Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes

October 8, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes with recipes including Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya, Slow-Cooker Jambalaya, and Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Also don’t forget to subscribe to the EatingWell Magazine, packed full of delicious and healthy recipes in every issue! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
Find healthy, delicious Cajun and Creole recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Catfish and Sausage Jambalaya
This catfish and sausage jambalaya recipe is one you might find in a neighborhood eatery in Creole country. Turkey sausage links have fewer calories and less fat than traditional pork sausage, but still deliver amazing taste to this dish……………….

Slow-Cooker Jambalaya
This hearty jambalaya is bursting with chicken, smoked turkey sausage, and shrimp. It takes just 25 minutes to prep in the morning and then your slow cooker will work its magic and deliver a tasty meal at the end of the day…………………

Chicken and Shrimp Jambalaya
The slow cooker makes easy work of this healthy jambalaya featuring brown rice and plenty of veggies. If you don’t want to make your own seasoning, just skip Step 1 and use 1½ teaspoons purchased salt-free Cajun seasoning in Step 2……………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Cajun and Creole Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19698/cuisines-regions/usa/cajun-creole/

One of America’s Favorites – Étouffée

September 16, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Crawfish étouffée, served at a restaurant in New Orleans

Étouffée or etouffee (French: [e.tu.fe], English: /ˌeɪtuːˈfeɪ/ AY-too-FAY) is a dish found in both Cajun and Creole cuisine typically served with shellfish over rice. The dish employs a technique known as smothering, a popular method of cooking in the Cajun areas of southwest Louisiana. Étouffée is most popular in New Orleans and in the Acadiana area of the southernmost half of Louisiana as well as the coastal counties of Mississippi, Alabama, northern Florida, and eastern Texas.

In French, the word “étouffée” (borrowed into English as “stuffed” or “stifled”) literally means “smothered” or “suffocated”, from the verb “étouffer”.

Étouffée is a dish of seafood or chicken simmered in a sauce made from a light or blond roux.

It is most commonly made with shellfish, such as crab or shrimp. The most popular version of the dish is made with crayfish (or “crawfish”).

Étouffée is typically served over rice.

Another version of crawfish étouffée

Depending on who is making it and where it is being made it is flavored with either Creole or Cajun seasonings. Although Creole and Cajun cuisines are distinct, there are many similarities. In the case of the Creole version of crawfish étouffée, it is made with a blonde or brown roux and sometimes tomatoes are added. A blond roux is one that is cooked, stirring constantly, for approximately 5 minutes to remove the “raw” flavor of the flour and to add a slightly “nutty” flavor, while a brown roux is cooked longer (30 to 35 minutes) in order to deepen the color and flavor.

Around the 1950s, crawfish étouffée was introduced to restaurant goers in Breaux Bridge, Louisiana; however, the dish may have been invented as early as the late 1920s, according to some sources. Originally, crawfish étouffée was a popular dish amongst Cajuns in the bayous and backwaters of Louisiana. Around 1983, a waiter at the popular Bourbon Street restaurant Galatoire’s brought the dish to his boss to try. At the time, most New Orleans restaurants served French Creole cuisine, but this Cajun dish was a hit.

Some of my favorite Sides and Seasonings -Zatarain’s!

May 29, 2017 at 12:35 PM | Posted in Zatarain's | Leave a comment
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Below is just a sample of the delicious recipes you can find at the Zatarain’s website (https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains). Check it out today!

 

 

BANANAS FOSTER RICE PUDDING
Turn ordinary rice pudding into a classic New Orleans favorite dessert, Bananas Foster Rice Pudding. Mix 1 package of Zatarain’s Rice Pudding, milk, butter, brown sugar, heavy cream and, of course, 2 ripe bananas…….

