One of America’s Favorites – Reuben Sandwich

March 16, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Reuben from Katz’s Delicatessen

The Reuben sandwich is an American grilled sandwich composed of corned beef, Swiss cheese, sauerkraut, and Russian dressing, grilled between slices of rye bread. It is associated with kosher-style delicatessens, but it is not kosher, because it contains both meat and cheese.

Possible origins
Reuben Kulakofsky, Blackstone Hotel: Omaha, Nebraska
One origin story holds that Reuben Kulakofsky (his first name sometimes spelled Reubin; his last name sometimes shortened to Kay), a Jewish Lithuanian-born grocer residing in Omaha, Nebraska, was the inventor, perhaps as part of a group effort by members of Kulakofsky’s weekly poker game held in the Blackstone Hotel from around 1920 through 1935. The participants, who nicknamed themselves “the committee”, included the hotel’s owner, Charles Schimmel. The sandwich first gained local fame when Schimmel put it on the Blackstone’s lunch menu, and its fame spread when a former employee of the hotel won a national contest with the recipe. In Omaha, March 14 was proclaimed Reuben Sandwich Day. Mention is made of this sandwich in a scene within the movie Quiz Show, where Richard N. Goodwin (known as Dick) orders and eats one in a restaurant with Charles van Doren, and they discuss the sandwich’s origins.

Reuben’s Delicatessen: New York City, New York
Another account holds that the Reuben’s creator was Arnold Reuben, the German-Jewish owner of Reuben’s Delicatessen (1908–2001) in New York City. According to an interview with Craig Claiborne, Arnold Reuben invented the “Reuben Special” around 1914. The earliest references in print to the sandwich are New York–based, but that is not conclusive evidence, though the fact that the earliest, in a 1926 issue of Theatre Magazine, references a “Reuben Special”, does seem to take its cue from Arnold Reuben’s menu.
A variation of the above account is related by Bernard Sobel in his 1953 book, Broadway Heartbeat: Memoirs of a Press Agent. Sobel states that the sandwich was an extemporaneous creation for Marjorie Rambeau inaugurated when the famed Broadway actress visited the Reuben’s Delicatessen one night when the cupboards were particularly bare.
Some sources name the actress in the above account as Annette Seelos, not Marjorie Rambeau, while also noting that the original “Reuben Special” sandwich of 1926 did not contain corned beef or sauerkraut and was not grilled.
Still other versions give credit to Alfred Scheuing, a chef at Reuben’s Delicatessen, and say he created the sandwich for Reuben’s son, Arnold Jr., in the 1930s.

Variations

Montreal Reuben
The Montreal Reuben substitutes Montreal-style smoked meat for corned beef.

Thousand Island dressing
Thousand Island dressing is commonly used as a substitute for Russian dressing.

Walleye Reuben
The walleye Reuben features the freshwater fish (Sander vitreus) in place of the corned beef. It is eaten in Minnesota and Ohio.

Grouper Reuben
The grouper Reuben is a variation on the standard Reuben sandwich, substituting grouper for the corned beef, and sometimes coleslaw for the sauerkraut as well. This variation is often a menu item in restaurants in Florida.

Reuben egg rolls
Reuben egg rolls, sometimes called “Irish egg rolls” or “Reuben balls”, use the standard Reuben sandwich filling of corned beef, sauerkraut, and cheese inside a deep-fried egg roll wrapper. Typically served with Thousand Island dressing (instead of Russian dressing) as an appetizer or snack, they originated at Mader’s, a German restaurant in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where chef Dennis Wegner created them for a summer festival circa 1990.

Rachel sandwich
The Rachel sandwich is a variation which substitutes pastrami or turkey for the corned beef, and coleslaw for the sauerkraut. Other recipes for the Rachel call for turkey instead of pastrami. In some parts of the United States, especially Michigan, this turkey variant is known as a “Georgia Reuben” or “California Reuben”, and it may also call for barbecue sauce or French dressing instead of Russian dressing. The name may have originated from the 1871 song “Reuben and Rachel”.

Vegetarian versions
Vegetarian versions, called “veggie Reubens”, omit the corned beef or substitute vegetarian ingredients for it, including zucchini, cucumbers, wheatmeat, mushrooms, tempeh, etc.

Corned beef Reuben sandwich

Kosher version
As the original Reuben contains both meat (corned beef) and dairy (Swiss cheese), it is not kosher. If kosher ingredients are used, a meat version can be made by omitting the cheese and any dairy ingredients in the dressing, and a dairy version can be made by omitting the meat.

