Diabetic Dessert of the Week – ALMOND CHEESECAKE BARS

May 9, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dessert of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dessert of the Week is – ALMOND CHEESECAKE BARS. Graham Crackers, Almonds, Reduced Fat Cream Cheese, Eggs, Reduced Fat Sour Cream are just some of the ingredients that make up this week’s recipe. Splenda No Calorie Sweetener replaces the Sugar in the recipe. The Dessert is 120 calories and 8 carbs per serving. The recipe is from the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes. Well Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

ALMOND CHEESECAKE BARS

Ingredients

Crust:

1/4 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
1 1/4 cups graham cracker or vanilla wafer crumbs
1/3 cup light butter, melted
1/4 cup toasted sliced almonds, finely ground
Filling:

12 ounces reduced fat cream cheese
1/2 cup Splenda No Calorie Sweetener, Granulated
2 large eggs
1/4 cup reduced fat sour cream
2-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract
1/4 cup toasted, sliced almonds

Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
2 – Spray an 8×8 pan with non-stick cooking spray.
3 – Mix crust ingredients together in a mixing bowl. Mix well. Press into prepared pan. Bake 10-12 minutes or until firm.
4 – Mix cream cheese and Splenda Granulated Sweetener together until smooth. Add eggs, one at a time, scraping the sides of the bowl, and mixing well after each addition. Add sour cream and extracts; mix well. Pour over prepared crust.
5 – Bake in preheated oven for 40 to 47 minutes, or until firm.
6 – Top with toasted almonds.

Recipe Yield: Serves: 20 Serving Size: 1 bar

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 120
Fat: 8 grams
Saturated Fat: 3.5 grams
Sodium: 105 milligrams
Cholesterol: 35 milligrams
Protein: 4 grams
Carbohydrates: 8 grams
Sugars: 4 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipes/almond-cheesecake-bars

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Diabetic Dish of the Week – Roasted Eggplant Rolls

February 26, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – Roasted Eggplant Rolls. The perfect Appetizer, it’s only 77 calories and 12 carbs per serving (2 rolls with 2 tablespoons pasta sauce) Along with 2 Egg Plants you’ll need Cream Cheese, Sour Cream, Green Onion, Dried Tomatoes, Spinach Leaves, Herbs, and Pasta Sauce. The recipe is from one of my favorite sites, the Diabetes Self Management website. At the Diabetes site you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes Management Tips, Diabetes News, and much more so check it out today! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Roasted Eggplant Rolls
These eggplant rolls are pretty on a serving platter, full of herbs to make it the perfect Italian dish, and pair excellently with warmed pasta sauce.

Ingredients
2 medium eggplants (3/4 pound each)
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon olive oil
4 tablespoons (2 oz) fat-free cream cheese
2 tablespoons fat-free sour cream
1 green onion, minced
4 sun-dried tomatoes (packed in oil), rinsed, drained and minced
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
16 fresh stemmed spinach leaves
1 cup meatless pasta sauce

Directions
1. Preheat oven to 450 F. Spray 2 nonstick baking sheets with non-stick cooking spray; set aside. Trim ends from eggplants. Cut eggplants lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Discard outside slices that are mostly skin (You will have about 16 slices total). Arrange slices in single layer on prepared baking sheets.

2. Combine lemon juice and olive oil in small bowl; brush lightly over both sides of eggplant slices. Bake 22 to 24 minutes or until slightly golden brown, turning once. Transfer eggplant slices to plate; cool.

3. Meanwhile, stir together cream cheese, sour cream, green onion, sun-dried tomatoes, garlic, oregano, and pepper in small bowl until blended.

4. Spread about 1 teaspoon cream cheese mixture evenly over each eggplant slice. Arrange spinach leaf on top, leaving 1/2-inch border. Roll up, beginning at small end. Lay rolls, seam side down, on serving platter. If making ahead, cover and refrigerate up to 2 days. Bring to room temperature before serving. Serve with warmed pasta sauce.

Yield: 8 servings (16 rolls).