 

Dirty Rice Burritos
Craving a Mexican dish? Try this dirty rice, egg and chorizo burrito recipe for any time of day – breakfast, lunch or dinner. Just open a box of Zatarain’s Dirty Rice Mix, and add sausage and eggs, and whisk in Zatarain’s Creole Seasoning for added New Orleans flavor………

 

Creole Chicken and Vegetable Soup
Need an easy veggie soup recipe? Add the bold flavor of Zatarain’s® Yellow Rice and Creole Seasoning into the pot and use any fresh or frozen vegetables you have on hand to prepare this quick and easy soup……..

 

Find these incredible recipes and more all at the Zatrain’s website.
https://www.mccormick.com/zatarains

MARDI GRAS AT THE MARKET -Findlay Market Cincinnati, Ohio

February 24, 2017 at 9:23 AM | Posted in Food | Leave a comment
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Mardi Gras at the Market is back, y’all! Mark your calendars for Sunday, February 26, 2017 from 11a-4p, and enjoy live music, Hurricane cocktails, local craft beers, food with a Cajun flair and merchant specials all day. Read on for the delectable details…

 

AVAILABLE ALL DAY:mardis-market

Mardi Gras-themed food from Smiley’s Bayou Catering & Schell’s Sweet & Savory Sensations
Hurricane Cocktails from LL Spirits
Local Craft Beer from Rhinegeist & Christian Moerlein
Merchant Specials (details below)
Live music from Lagniappe, J Dorsey Band and The Cincy Brass Jazz Quartet
Mardi Gras Beads (while supplies last)
WHEN: 26 February, 2017 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM

 

Findlay Market 1801 Race St. Cincinnati, Ohio
http://www.findlaymarket.org/events/mardis-gras

One of America’s Favorites – Gumbo

February 6, 2017 at 6:17 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A bowl of shrimp, chicken and bacon gumbo, served over rice

A bowl of shrimp, chicken and bacon gumbo, served over rice

Gumbo is a stew that originated in southern Louisiana during the 18th century. It consists primarily of a strongly-flavored stock, meat or shellfish, a thickener, and what Louisianians call the “Holy Trinity” of vegetables, namely celery, bell peppers, and onions. Gumbo is often categorized by the type of thickener used, the vegetable okra, the Choctaw spice filé powder (dried and ground sassafras leaves), or roux, the French base made of flour and fat. The dish likely derived its name from either a word from a Bantu language for okra (ki ngombo) or the Choctaw word for filé (kombo).

Several different varieties exist. Creole gumbo generally contains shellfish, tomatoes, and a dark roux, file, or both. Cajun gumbo is generally based on a dark roux and is made with shellfish or fowl. Sausage or ham is often added to gumbos of either variety. After the base is prepared, vegetables are cooked down, and then meat is added. The dish simmers for a minimum of three hours, with shellfish and some spices added near the end. If desired, filé powder is added after the pot is removed from heat. Gumbo is traditionally served over rice. A third, lesser-known variety, the meatless gumbo z’herbes, is essentially a gumbo of slow-cooked greens sometimes thickened with roux, with rice served on the side.

The dish combines ingredients and culinary practices of several cultures, including French, Spanish, German, West African, and Choctaw. Gumbo may have been based on traditional West African or native dishes, or may be a derivation of the French dish bouillabaisse. It was first described in 1802, and was listed in various cookbooks in the latter half of the 19th century. The dish gained more widespread popularity in the 1970s, after the United States Senate cafeteria added it to the menu in honor of Louisiana Senator Allen Ellender. The popularity of chef Paul Prudhomme in the 1980s spurred further interest in gumbo. The dish is the official cuisine of the state of Louisiana.
Gumbo is a heavily seasoned soup or stew that combines several varieties of meat or seafood with a sauce or gravy. Any combination of meat or seafood can be used. Meat-based gumbo may consist of chicken, duck, squirrel, or rabbit, with oysters occasionally added. Seafood-based gumbo generally has shrimp, crabmeat, and sometimes oysters. Andouille sausage is often added to both meat and seafood gumbos to provide “piquancy, substance, and an additional layer of flavor” to the dish. With the exception of sausage and ham, beef and pork are almost never used. Most varieties of gumbo are seasoned with onions, parsley, bell pepper, and celery. Tomatoes are sometimes used in seafood gumbo, but traditionally few other vegetables are included.

