing growers from around the world. Dill is credited for all of the giant pumpkins today, most of which are borne from crossing and re-crossing his patented seed with other varieties. By 1996, giant pumpkins had crossed the 1,000-pound (450 kg) mark. The current world record holder is Ron Wallace’s 2,009.0-pound (911.3 kg) Atlantic Giant pumpkin, which in September 2012 surpassed Jim and Kelsey Bryson’s previous 2011 record of 1,818.5 pounds (824.9 kg).

Pumpkin pie is a popular way of preparing pumpkin.

Pumpkin pie is a popular way of preparing pumpkin.

Pumpkins are very versatile in their uses for cooking. Most parts of the pumpkin are edible, including the fleshy shell, the seeds, the leaves, and even the flowers. In the United States and Canada, pumpkin is a popular Halloween and Thanksgiving staple. Pumpkin purée is sometimes prepared and frozen for later use.
When ripe, the pumpkin can be boiled, baked, steamed, or roasted. In its native North America, it is a very important, traditional part of the autumn harvest, eaten mashed and making its way into soups and purees. Often, it is made into pie, various kinds of which are a traditional staple of the Canadian and American Thanksgiving holidays. In Canada, Mexico, the United States, Europe and China, the seeds are often roasted and eaten as a snack.
Pumpkins that are still small and green may be eaten in the same way as squash or zucchini. In the Middle East, pumpkin is used for sweet dishes; a well-known sweet delicacy is called halawa yaqtin. In South Asian countries such as India, pumpkin is cooked with butter, sugar, and spices in a dish called kadu ka halwa. Pumpkin is used to make sambar in Udupi cuisine. In Guangxi province, China, the leaves of the pumpkin plant are consumed as a cooked vegetable or in soups. In Australia and New Zealand, pumpkin is often roasted in conjunction with other vegetables. In Japan, small pumpkins are served in savory dishes, including tempura. In Myanmar, pumpkins are used in both cooking and desserts (candied). The seeds are a popular sunflower seed substitute. In Thailand, small pumpkins are steamed with custard inside and served as a dessert. In Italy, it can be used with cheeses as a savory stuffing for ravioli. Also, pumpkin can be used to flavor both alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages.
In the southwestern United States and Mexico, pumpkin and squash flowers are a popular and widely available food item. They may be used to garnish dishes, and they may be dredged in a batter then fried in oil. Pumpkin leaves are a popular vegetable in the Western and central regions of Kenya; they are called seveve, and are an ingredient of mukimo, respectively, whereas the pumpkin itself is usually boiled or steamed. The seeds are popular with children who roast them on a pan before eating them.
Commercially canned “pumpkin” puree and pumpkin pie fillings are often made with winter squashes other than the traditionally defined pumpkin, such as butternut squash.
Pumpkin seeds, also known as pepitas, are small, flat, green, edible seeds. Most pumpkin seeds are covered by a white husk, although some pumpkin varieties produce seeds without them. Pumpkin seeds are a popular snack that can be found hulled or semi-hulled at most grocery stores. However, roasting pumpkin seeds (usually scooped out of jack-o-lanterns) is a popular Halloween treat. Per ounce serving, pumpkin seeds are a good source of protein, magnesium, copper and zinc.

A can of pureed pumpkin, typically used as the main ingredient in pumpkin pie.

A can of pureed pumpkin, typically used as the main ingredient in pumpkin pie.

Canned pumpkin is often recommended by veterinarians as a dietary supplement for dogs and cats that are experiencing certain digestive ailments such as constipation, diarrhea, or hairballs. The high fiber content helps to aid proper digestion.
Raw pumpkin can be fed to poultry, as a supplement to regular feed, during the winter to help maintain egg production, which usually drops off during the cold months.
Pumpkin phytochemicals and nutrients remain under preliminary research for potential biological effects.
Pumpkins are commonly carved into decorative lanterns called jack-o’-lanterns for the Halloween season in North America. Throughout Britain and Ireland, there is a long tradition of carving lanterns from vegetables, particularly the turnip, mangelwurzel, or swede. The turnip has traditionally been used in Ireland and Scotland at Halloween, but immigrants to North America used the native pumpkin, which are both readily available and much larger – making them easier to carve than turnips. Not until 1837, does jack-o’-lantern appear as a term for a carved vegetable lantern, and the carved pumpkin lantern association with Halloween is recorded in 1866.
In the United States, the carved pumpkin was first associated with the harvest season in general, long before it became an emblem of Halloween. In 1900, an article on Thanksgiving entertaining recommended a lit jack-o’-lantern as part of the festivities that encourage kids and families to join together to make their own jack-o’-lanterns.

Baked Chicken Thighs w/ Asparagus Medley, Rice, and…

August 28, 2013 at 5:16 PM | Posted in baking, chicken, mushrooms, vegetables | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Baked Chicken Thighs w/ Asparagus Medley, Rice, and Baked Harvest Grain BreadBaked Thighs and Asparagus Medley 002

 

 

 
I laid 3 Chicken Thighs in the fridge overnight to thaw. I’ve been wanting some Chicken Thighs so tonight I prepared Baked Chicken Thighs w/ Asparagus Medley, Rice, and Baked Harvest Grain Bread.

 

 

To prepare the Chicken Thighs I placed them in a single layer in a shallow baking dish. You can sprinkle the chicken thighs with whatever seasonings you like such as Italian seasoning, lemon pepper, thyme or rosemary and garlic, I used Rosemary, Thyme, Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, and Garlic Powder. Covered with foil and baked for 20 minutes at 350 degrees F. Then removed the foil and continued cooking for an additional 10 to 15 minutes or until the internal temperature of the chicken thigh reached 165 degrees F. Good, simple, and quick way to prepare some tasty Chicken Thighs.