 

Healthy Aging Recipes

March 7, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Aging Recipes. Delicious and Healthy Aging Recipes with recipes including Muffin-Tin Spinach and Mushroom Mini Quiches, Sheet-Pan Chili-Lime Salmon with Potatoes and Peppers, and Pressure Cooker “Corned” Beef and Cabbage. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Aging Recipes
Find healthy, delicious healthy aging recipes including breakfasts, lunches and dinners. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Muffin-Tin Spinach and Mushroom Mini Quiches
Switch up your morning routine with these easy vegetarian mini quiches. Earthy mushrooms and spinach pair nicely with rich and creamy Gruyère cheese. Serve them on a platter with a fresh fruit salad for a simple weekend brunch………………………

Sheet-Pan Chili-Lime Salmon with Potatoes and Peppers
Busy weeknights beg for something simple like this salmon sheet-pan dinner. Like the name suggests, it’s all cooked on one pan. The potatoes get a head start, followed by sweet bell peppers and finally chili-coated salmon fillets. It’s a complete meal with easy cleanup!……………………..

Pressure Cooker “Corned” Beef and Cabbage
Corned beef is brisket that has been pickled in spices for days. You can buy it ready-to-cook or corn your own at home, but both are serious sodium bombs, packing more than 500 mg per 3-ounce serving–nearly 25% of the recommended daily limit. For this healthier pressure cooker corned beef and cabbage, we start with a plain brisket and add seasonings ourselves to control the salt level. We also opt for a flat-cut end of brisket, instead of the thicker point cut, as it has less fat, making it easier to slice when cooked. An electric pressure cooker, such as an Instant Pot, is absolutely key to this recipe, allowing you to cook the brisket in one hour–as opposed to three hours or more in the oven. It also lets you sear and roast in one device, saving cleanup time………………………………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Aging Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18053/lifestyle-diets/healthy-aging/

Kitchen Closed: Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Potato Chips

June 29, 2019 at 6:29 PM | Posted in Izzy's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Potato Chips

 


For Breakfast I toasted a couple of Eggo’s – Nutrigrain Waffles. Topped both we some I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter and Log Cabin Sugarless Maple Syrup. Also prepared a 1/2 a Butterball Hardwood Smoked Turkey Sausage and had my Morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Mostly Sunny , Humid, and 92 Degrees outside today. After Breakfast I did a load of laundry then later got the cart out of the shed and got some yard work done. Put on plenty of sunscreen, that sun was hot! For Dinner tonight the Kitchen is Closed. : For Dinner tonight, Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Potato Chips.

 

 

 


With the Kitchen Closed it was Izzy’s tonight! I had an Izzy’s famous corned beef, 96% lean cut, on whole wheat bread. I also had some Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Chips along with a Diet Peach Snapple. There’s 360 calories and 32 carbs for a full sandwich. I had half of it and saved the other half for lunch tomorrow, half sandwich 170 calories and 16 carbs. Not only does it look delicious, it is delicious! Izzy’s by far has the best and most tender Corned Beef there is! I bought Mom a Reuben and Potato Pancake. For Dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding Cup topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

 

 

 

Izzy’s Lean

Izzy’s famous corned beef—96% lean cut— on whole wheat bread. Served with pasta salad.

http://izzys.com/

One of America’s Favorites – New England Boiled Dinner

November 5, 2018 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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New England boiled dinner is the basis of a traditional New England meal, consisting of corned beef or a smoked “picnic ham” shoulder, with cabbage and added vegetable items, often including potato, rutabaga, parsnip, carrot, white turnip, and onion. With a beef roast, this meal is often known simply as corned beef and cabbage. A similar Newfoundland dish is called a Jiggs dinner.

New England boiled dinner is a traditional meal on St. Patrick’s Day. Ireland produced a significant amount of the corned beef in the Atlantic trade from local cattle and salt imported from the

New England boiled dinner with cabbage, potato, white turnip, rutabaga, carrot, onion, and parsnip

Iberian Peninsula and southwestern France. Coastal cities, such as Dublin, Belfast, and Cork, created vast beef curing and packing industries, with Cork producing half of Ireland’s annual beef exports in 1668. Most of the people of Ireland during this period consumed little of the meat produced, in either fresh or salted form, due to its prohibitive cost. In the colonies the product was looked upon with disdain due to its association with poverty and slavery.

Corned beef was used as a substitute for bacon by Irish-American immigrants in the late 19th century. Corned beef and cabbage is the Irish-American variant of the original Irish dish of bacon and cabbage.

A “picnic ham” shoulder consists of the cured and smoked primal pork shoulder, which is cut from the lower portion of a hog’s foreleg still containing the arm and shank bones. The meat is then boiled with root vegetables for several hours or until it is tender. The resulting meat does not taste similar to a traditional ham.