Serving size: 2 rolls with 2 tablespoons pasta sauce.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 77 calories, Carbohydrates: 12 g, Protein: 3 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 0 mg, Sodium: 213 mg, Fiber: 1 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/snacks-appetizers/roasted-eggplant-rolls/

One of America’s Favorites – Bagel and Cream Cheese

February 25, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A bagel with cream cheese

A bagel and cream cheese (also known as bagel with cream cheese) is a common food pairing in American cuisine, the cuisine of New York City, and American Jewish cuisine, consisting in its basic form of an open-faced sandwich made of a bagel spread with cream cheese. The bagel is typically sliced into two pieces, and can be served as-is or toasted. The basic bagel with cream cheese serves as the base for other sandwiches such as the “lox and schmear”, a staple of delicatessens in the New York area, and across the U.S.

A bagel with cream cheese is common in American cuisine and the cuisine of New York City. In the United States, the bagel and cream cheese is often eaten for breakfast, and with smoked salmon is sometimes served for brunch. In New York City circa 1900, a popular combination consisted of a bagel topped with lox, cream cheese, capers, tomato, and red onion.

The combination of a bagel with cream cheese has been promoted to American consumers in the past by American food manufacturers and publishers. In the early 1950s, Kraft Foods launched an “aggressive advertising campaign” that depicted Philadelphia-brand cream cheese with bagels. In 1977, Better Homes and Family Circle magazines published a bagel and cream cheese recipe booklet that was distributed in the magazines and also placed in supermarket dairy cases.

In American Jewish cuisine, a bagel and cream cheese is sometimes called a “whole schmear” or “whole schmeer”, indicating a bagel with cream cheese. A “slab” is a bagel served with a slab of

A “lox and a schmear” refers to a sliced bagel with cream cheese and lox, a part of American Jewish cuisine.

cream cheese atop it. A “lox and a schmear” refers to a bagel with cream cheese and lox or smoked salmon. Tomato, red onion, capers and chopped hard-boiled egg are additional ingredients that are sometimes used on the lox and schmear. All of these terms are used at some delicatessens in New York City, particularly at Jewish delicatessens and older, more traditional delicatessens.

The lox and schmear likely originated in New York City around the time of the turn of the 20th century, when street vendors in the city sold salt-cured belly lox from pushcarts. A high amount of

salt in the fish necessitated the addition of bread and cheese to reduce the lox’s saltiness. It was reported by U.S. newspapers in the early 1940s that bagels and lox were sold by delicatessens in New York City as a “Sunday morning treat”, and in the early 1950s, bagels and cream cheese combination were very popular in the United States, having permeated American culture.

Both bagels and cream cheese are mass-produced foods in the United States. Additionally, in January 2003, Kraft Foods began purveying a mass-produced convenience food product named Philadelphia To Go Bagel & Cream Cheese, which consisted of a combined package of two bagels and cream cheese.

 

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Cucumber and Turkey Ham on Rye

December 28, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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I have a couple of Appetizer recipes that are perfect for your New Year Eve’s Party. The first one is this week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Cucumber and Turkey Ham on Rye. Easy made and only 90 calories and 7 net carbs per serving! It’s made using JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Turkey Ham (25% water added) along with; small slices of Rye Bread, Cream Cheese, Cucumber, fresh Dill (OPTIONAL). Easy to make and just the perfect size Appetizer. Its from the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH for 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Cucumber and Turkey Ham on Rye
Mini sandwiches win over any party. Ready in just under 15 minutes, you’ll want to keep this turkey appetizer recipe handy for your next gathering.

INGREDIENTS
8 ounces sliced JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Turkey Ham, 25% water added, from the service deli
32 small slices rye bread
6 ounces cream cheese, softened
1 small cucumber, peeled and sliced
fresh dill, if desired

DIRECTIONS
1) Cut each slice of turkey ham into quarters; set aside. Spread bread pieces with cream cheese. Fold turkey quarters in half. Place turkey on cream cheese.
2) Top each piece with cucumber slice and garnish with fresh dill, if desired

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS
FULLY COOKED – READY TO EAT:
This product is fully cooked and is “Ready To Eat”.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 90
Protein 4g
Carbohydrates 8g
Fiber 1g
Sugars 1g
Fat 5g
Cholesterol 20mg
Sodium 260mg
Saturated Fat 2.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/29-cucumber-and-turkey-ham-on-rye

 

Jennie – O Extra Lean Turkey Ham, 25% water added
It’s ham — turkey style! JENNIE-O® Extra Lean Turkey Ham makes a tasty and nutritious addition to any sandwich or soup. It comes fully cooked and ready to use. Turkey Ham also has 2% or less salt and is gluten free! Find it in the deli section of the grocery store.

