Kitchen Hint of the Day!

October 26, 2017 at 5:05 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Batter up………

When making a batter for foods for deep-frying, try adding 1/2 teaspoon baking powder for every 1/2 cup flour. The coating will be lighter.

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

July 16, 2014 at 5:21 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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A few tips on Deep Frying, thanks to Ben for passing these along!

* Avoid crowding food that is deep-fat-fried. The food must be surrounded by bubbling oil, and you must keep the temperature from falling too much. If you add too much food to a small amount of oil, the temperature will plummet, and the food will wind up greasy and soggy.

 

* Never fill the pot more than halfway with oil; this will prevent bubbling over when the food is added.

 

* Dry food well with paper towels before adding to the pot; it helps reduce splattering.

Five Safety Tips for Deep Frying Turkey

November 25, 2013 at 9:50 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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A very good artlicle on Deep Frying Turkey, from the PBS web site. I left the link at the end of the post. While there check their Food Section out, full of good recipes and tips!

 

PBS

 

When it comes to deep frying turkey, you want to take every precaution to keep your family and your home safe. For the best suggestions, we went to an expert – a fire chief!

By Chief Fire Marshal Mike Julazadeh of the Charleston Fire Department of South Carolina

Fried turkeys are delicious, but they come with a slew of safety issues. Thousands of fires as well as many deaths and injuries happen each year due to turkey fryer fires. Before you set up your turkey fryer this Thanksgiving, remember these safety tips.

Get the Tips

Stay Away from The House – Set up the turkey fryer more than 10 feet away from your home and keep children and pets away. Never leave it unattended.

Find Flat Ground – The oil must be even and steady at all times to ensure safety. Place the fryer on a flat, level surface and carefully gauge the amount of oil needed.

Use a Thawed and Dry Turkey – Make sure your Thanksgiving turkey is completely thawed and dry. Extra water will cause the oil to bubble furiously and spill over. If oil spills from the fryer onto the burner, it can cause a fire.

Monitor the Temp – Use caution when touching the turkey fryer. The lid and handle can become very hot and could cause burns. Also be sure to keep track of the oil’s temperature as many fryers do not have their own thermostats.

Be Prepared – Have a fire extinguisher (multipurpose, dry-powder) ready at all times in the event that the oil ignites….

 

 

http://www.pbs.org/food/features/five-safety-tips-for-deep-frying-turkey/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=pbsofficial&utm_campaign=pbsfood_thanksgiving

One of America’s Favorites – the Corn Dog

September 4, 2012 at 2:13 PM | Posted in Hot Dogs | Leave a comment
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A corn dog is a hot dog sausage coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter and deep fried in oil, although some are baked. Almost all

Corn Dog on a stick

corn dogs are served on wooden sticks, though some early versions had no stick.

There is some debate as to the exact origins of the corn dog; they appeared in some ways in the US by the 1920s, and were popularized nationally in the 1940s. A US patent filed in 1927, granted in 1929, for a Combined Dipping, Cooking, and Article Holding Apparatus, describes corn dogs, among other fried food impaled on a stick; it reads in part:
“I have discovered that articles of food such, for instance, as wieners, boiled ham, hard boiled eggs, cheese, sliced peaches, pineapples, bananas and like fruit, and cherries, dates, figs, strawberries, etc., when impaled on sticks and dipped in batter, which includes in its ingredients a self rising flour, and then deep fried in a vegetable oil at a temperature of about 390°F., the resultant food product on a stick for a handle is a clean, wholesome and tasty refreshment.”

In 300 Years of Kitchen Collectibles, author Linda Campbell Franklin states that a “Krusty Korn Dog baker” machine appeared in the 1929 Albert Pick-L. Barth wholesale catalog of hotel and restaurant supplies. The ‘korn dogs’ were baked in a corn batter and resembled ears of corn when cooked.

A number of current corn dog vendors lay claim that credit for the invention and/or popularization of the corn dog. Carl and Neil Fletcher lay such a claim, having introduced their “Corny Dogs” at the Texas State Fair sometime between 1938 and 1942. The Pronto Pup vendors at the Minnesota State Fair claim to have invented the corn dog in 1941. Cozy Dog Drive-in, in Springfield, Illinois, claims to have been the first to serve corn dogs on sticks, on June 16, 1946. Also in 1946, Dave Barham opened the first location of Hot Dog on a Stick at Muscle Beach, Santa Monica, California.

Corn dogs are often served as street food or as fast food. Some vendors or restaurateurs dip and fry their dogs just before serving. Corn

Corn dog (cross section)

dogs can also be found at almost any supermarket in North America as frozen food that can be heated and served. Some corn dog purveyors sell these premade frozen corn dogs which have been thawed and then fried again or browned in an oven. Premade frozen corn dogs can also be microwaved, but the cornbread coating will lack texture.[8][9] Corn dogs may be eaten plain or with a variety of condiments, such as ketchup, mustard, relish and mayonnaise.