Corned beef is prepared before the actual cooking of the meal by seasoning a cut of beef with salt (large grains of salt were known as corns) and spices and the natural meat juices. This meat is then placed whole, like a rump or pot roast into a crock pot, which in olden times was a ceramic pot over a fire, filled with cabbage and carrots, and, when available, red potatoes. However, after Luther Burbank’s alteration of potatoes, the potatoes were chopped when placed in the pot. Rutabaga or turnips are also common ingredients. This meal can be left in a crock pot all day but must be kept in the naturally humid environment of cooking meat. Corned beef and cabbage is often served as a whole meal.

Smoked shoulder is an exceptionally salty cut of meat. Two different methods of preparation are commonly used to decrease the amount of salt in the meat. In the first method, the meat is placed in a pot and soaked in a refrigerated cold water bath for one day prior to cooking. During the soak, the water is changed several times. The pot of meat and water is then boiled on the stovetop until the meat is tender. In the second method, the meat is placed in cold water and brought to a boil. The boiling water is then poured off, replaced with fresh cold water, and the ham is brought to a boil again. This process can be repeated several times, as deemed appropriate by the chef, before the meat is allowed to cook. A combination of both methods is also acceptable. This is a very easy meal to cook, as the salt and flavor of the meat require no additional seasonings. The ham generally must boil for several hours until it is ready to eat. The vegetables are placed in the pot and boiled with the meat; however, some chefs prefer to place them in the ham’s water after the meat has been removed to avoid overcooking.

Common condiments include horseradish, mustard, and cider vinegar.

 

Lunch Meat of the Week – Corned Beef

October 11, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Corned beef

Corned beef is a salt-cured beef product. The term comes from the treatment of the meat with large grained rock salt, also called “corns” of salt. It is featured as an ingredient in many cuisines.

Most recipes include nitrates or nitrites, which convert the natural myoglobin in beef to nitrosomyoglobin, giving a pink color. Nitrates and nitrites reduce the risk of dangerous botulism during curing by inhibiting the growth of Clostridium botulinum spores, but have been shown to be linked to increased cancer risk. Beef cured with salt only has a gray color and is sometimes called “New England corned beef.” Sometimes, sugar and spices are also added to corned beef recipes.

It was popular during World War I and World War II, when fresh meat was rationed. It also remains especially popular in Canada in a variety of dishes.

A corned beef on rye bread sandwich

Although the exact beginnings of corned beef are unknown, it most likely came about when people began preserving meat through salt-curing. Evidence of its legacy is apparent in numerous cultures, including ancient Europe and the Middle East. The word corn derives from Old English and is used to describe any small, hard particles or grains. In the case of corned beef, the word may refer to the coarse, granular salts used to cure the beef. The word “corned” may also refer to the corns of potassium nitrate, also known as saltpeter, which were formerly used to preserve the meat.

Corned beef on a bagel with mustard

In North America, corned beef dishes are associated with traditional Irish cuisine. However, considerable debate remains about the association of corned beef with Ireland. Mark Kurlansky, in his book Salt, states that the Irish produced a salted beef around the Middle Ages that was the “forerunner of what today is known as Irish corned beef” and in the 17th century, the English named the Irish salted beef “corned beef”.

Some say until the wave of 18th-century Irish immigration to the United States, many of the ethnic Irish had not begun to consume corned beef dishes as seen today. The popularity of corned beef compared to bacon among the immigrant Irish may have been due to corned beef being considered a luxury product in their native land, while it was cheaply and readily available in America.

The Jewish population produced similar salt-cured meat from beef brisket, which Irish immigrants purchased as corned beef from Jewish butchers. This may have been facilitated by the close cultural interactions and collaboration of these two diverse cultures in the United States’ main 19th- and 20th-century immigrant port of entry, New York City.

Corned beef hash out of the can

Canned corned beef has long been one of the standard meals included in military field ration packs around the world, due to its simplicity and instant preparation in such rations. One example is the American Meal, Ready-to-Eat (MRE) pack. Astronaut John Young sneaked a contraband corned beef sandwich on board Gemini 3, hiding it in a pocket of his spacesuit.