* GLUTEN FREE
* CONTAINS 2% OR LESS SALT
* FULLY COOKED
Ask for this product in the deli section of your grocery store.

NUTRITION INFORMATION
Serving Size 56 g
Calories 60
Calories From Fat 30
Total Fat 3.0 g
Saturated Fat 1.0 g
Trans Fat .0 g
Cholesterol 30 mg
Sodium 510 mg
Total Carbohydrates 2 g
Dietary Fiber 0 g
Sugars 1 g
Protein 8 g
Vitamin A 0%
Vitamin C 0%
Iron 2%
Calcium 0%
https://www.jennieo.com/products/56-extra-lean-turkey-ham-25prc-water-added

“Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week – Black Bean Burritos

December 3, 2018 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Meatless Monday | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipe of the Week is – Black Bean Burritos. Anything using Black Beans has to be good! Thank you to Trina for passing this recipe along to me. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018!

 

Black Bean Burritos

Ingredients
2 (10 inch) flour tortillas
2 tablespoons extra light olive oil
1 small red onion, chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, chopped
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 (15 ounce) can low-sodium black beans, rinsed and drained
1 teaspoon minced jalapeno peppers
3 ounces reduced-fat cream cheese
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
* Your favorite salsa or taco sauce (Optional)

Directions
1 – Wrap tortillas in foil and place in oven heated to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Bake for 15 minutes or until heated through.
2 – Heat oil in a 10-inch skillet over medium heat. Place onion, bell pepper, garlic and jalapenos in skillet, cook for 2 minutes stirring occasionally. Pour beans into skillet, cook 3 minutes stirring.
3 – Cut cream cheese into cubes and add to skillet with salt. Cook for 2 minutes stirring occasionally. Stir cilantro into mixture.
4 – Spoon mixture evenly down center of warmed tortilla and roll tortillas up. Serve immediately. Top with salsa or taco sauce.

Classic Skyline Chili Dip – Party Size

September 26, 2018 at 11:05 AM | Posted in Skyline Chili | 7 Comments
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With Football and the Fall weather here it’s time for some Classic Skyline Chili Dip – Party Size. Serve it with your favorite Chips or Crackers. Enjoy!

Classic Skyline Chili Dip – Party Size

What you need:

Classic Skyline Chili Dip – Party Size

9 x 13 Oven/Microwave Safe Pan

12 ounces of cream cheese softened to room temp
13 to 15 ounces of Skyline Chili
1 quart microwave safe bowl
12 ounces of Skyline Shredded Cheddar Cheese
Your favorite tortilla or corn chips

How to prepare:
1 – Preheat oven to 375 degrees
2 – Spread 12 ounces of cream cheese in an even layer into your pan
3 – Heat 13 to 15 ounces of Skyline Chili in covered 1 quart microwave safe bowl on high for 2 minutes
4 – Pour heated chili evenly over the cream cheese layer
5 – Place pan in preheated (375 degrees) oven for 10 minutes
6 – Remove from oven and top evenly with 12 ounces of Skyline Shredded Cheddar Cheese
7 – Let stand for 5 minutes
8 – Dig in! Scoop the Skyline Dip with your favorite tortilla or corn chip

http://www.skylinechili.com/index.php

http://www.skylinechili.com/promotions.php

One of America’s Favorites – Cheese and Crackers

September 24, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cheese and crackers

Cheese and crackers is a common dish consisting of crackers paired with various or multiple cheeses. It is also known as cheese and biscuits outside the United Kingdom, United States and Canada. Historically the fare of sailors, soldiers, and pioneers, it became popular in American restaurants and taverns around the 1850s. It is prepared using various types of cheeses, and is often paired with wine. Mass-produced cheese and crackers brands include Handi-Snacks, Ritz, Jatz and Lunchables.