Both vegetarian corn dogs and corn dog nuggets are made as meatless alternatives by many of the same companies that produce veggie dogs.
A breakfast version of the corn dog consists of a breakfast sausage deep-fried in a pancake batter.
In Argentina they are called panchukers and are sold mostly around train stations, and are more popular in the inner country cities. They are often consumed on the street, and may contain cheese. They are served with a number of sauces.
In Australia, a hot dog sausage on a stick, deep fried in batter, is known as a Dagwood Dog, Pluto Pup or Dippy Dog, depending on region.[citation needed] Variants exist that use wheat-based or corn-based batters.[10] These are not to be confused with the British and Australian battered sav, a saveloy deep fried in a wheat flour based batter, as used for fish and chips, which generally does not contain cornmeal.[11] In New Zealand and South Korea, a similar battered sausage on a stick is called a “hot dog”, whereas a “frankfurter” sausage in a long bun is referred to as an “American hot dog”.
In Japan, something like a corn dog can be found at many supermarkets and convenience stores as “American Dogs” for their American origin. These American Dogs, however use a wheat-flour based batter with no cornmeal at all.
In Canada, corn dogs may be referred to as “pogo sticks”, or “pogos”, after a popular brand name.
Another version comes with either melted cheese between the hot dog and the breading or the hot dog is replaced with a cheese-filled hot dog.
Yet another version is the “cornbrat” (or “corn brat”), which is a corn dog made with bratwurst instead of a wiener or hot dog.
Hot dogs can also so be covered in a potato and egg coating; fried and served on a stick like a corn dog. In effect, the cornbread component is replaced with a latke.
Small corn dogs, known as “corn puppies,” “mini corn dogs,” or “corn dog nuggets,” are a variation served in some restaurants, generally on the children’s menu or at fast food establishments. A serving includes multiple pieces, usually 10. In contrast to their larger counterparts, corn puppies are normally served stickless as finger food.

National Corndog Day is a celebration of the corn dog, tater tots, and American beer that occurs on the first Saturday of March of every year.

Fried Shrimp w/ Mac & Cheese

March 14, 2012 at 5:26 PM | Posted in Food, seafood, shrimp | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Deep Fried Shrimp w/ Mac & Cheese

Broke out the ole Fry Daddy to fry my Shrimp with! haven’t used it in years and with a little cleaning it’s as good as new. I used Large White Shrimp and I rolled them in Hooter’s Wing Breading. I fried them in extra Virgin Olive Oil for 5 minutes and then laid them on a paper towel lined plate to drain the excess Oil off. Served with a side of Kroger Brand Medium Wing Sauce for dipping. Shrimp came out delicious! Next time though I’ll use a bigger Shrimp if I deep fry them. The smaller ones got done real quick.

For a side I had Chef Boyardee Mac & Cheese. First time I tried the Boyardee Brand of Mac & Cheese and it was quite good. It comes in a microwavable can and has 2 servings in it. For dessert later a Smart One Fudge Brownie Chocolate Sundae.

National dish of the Week – Philippines

August 12, 2011 at 12:41 PM | Posted in baking, Food | 1 Comment
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Philippine cuisine consists of the foods, preparation methods and eating customs found in the Philippines. The style of cooking and the foods associated with it have evolved over several centuries from its Austronesian origins to a mixed cuisine with many Hispanic, Chinese, American, and other Asian influences adapted to indigenous ingredients and the local palate.

Dishes range from the very simple, like a meal of fried salted fish and rice, to the elaborate paellas and cocidos created for fiestas. Popular dishes include lechón (whole roasted pig), longganisa (Philippine sausage), tapa (cured beef), torta (omelette), adobo (chicken and/or pork braised in garlic, vinegar, oil and soy sauce, or cooked until dry), kaldereta (meat in tomato sauce stew), mechado (larded beef in soy and tomato sauce), puchero (beef in bananas and tomato sauce), afritada (chicken and/or pork simmered in a tomato sauce with vegetables), kare-kare (oxtail and vegetables cooked in peanut sauce), crispy pata (deep-fried pig’s leg), hamonado (pork sweetened in pineapple sauce), sinigang (meat or seafood in sour broth), pancit (noodles), and lumpia (fresh or fried spring rolls).

Austronesians during the pre-Hispanic era in the Philippines prepared food by boiling, steaming, or roasting. This ranged from the

Filipino cuisine

usual livestock such as kalabaw (water buffaloes), baka (cows), manok (chickens) and baboy (pigs) to various kinds of fish and seafood. In a few places, the broad range of their diet extended to monitor lizards, snakes and locusts. Filipinos have been cultivating rice since 3200 BC when Austronesian ancestors from the southern China Yunnan Plateau and Taiwan settled in what is now the Philippines. They brought with them rice cultivation and a lot of other various traditions that are used in forms today.