 

Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Potato Chips

September 5, 2018 at 5:21 PM | Posted in Izzy's | 4 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Potato Chips

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I toasted a couple of slices of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread and topped them with Smucker’s Sugar Free Blackberry Jam. Also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Then at 11:00 I had to go to my family Doctor. My last visit for my Blood Work showed a increased Sugar count. So they are changing my increasing my Medication. The last few months have really been stressful so that didn’t help my readings any. And now it looks as though I’m losing my Supplement Insurance because I’m an Amputee, which I was when I first got the policy back in 2002. Then Thursday I have to be back at the Dentist Office for Dental Work. Too much going on, the bad way in my life right now. But it’s like they say “It could be worse”. So I didn’t really plan on anything for dinner but one thing kept sounding good with no prep by me, Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich! So with the Kitchen closed tonight it was Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Potato Chips.

 


I just love Izzy’s Sandwiches! I would put Izzy’s Corned Beef up against any other. Plus with their “Lean’ version of the Corned Beef it makes it healthier also. The sandwich contains 170 calories and 16 carbs per serving (1/2 Sandwich) and 340 calories and 32 carbs for a Full Sandwich. I had the Full, as usual, along with a serving of Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Potato Chips and their 80 calories and 17 carbs per serving, I had a 1/2 serving. For Dessert/Snack later some Honey Crisp Apple slices.

 

 

 


Izzy’s

Izzy’s famous corned beef—96% lean cut— on whole wheat bread. Served with pasta salad
Calories/ Carbs
170/16 (1/2 Sandwich) 340/32 (Full Sandwich)
http://izzys.com/

Diabetic Dish of the Week – REUBEN BITES PARTY APPETIZER

July 24, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is – REUBEN BITES PARTY APPETIZER. Corned beef that’s topped with Swiss cheese, Sauerkraut and Thousand Island Dressing. Perfect family Appetizer, snack, or for your your next party! You can find this recipe at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine! At the Diabetic Gourmet site you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly recipes for your Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, or Dessert menus. So check it out today. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

REUBEN BITES PARTY APPETIZER
A short stack of corned beef is topped with Swiss cheese, sauerkraut and Thousand Island dressing. All the big tastes of a classic Reuben sandwich in an appetizer-sized portion. You can also use left-over corned beef from St. Patrick’s Day or even kick it up a notch by using pastrami. Perfect for a party – a real crowd pleaser.

Recipe Yield: 32

Ingredients

12 ounces thinly sliced deli Corned Beef
1/2 cup Thousand Island dressing, divided
8 slices rye, swirl rye or pumpernickel bread
4 slices Swiss cheese (about 3/4 ounce each)
1 cup drained sauerkraut

Directions

1 – Preheat oven to 425F.
2 – Spread 2 teaspoons dressing on each bread slice; cut slices into quarters.
3 – Place bread pieces in a single layer on 2 baking sheets.
4 – Bake 9 to 11 minutes or until bread is lightly toasted, rotating baking sheets half way through baking.
5 – Meanwhile, cut cheese slices into quarters; cut each quarter diagonally in half to form 32 triangles.
6 – Top bread pieces evenly with Corned Beef, cheese slices and sauerkraut.
7 – Heat appetizers in 425F oven 3 to 5 minutes or until cheese is melted.
8 – Top evenly with remaining Thousand Island dressing.

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 53
Fat: 2 grams
Saturated Fat: 1 grams
Fiber: .6 grams
Sodium: 236 milligrams
Cholesterol: 9 milligrams
Protein: 4 grams
Carbohydrates: 5 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/reuben-bites-party-appetizer

Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Chips

November 14, 2017 at 5:55 PM | Posted in Izzy's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Chips

 

For Breakfast this morning I made some Simply Potatoes Shredded Hash Browns, Heated up some Meijer Diced Ham, fried an Egg Sunnyside Up, made a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. I made a bed of the Hashbrowns in a bowl and sprinkled some Sargento Reduced Fat Sharp Cheddar Cheese. Next I put the Diced Ham over top the Hash Browns then put the Sunnyside Up Egg on to top it off. One of my favorite Breakfasts! 33 degrees out there this morning. Plenty of sunshine today and had a high of 46 degrees. Got the cart out of the shed along with the leaf blower. Took care of some final yard work for the year then used the leaf blower and cleaned off the deck and driveway areas. Nice to be outside taking in all the sunshine! So the Kitchen is closed tonight it was Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Chips for Dinner tonight.