 

 

Cheese and crackers with red wine and other foods

Cheese and crackers is a common snack food or hors d’oeuvre consisting of crackers paired with various cheeses. In the United States it has also been served as a dessert, with the addition of ingredients such as jam, jelly, marmalade or preserves. It is also commonly served at parties in the U.S., and in the Southern United States, it is relatively common for hot chili pepper jelly to be served atop cream cheese and crackers at cocktail parties. Cheese and crackers has a relatively high amount of protein, per the cheese as an ingredient.

Cheese and crackers is a common food-pairing that can serve to complement various cheeses, and the dish can be paired with wines. The cheese can be sliced or cubed, and served separately with crackers or pre-placed atop the crackers.

Cheese and crackers has been consumed by various sailors such as immigrants, whalers and explorers before refrigeration existed, using hardtack crackers and cheese. It has also been consumed by various land explorers.

Cheese and crackers with cubed cheddar cheese

Cheese and crackers increased in popularity circa the 1850s, when bakers began producing thinner crackers with a lighter texture compared to hard tack. During this time period, the combination was placed on restaurant menus as an after-dessert course and was also served in saloons. Cheese and crackers was a food ration used by soldiers during the American Civil War (1861–1865). Some soldiers at the time referred to cheese and crackers as a “square meal”. Cheese and hardtack was consumed along with dried venison meat by Ezra Meeker during his time on the Oregon Trail in 1852. In 1915, mountaineer Philip Rogers consumed cheese and hardtack along with raisins and nuts during his expedition around Mount Rainier in Washington state.

Circa the beginning of the 20th century, cheese and crackers was being prepared in homes and cooked by baking it and adding additional ingredients after cooking, such as paprika and mustard. At this time, the combination was sometimes served with soups and salads, and was used on salads for decades thereafter. It was also commonly served at parties beginning around this time. It was consumed as a dessert, rather than after-dessert by some during the Great Depression in the United States, and was sometimes consumed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Eleanor Roosevelt in the White House for dessert, along with other foods.

Starting in the 1950s, cheese and crackers was recommended as a snack for children by parenting experts, home economists and authors of cookbooks. The snack increased in popularity during the mid-1980s when Oscar Mayer introduced its Lunchables product, which included cheese, crackers and lunch meat, and occurred in part to boost the company’s lunch meat sales.

A Handi-Snack

Handi-Snacks is a mass-produced cheese and crackers snack food that is prepared using processed cheese. Lunchables is another commercial product that includes cheese and crackers as ingredients. Fancy cheese and crackers was a cheese and crackers lunch product purveyed by Oscar Mayer in the mid-1980s that included additional foods such as lunch meat and a dessert.

 

Meanwhile back at the SayersBrook Bison Ranch….Dieter’s Delight Bison Pastrami Casserole

June 30, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in SayersBrook Ranch | Leave a comment
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This week from the SayersBrook Bison Ranch website (http://www.sayersbrook.com/) I’m passing along a recipe, Dieter’s Delight Bison Pastrami Casserole. You’ll be using the SayersBrook Bison Pastrami to make the dish. You can find this recipe and purchase the Bison Pastrami all at the SayersBrook site. You’ll also be able to purchase cuts of Bison, Elk, Wild Boar, Rabbit, Ostrich, and more! So check the site out today and fire that grill up! Now on to the recipe for Dieter’s Delight Bison Pastrami Casserole. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.sayersbrook.com/

 

Dieter’s Delight Bison Pastrami Casserole

Bison Pastrami: It’s lean; it’s tender; it’s delicious. The healthy alternative to beef. When you purchase our ready made pastrami your order includes 2 (1 lb) packages of Sliced Corned Bison.