Trade with Hokkien China in the Philippines prospered prior the arrival of the European nations, going back as early as the Song dynasty (960–1279 BC) with porcelain, ceramics, and silk being traded for spices and trapang in Luzon. This early cultural contact with China introduced a number of staple foods into Philippine cuisine, most notably toyo (soy sauce),  and patis (fish sauce), as well as the method of stir frying and making savory soup bases. Many of these food items and dishes retained their original Hokkien names, such as pancit, and lumpia. The Chinese food introduced during this period were foods of the workers and traders, which be became a staple of the noodle shops (panciterias), and can be seen in dishes like arroz caldo (congee), morisqueta tostada (an obsolete term for sinangag or fried rice), chopsuey.

Spanish settlers brought with them produce from the Americas like chili peppers, tomatoes, corn, potatoes, and the method of sautéing with garlic and onions. Although chili peppers are nowhere as widely used in Filipino cooking compared to much of Southeast Asia, chili leaves are frequently used as a cooking green, again distinct from the cooking of neighbors. Spanish (and Mexican) dishes were eventually incorporated into Philippine cuisine with the more complex dishes usually being prepared for special occasions. Some dishes such as arroz a la valenciana remain largely the same in the Philippine context. Some have been adapted or have come to take on a slightly or significantly different meaning. Arroz a la cubana served in the Philippines usually includes ground beef picadillo. Philippine longganisa despite its name is more akin to chorizo than Spanish longaniza. Morcon is likely to refer to a beef roulade dish not the bulbous specialty Spanish sausage.

Today, Philippine cuisine continues to evolve as new techniques, styles of cooking, and ingredients find their way into the country. Traditional dishes both simple and elaborate, indigenous and foreign-influenced, are seen as are more current popular international viands and fast food fare.

Filipino cuisine is distinguished by its bold combination of sweet (tamis), sour (asim), and salty (alat) flavors. While other Asian cuisines may be known for a more subtle delivery and presentation, Filipino cuisine is often delivered all at once in a single presentation.

As with most Asian countries, the staple food in the Philippines is rice. It is most often steamed and served during meals. Leftover rice is often fried with garlic to make sinangag, which is usually served at breakfast together with a fried egg and cured meat or sausages. Rice is often enjoyed with the sauce or broth from the main dishes. In some regions, rice is mixed with salt, condensed milk, cocoa, or coffee. Rice flour is used in making sweets, cakes and other pastries. While rice is the main staple food, bread is also a common staple.

A variety of fruits and vegetables are often used in cooking. Bananas (the saba variety in particular), Calamondin (kalamansi), guava (bayabas), mangoes, papaya, and pineapples lend a distinctly tropical flair in many dishes, but mainstay green leafy vegetables like water spinach (kangkong), Chinese cabbage (petsay), Napa cabbage (petsay wombok), cabbage (repolyo) and other vegetables like eggplants (talong) and yard-long beans (sitaw) are just as commonly used. Coconuts are ubiquitous. Coconut meat is often used in desserts, coconut milk (kakang gata) in sauces, and coconut oil for frying. Abundant harvests of root crops like potatoes, carrots, taro (gabi), cassava (kamoteng kahoy), purple yam (ube), and sweet potato (kamote) make them readily available. The combination of tomatoes (kamatis), garlic (bawang), and onions (sibuyas) is found in many dishes.

Meat staples include chicken, pork, beef, and fish. Seafood is popular as a result of the bodies of water surrounding the archipelago. Popular catches include tilapia, catfish (hito), milkfish (bangus), grouper (lapu-lapu), shrimp (hipon), prawns (sugpo), mackerel (galunggong, hasa-hasa), swordfish, oysters (talaba), mussels (tahong), clams (halaan and tulya), large and small crabs (alimango and alimasag respectively), game fish, sablefish, tuna, cod, blue marlin, and squid/cuttlefish (both called pusit). Also popular are seaweeds, abalone, and eel.

The most common way of having fish is to have it salted, pan-fried or deep-fried, and then eaten as a simple meal with rice and vegetables. It may also be cooked in a sour broth of tomatoes or tamarind as in pangat, prepared with vegetables and a souring agent to make sinigang, simmered in vinegar and peppers to make paksiw, or roasted over hot charcoal or wood (inihaw). Other preparations include escabeche (sweet and sour) or relleno (deboned and stuffed). Fish can be preserved by being smoked (tinapa) or sun-dried (tuyo or daing).

Food is often served with various dipping sauces. Fried food is often dipped in vinegar, soy sauce, juice squeezed from kalamansi (Philippine lime, calamondin, or calamansi), or a combination of two or all. Patis (fish sauce) may be mixed with kalamansi as dipping sauce for most seafood. Fish sauce, fish paste (bagoong), shrimp paste (bagoong alamang) and crushed ginger root (luya) are condiments that are often added to dishes during the cooking process or when served.

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