 

Thickeners
Gumbo broth or gravy derives from three primary thickeners: okra, filé powder, and roux. Traditionally, okra and filé powder are not used in the same dish, although this rule is sometimes broken. Roux can be used alone or in conjunction with either of the other thickeners.

Okra is more often used as a thickener in seafood gumbos than those with meat. This mucilaginous vegetable is

Okra pods

Okra pods

usually cooked first, and other ingredients added once the desired consistency is reached. According to The Oxford Companion to Food, okra-based gumbos are becoming less popular, as changing tastes have made the okra texture less palatable.

Ground sassafras leaf, known as filé, is generally not added to the gravy until after the vegetables and meats or seafood have finished cooking and have been removed from the heat source. If added during the boiling process, filé makes the gumbo too ropey; when added at the end, the gumbo gains a slightly stringy texture.

Roux has become the most popular thickener, made from cooking together a roughly equal proportion of flour and fat (traditionally hog lard, although increasingly made with butter since the mid-20th century. The length of cooking time determines the final flavor and texture, since the longer the roux is cooked before being added to the gumbo, the darker it becomes and the less thickening power it retains. A very dark roux provides a much thinner sauce with a more intense flavor than a light roux.
Cajun vs. Creole gumbo

Creole seafood gumbo

Creole seafood gumbo

Gumbo is typically divided into two varieties. Combinations traditionally common in New Orleans and southeastern Louisiana are known as “Creole” after the Louisiana Creole people, descendants of French and Spanish settlers, who lived in those areas. “Cajun” combinations were common in southwestern Louisiana, which was populated primarily by Cajuns, descendants of the French-speaking settlers expelled from Acadia (located within the modern-day Canadian provinces of Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island) in the mid-18th century.

Gumbo is usually identified by its dark roux, cooked until it is a color “a few shades from burning”. The roux is used with okra or filé powder. Seafood is popular in gumbo the closer to the water the people are, but the southwestern areas of Louisiana often use fowl, such as chicken or duck, and sausage.[8][9] The fowl is generally not deboned, and onions, celery, and bell pepper are not strained out of the dish. Cajun gumbo is usually topped with parsley and green onions.

Creole gumbo most often consists of seafood, tomatoes, and a thickener. Before the latter half of the 20th century, celery was rarely used in Creole gumbo.
Gumbo is cooked for a minimum of three hours, and often simmers all day. Meat (but not seafood) is often browned beforehand and removed from the heat. Okra and roux are cooked before other vegetables and seafood. Okra is removed from heat when it reaches the desired consistency, while roux remains in the pot. Seasoning vegetables are then added to the sauce. When these have turned to mush (more commonly called cooked down), the meat and okra are added to the pot along with water and/or stock, then boiled uncovered until the desired tenderness of the meat is reached. Seasonings, including red, black, and white pepper, bay leaves, thyme, hot sauce, and salt, are added to taste. According to Nobles, “proper seasoning of gumbo is essential, and in Louisiana adding just the right zing is considered an art”. Because seafood cooks fairly quickly, it is not added to the pot until the end of the process. As the gumbo finishes cooking, green onions and parsley are sometimes sprinkled on it. When desired, filé powder is added last.

Creole and Cajun gumbos are served over hot rice, which helps the dish to feed a larger number of people. Gumbo

Cajun seafood gumbo

Cajun seafood gumbo

z’herbes is served with rice on the side. Gumbo is almost always served directly from the pot on the stove, although in wealthier or fancier homes the dish might be transferred to a tureen on the table. Often, gumbo and bread are the sole courses in a meal, although many Cajun families provide a side dish of potato salad. Occasionally, gumbo is served as part of a larger menu.

Soniat gives examples of the main types of creole gumbos, along with descriptions of family traditions about them.

 

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