Dieter’s Delight Bison Pastrami Casserole
author connie sayers

yield 8 servings

Ingredients
Ingredients:

1 (8-oz.) low-fat cream cheese, softened
2 T. instant minced onion
1/2 c. pecans, chopped (optional)
2 T. fresh green pepper, chopped
1/2 c. low-fat sour cream
2 T. skim milk
3 oz. Bison pastrami, finely chopped
1/2 tsp. white pepper

Instructions
1 – Combine all ingredients and put into 1 quart casserole dish.
2 – Bake in preheated 350° oven for 20 minutes, or until edges are bubbly.
3 – Serve with crackers or Melba toast.
Notes
Leftovers may be served cold.
http://cooking-buffalo.com/dieters-delight-bison-pastrami-casserole/

 

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1-888-854-4449 | or: 1-888-472-9377
Fax: 855-398-4409
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http://www.sayersbrook.com/

One of America’s Favorites – Cream Cheese

June 11, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Cream Cheese

Cream cheese is a soft, mild-tasting fresh cheese made from milk and cream. Stabilizers such as carob bean gum and carrageenan are typically added in industrial production.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration defines cream cheese as containing at least 33% milk fat with a moisture content of not more than 55%, and a pH range of 4.4 to 4.9. Similarly, under Canadian Food and Drug Regulations cream cheese must contain at least 30% milk fat and a maximum of 55% moisture. In other countries, it is defined differently and may need a considerably higher fat content.

Cream cheese is not naturally matured and is meant to be consumed fresh, so it differs from other soft cheeses such as Brie and Neufchâtel. It is more comparable in taste, texture, and production methods to Boursin and Mascarpone.

Recipes for cream cheese can be found in U.S. cookbooks and newspapers beginning in the mid-18th century. By the 1820s the dairy farms in and around Philadelphia and New York City had gained a reputation for producing the best examples of this cheese. Cream cheese was produced on family farms throughout the country, so quantities made and distributed were typically small.

A block of Philadelphia cream cheese

Around 1873 William A. Lawrence, a Chester, New York dairyman, was the first to mass-produce cream cheese. In 1872 he purchased a Neufchâtel factory and shortly thereafter, by adding cream to the process, was able to create a richer cheese that he called “cream cheese”. In 1877 he created the first brand of cream cheese: its logo was a silhouette of a cow followed by the words “Neufchatel & Cream Cheese”. In 1879, to create a larger factory, Lawrence entered into an arrangement with another Chester merchant, Samuel S. Durland. In 1880, Alvah Reynolds, a New York cheese distributor, began to sell the cheese of Lawrence & Durland and called it “Philadelphia Cream Cheese”. By the end of 1880, faced with increasing demand for his Philadelphia-brand cheese, Reynolds turned to Charles Green, a second Chester dairyman, who by 1880 had been manufacturing cream cheese as well. Some of Green’s cheese was now also sold under the Philadelphia label. In 1892 Reynolds bought the Empire Cheese Co. of South Edmeston, New York, to produce cheese under his “Philadelphia” label. When the Empire factory burned down in 1900 he asked the newly formed Phenix Cheese Company to create his cheese, instead. In 1903 Reynolds sold rights to the “Philadelphia” brand name to Phenix Cheese Company under the direction of Jason F. Whitney, Sr. (which merged with Kraft in 1928). By the early 1880s Star cream cheese had emerged as Lawrence & Durland’s brand and Green’s made World and Globe brands of the cheese. At the turn of the 20th century, New York dairymen were producing cream cheese under a number of other brands, as well: Triple Cream (C. Percival), Eagle (F.X. Baumert), Empire (Phenix Cheese Co.), Mohican (International Cheese Co.), Monroe Cheese Co. (Gross & Hoffman), and Nabob (F.H. Legget).

Popular in the Jewish cuisine of New York City, where it is commonly known as a “schmear”, it forms the basis of the bagel and cream cheese, a common open-faced sandwich which also often includes lox, capers, and other ingredients. The basic bagel and cream cheese has become a ubiquitous breakfast and brunch food throughout the U.S.

Cream cheese is easy to make at home, and many methods and recipes are used. Consistent, reliable, commercial manufacture is more difficult. Normally, protein molecules in milk have a negative surface charge, which keeps milk in a liquid state; the molecules act as surfactants, forming micelles around the particles of fat and keeping them in emulsion. Lactic acid bacteria are added to pasteurized and homogenized milk. During the fermentation around 22 °C (72 °F), the pH of the milk decreases (it becomes more acidic). Amino acids at the surface of the proteins begin losing charge and become neutral, turning the fat micelles from hydrophilic to hydrophobic state and causing the liquid to coagulate. If the bacteria are left in the milk too long, the pH lowers further, the micelles attain a positive charge, and the mixture returns to liquid form. The key, then, is to kill the bacteria by heating the mixture to 52–63 °C (126–145 °F) at the moment the cheese is at the isoelectric point, meaning the state at which half the ionizable surface amino acids of the proteins are positively charged and half are negative.