 

I would put Izzy’s Corned Beef up against any other. Plus with their “Lean’ version of the Corned Beef it makes it healthier also. The sandwich contains 170 calories and 16 carbs per serving (1/2 Sandwich) and 340 calories and 32 carbs for a Full Sandwich. I had the Full, as usual, along with a serving of Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Potato Chips. Then to go along with it all I had an ice-cold Diet Dr. Pepper, 0 calories and 0 carbs. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Double Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

Izzy’s Izzy’s

Izzy’s famous corned beef—96% lean cut— on whole wheat bread. Served with pasta salad
Calories/ Carbs
170/16 (1/2 Sandwich) 340/32 (Full Sandwich)
http://izzys.com/

Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Chips

October 28, 2017 at 4:56 PM | Posted in Izzy's | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Chips

 

 

To start the morning off I toasted a Healthy Life Whole Grain English Muffin and Poached an Egg. I also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. After Breakfast I started a load of laundry for Mom and then it was on to house cleaning, vacuumed and dusted. Later on got the hand vacuum out and vacuumed my car and Mom’s car, both needed it! This morning it was about 32 degrees with a mix of rain and snow! Our first sign of the white 4 letter word! Only had a high today of 44 degrees. Did a few chores around the house and watched some College Football later in the afternoon. I’m shutting down the Kitchen today So with the Kitchen closed tonight it was Izzy’s Lean Corned Beef Sandwich w/ Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Chips.

 

I would put Izzy’s Corned Beef up against any other. Plus with their “Lean’ version of the Corned Beef it makes it healthier also. The sandwich contains 170 calories and 16 carbs per serving (1/2 Sandwich) and 340 calories and 32 carbs for a Full Sandwich. I had the Full, as usual, along with a serving of Ruffle’s Reduced Fat Potato Chips. Then to go along with it all I had an ice-cold Diet Dr. Pepper, 0 calories and 0 carbs. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

 

 

 

 

 

Izzy’s Izzy’s

Izzy’s famous corned beef—96% lean cut— on whole wheat bread. Served with pasta salad
Calories/ Carbs
170/16 (1/2 Sandwich) 340/32 (Full Sandwich)
http://izzys.com/

One of America’s Favorites – New England Boiled Dinner

August 28, 2017 at 5:34 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

New England boiled dinner is the basis of a traditional New England meal, consisting of corned beef or a smoked “picnic ham” shoulder, with cabbage and added vegetable items, often including potato, rutabaga, parsnip, carrot, white turnip, and onion. With a beef roast, this meal is often known simply as corned beef and cabbage. A similar Newfoundland dish is called a Jiggs dinner.

New England boiled dinner

New England boiled dinner is a traditional meal on St. Patrick’s Day. Ireland produced a significant amount of the corned beef in the Atlantic trade from local cattle and salt imported from the Iberian Peninsula and southwestern France. Coastal cities, such as Dublin, Belfast, and Cork, created vast beef curing and packing industries, with Cork producing half of Ireland’s annual beef exports in 1668. Most of the people of Ireland during this period consumed little of the meat produced, in either fresh or salted form, due to its prohibitive cost. In the colonies the product was looked upon with disdain due to its association with poverty and slavery.

Corned beef was used as a substitute for bacon by Irish-American immigrants in the late 19th century. Corned beef and cabbage is the Irish-American variant of the original Irish dish of bacon and cabbage.

A “picnic ham” shoulder consists of the cured and smoked primal pork shoulder, which is cut from the lower portion of a hog’s foreleg still containing the arm and shank bones. The meat is then boiled with root vegetables for several hours or until it is tender. The resulting meat does not taste similar to a traditional ham.

Corned beef is prepared before the actual cooking of the meal by seasoning a cut of beef with salt (large grains of salt were known as corns) and spices and the natural meat juices. This meat is then placed whole, like a rump or pot roast into a crock pot, which in olden times was a ceramic pot over a fire, filled with cabbage and carrots, and, when available, red potatoes. However, after Luther Burbank’s alteration of potatoes, the potatoes were chopped when placed in the pot. Rutabaga or turnips are also common ingredients. This meal can be left in a crock pot all day but must be kept in the naturally humid environment of cooking meat. Corned beef and cabbage is often served as a whole meal.

Smoked shoulder is an exceptionally salty cut of meat. Two different methods of preparation are commonly used to decrease the amount of salt in the meat. In the first method, the meat is placed in a pot and soaked in a refrigerated cold water bath for one day prior to cooking. During the soak, the water is changed several times. The pot of meat and water is then boiled on the stovetop until the meat is tender. In the second method, the meat is placed in cold water and brought to a boil. The boiling water is then poured off, replaced with fresh cold water, and the ham is brought to a boil again. This process can be repeated several times, as deemed appropriate by the chef, before the meat is allowed to cook. A combination of both methods is also acceptable. This is a very easy meal to cook, as the salt and flavor of the meat require no additional seasonings. The ham generally must boil for several hours until it is ready to eat. The vegetables are placed in the pot and boiled with the meat; however, some chefs prefer to place them in the ham’s water after the meat has been removed to avoid overcooking.

Common condiments include horseradish, mustard, and cider vinegar.

 

 

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