 

 

For a side dish to go with my Chicken Thighs I prepared a new dish, Asparagus Medley. Nothing but good things in this one! It’s got Asparagus (Trimmed), 2 Sweet Peppers (Red or Yellow) Julienned, 1/4 cup fresh sliced Mushrooms, 1/2 small can of Sliced Black Olives (Drained), 1/2 Garlic Clove (Minced), 1 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1/4 tsp. Minced fresh Parsley, and seasoned with Sea Salt, Pepper, Lemon-Pepper, and Dill Weed to taste. You know me the easier to prepare the better and this one is easy! In a bowl add and combine the vegetables, Olives, and Garlic, drizzle with Oil and toss to coat. Then sprinkle with the Parsley, Salt, Pepper, Lemon- Pepper, and Dill Weed; to taste. Then just Saute in a skillet or wok over medium heat until all vegetables are crisp tender; and serve. This turned out to be one fine and healthy side dish! The Asparagus was nice and crisp, the Peppers added great flavor and crunch, and the seasoning was spot on. Good Keeper recipe.

 

 

I also baked a Loaf of Kroger Bakery Harvest Grain Bread. For dessert later a Dole Mini Banana and perhaps some Apple Slices.

 

 

 

 
Asparagus MedleyBaked Thighs and Asparagus Medley 001

Makes 2 Servings

1/4 lb. Asparagus, Trimmed
2 Sweet Peppers (Red or Yellow), Julienned
1/4 cup fresh sliced Mushrooms
1/2 small can of Sliced Black Olives (Drained)
1/2 Garlic Clove, Minced
1 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1/4 tsp. Minced fresh Parsley
Sea Salt, Pepper, Lemon-Pepper, and Dill Weed to taste

 
Instructions:

* In a bowl add and combine the vegetables, Olives, and Garlic, drizzle with Oil and toss to coat.
* Then sprinkle with the Parsley, Salt, Pepper, Lemon- Pepper, and Dill Weed; to coat
* Then Saute in a skillet or wok over medium heat until all vegetables are crisp tende; and serve.

Pickled Dill Carrots

May 27, 2013 at 1:22 PM | Posted in carrots | Leave a comment
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Came across this recipe in the current issue of the Food Network Magazine, Pickled Dill Carrots. It sounded and looked great so today I made some for myself. They have to refrigerated for at least 24 hours so I’ll let you know how they taste sometime tomorrow. I substituted the Medium Carrots, and slicing them, with Mini Carrots and also I used Splenda Sugar instead of the regular Sugar  . I left the recipe along with a web link to the Food Network website.

 

Pickled Dill CarrotsPickled Dill carrots 003

Ingredients
7 medium carrots (about 1 1/4 pounds), sliced 1/4 inch thick
4 sprigs dill
3/4 cup white wine vinegar
1/3 cup sugar
Kosher salt
1 teaspoon dill seeds
1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds
Coarsely ground pepper

 

 

Directions
Bring a medium pot of water to a boil. Add the carrots and cook until crisp-tender, about 1 minute. Drain and rinse under cold water until cool. Pack the carrots and dill sprigs into a 1-quart jar.

Make the brine: Combine the vinegar, 3/4 cup water, the sugar, 2 1/2 teaspoons salt, the dill seeds, caraway seeds and 1/4 teaspoon pepper in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil.

Pour the hot brine into the jar and let cool completely. Cover and refrigerate overnight or up to 1 week.

 

Read more at: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/food-network-kitchens/pickled-dill-carrots-recipe/index.html?oc=linkback

Tis the Season!

May 8, 2012 at 10:03 AM | Posted in Food, spices and herbs, vegetables | Leave a comment
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Time to get started on the garden! Peppers, Green Onions, Lettuce, and Herbs. I’ll be growing Basil, Oregano, Dill, Parsley, and Chives this year. Nothing like homegrown.

Buttermilk Ranch Chicken w/ Diced potatoes, Green Beans and…

November 13, 2011 at 7:11 PM | Posted in chicken, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, greenbeans, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, low calorie, low carb, potatoes | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Buttermilk Ranch Chicken w/ Diced potatoes, Green Beans and Whole Grain Bread


I tried another Rachael Ray recipe for dinner tonight, Buttermilk Ranch Chicken. A real easy and delicious recipe to put together. The Chicken is marinated in a mixture of Buttermilk, Mayo, Dried Mustard, fresh Chives, Dried Dill, Salt andpepper. I used Lowfat Buttermilk and Kraft Reduced Mayonnaise. You can marnate it from 45 minutes to overnight, I marinated mine for 3 hours. They came out moist and flavorful. I left the recipe at the end of the post.

For sides I had Green Beans, Bob Evans Diced Seasoned Potatoes, and Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. For dessert a Yoplait 100 Calorie Delight Chocolate Eclair Parfait.

Buttermilk Ranch Chicken
By: Every Day With Rachael Ray Staff

Ingredients:

1 cup buttermilk
1/2 cup mayonnaise
1/2 tsp. dried mustard
1 tbsp. chopped fresh chives
1/2 tsp. dried dill
Salt and pepper
4 thin-cut chicken breast cutlets
2 tbsp. oil

Directions:

Combine all ingredients up to oil; marinate 45 minutes (or overnight). In large nonstick skillet, heat oil over medium heat; brown cutlets on both sides until cooked through, about 7 minutes.

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