Inaccurate timing of the heating can produce inferior or unsalable cheese due to variations in flavor and texture. Cream cheese has a higher fat content than other cheeses, and fat repels water, which tends to separate from the cheese; this can be avoided in commercial production by adding stabilizers such as guar or carob gums to prolong its shelf life.

In Canada, the regulations for cream cheese stipulate that it is made by coagulating cream with the help of bacteria, forming a curd which is then formed into a mass after removing the whey. Some of its ingredients include cream (to adjust milk fat content), salt, nitrogen (to improve spreadability) and several gelling, thickening, stabilizing and emulsifying ingredients such as xanthan gum or gelatin, to a maximum of 0.5 percent. Regulations on preservatives used are that either sorbic acid, or propionic acid may be used independently or combined, but only to a maximum of 3,000 parts per million when used together. The only acceptable enzymes that can be used in manufacturing of cream cheese to be sold in Canada are chymosin A and B, pepsin and rennet.

In Spain and Mexico, cream cheese is sometimes called by the generic name queso filadelfia, following the marketing of Philadelphia branded cream cheese by Kraft Foods.

Cream cheese is often spread on bread, bagels, crackers, etc., and used as a dip for potato chips and similar snack items, and in salads. It can be mixed with other ingredients, such as yogurt or pepper jelly, to make spreads.

Cream cheese on a bagel

Cream cheese can be used for many purposes in sweet and savoury cookery, and is in the same family of ingredients as other milk products, such as cream, milk, butter, and yogurt. It can be used in cooking to make cheesecake and to thicken sauces and make them creamy. Cream cheese is sometimes used in place of or with butter (typically two parts cream cheese to one part butter) when making cakes or cookies, and cream cheese frosting. It is the main ingredient in the filling of crab rangoon, an appetizer commonly served at U.S. Chinese restaurants. It can also be used instead of or with butter or olive oil in mashed potatoes, and in some westernized sushi rolls. It can also be used for ants on a log.

American cream cheese tends to have lower fat content than elsewhere, but “Philadelphia” branded cheese is sometimes suggested as a substitute for petit suisse.

 

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Turkey Bacon Biscuits

April 20, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Turkey Bacon Biscuits. Breakfast or Brunch it makes no difference with these delicious and healthy Turkey Bacon Biscuits! Made using JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon along with Cream Cheese, Eggs, Swiss Cheese, Green Onions, and served on Flaky Biscuits. They’re only 200 calories and 15 carbs per serving! You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2018!  https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey Bacon Biscuits
Bake up these flakey biscuits topped with egg and cheese sandwiched between crisp turkey bacon. An easy breakfast or brunch recipe for your family that’s ready in just 30 minutes.

INGREDIENTS
½ (8-ounce) package cream cheese, softened
3 eggs
2 tablespoons milk
½ cup shredded Swiss cheese
2 tablespoons chopped green onion
1 (10-ounce) can refrigerated flaky biscuits
5 slices JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon, cooked and crumbled
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley leaves

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 350ºF. Grease 10 muffin cups.
2) In small bowl, beat cream cheese, eggs and milk on low speed until smooth. Stir in Swiss cheese and green onion.
3) Separate biscuit dough into 10 biscuits. Place 1 biscuit in each greased muffin cup; firmly press in bottom and up sides, forming a ¼ -inch rim. Place half of bacon in bottom of dough-lined muffin cups. Spoon cream cheese mixture over bacon. Top with remaining bacon and parsley. Bake 20 to 25 minutes or until filling is set and biscuits are golden brown. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 200
Protein 6g
Carbohydrates 15g
Fiber 0g
Sugars 2g
Fat 12g
Cholesterol 70mg
Sodium 430mg
Saturated Fat 4.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/25-turkey-bacon-biscuits

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