MELON BANANA SORBET

April 29, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Gourmet Magazine | Leave a comment
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I have a recipe for a MELON BANANA SORBET. To make this SORBET you’ll be needing Cantaloupe, Banana, Splenda Sugar Blend, Corn Syrup, Creme de Menthe Liqueur, Lime Juice, Grated Lime Peel, and Ground Cinnamon. The Sorbet 80 calories and 19 carbs per serving. So you can find this Diabetic Friendly recipe and more all at the Diabetic Gourmet Magazine website. You can also sign up to receive wonderful recipes, engaging articles, helpful and healthful tips, critically important news and more. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://diabeticgourmet.com/

MELON BANANA SORBET
Here’s a frozen treat to keep on hand for hot days or July 4th parties. Recipe for Melon Banana Sorbet from our Desserts recipe section.

Ingredients

1 small cantaloupe, peeled, seeded, and cut into chunks
1 banana, sliced
1/4 cup Splenda Sugar Blend
2 tablespoons corn syrup
2 teaspoons creme de menthe liqueur
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
2 teaspoons grated lime peel
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Directions

1 – In a food processor or blender, combine all ingredients.
2 – Process until smooth, then scrape into an ice-cream maker and freeze according to manufacturer’s directions. Or scrape into a shallow metal pan, cover, and freeze 4 to 6 hours.
3 – Break mixture into chunks and pulse 10 to 20 seconds in the food processor or just until no longer chunky and somewhat creamy in texture. Freeze up to 1 month. Pulse briefly in the food processor just before serving.

NOTES:
Here’s a frozen treat to keep on hand for hot days.

Recipe Yield: Yield: 8 servings

Serving Size: 2/3 cup

NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION PER SERVING:
Calories: 80
Fiber: 1 grams
Sodium: 10 milligrams
Protein: 1 grams
Carbohydrates: 19 grams
Sugars: 9 grams
https://diabeticgourmet.com/diabetic-recipe/melon-banana-sorbet

Condiment of the Week – Corn Syrup

February 25, 2016 at 6:04 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | Leave a comment
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Dark corn syrup in commercial packaging.

Dark corn syrup in commercial packaging.

Corn syrup is a food syrup which is made from the starch of maize (called corn in some countries) and contains varying amounts of maltose and higher oligosaccharides, depending on the grade. Corn syrup is used in foods to soften texture, add volume, prevent crystallization of sugar, and enhance flavor. Corn syrup is distinct from high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which is manufactured from corn syrup by converting a large proportion of its glucose into fructose using the enzyme D-xylose isomerase, thus producing a sweeter compound due to higher levels of fructose.

The more general term glucose syrup is often used synonymously with corn syrup, since glucose syrup is in the United States most commonly made from corn starch. Technically, glucose syrup is any liquid starch hydrolysate of mono-, di-, and higher-saccharides and can be made from any source of starch; wheat, tapioca and potatoes are the most common other sources.

 
Historically, corn syrup was produced by combining corn starch with dilute hydrochloric acid, and then heating the mixture under pressure. The process was invented by Gottlieb Kirchhoff in 1812. Currently, corn syrup is obtained through a multi-step bioprocess. First, the enzyme α-amylase is added to a mixture of corn starch and water. α-amylase is secreted by various species of the bacterium Bacillus and the enzyme is isolated from the liquid in which the bacteria were grown. The enzyme breaks down the starch into oligosaccharides, which are then broken into glucose molecules by adding the enzyme glucoamylase, known also as “γ-amylase”. Glucoamylase is secreted by various species of the fungus Aspergillus; the enzyme is isolated from the liquid in which the fungus is grown. The glucose can then be transformed into fructose by passing the glucose through a column that is loaded with the enzyme D-xylose isomerase, an enzyme that is isolated from the growth medium of any of several bacteria.

Corn syrup is produced from number 2 yellow dent corn. When wet milled, about 2.3 litres of corn are required to yield an average of 947g of starch, to produce 1 kg of glucose or dextrose syrup. A bushel (25 kg) of corn will yield an average of 31.5 pounds (14.3 kg) of starch, which in turn will yield about 33.3 pounds (15.1 kg) of syrup. Thus, it takes about 2,300 litres of corn to produce a tonne of glucose syrup, or 60 bushels (1524 kg) of corn to produce one short ton.

The viscosity and sweetness of the syrup depends on the extent to which the hydrolysis reaction has been carried out. To distinguish different grades of syrup, they are rated according to their dextrose equivalent (DE). Most commercially available corn syrups are approximately 1/3 glucose by weight.

Two common commercial corn syrup products are light and dark corn syrup.

Light corn syrup is corn syrup seasoned with vanilla flavor and salt. Light corn syrup is clear and tastes moderately sweet.
Dark corn syrup is a combination of corn syrup and molasses (or Refiners’ syrup), caramel color and flavor, salt, and the preservative sodium benzoate. Dark corn syrup is a warm brown color and tastes much stronger than light corn syrup. Molasses in dark corn syrup enhances its flavor and color. This product is very useful in science experiments like the Seven layers density column.

 

 

Karo advertisement, 1917.

Karo advertisement, 1917.

Corn syrup’s major uses in commercially prepared foods are as a thickener, a sweetener and as a humectant – an ingredient that retains moisture and thus maintains a food’s freshness.

In the United States, cane sugar quotas raise the price of sugar; hence, domestically produced corn syrup and high-fructose corn syrup are less costly alternatives that are often used in American-made processed and mass-produced foods, candies, soft drinks and fruit drinks.

Glucose syrup was the primary corn sweetener in the United States prior to the expanded use of high fructose corn syrup production. HFCS is a variant in which other enzymes are used to convert some of the glucose into fructose. The resulting syrup is sweeter and more soluble. Corn syrup is also available as a retail product.

If mixed with sugar, water and cream of tartar corn syrup can be used to make sugar glass.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

July 8, 2015 at 5:04 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Thank you to Grand Ma Ginny for passing this tip along to share…….
For moist, chewy brownies, add 2 tablespoons of corn syrup to your batter before baking

Pecan Pie (Slimmed Down Version)

October 18, 2013 at 9:37 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes | Leave a comment
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Thank you Anthony “The Cook” for passing this one along!

 

 

Pecan Pie

Ingredients:

3 large eggs, lightly beaten or (3/4 Cup Egg Beater’s)
3/4 cup Splenda Brown Sugar Blend, firmly packed
3/4 cup light corn syrup
2 tablespoons butter, melted (Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 1/2 cups pecan halves
1 (9 inch) unbaked pastry shell
Directions:

Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C).
Combine eggs, Splenda Brown Sugar Blend, corn syrup, butter and vanilla, mixing until blended; stir in pecan halves. Pour filling into pastry shell.
Bake for 45-50 minutes or until a knife inserted near center comes out clean.
Cool on a wire rack. Serve warm.
Makes 8 servings.

Pili Brittle

March 12, 2012 at 8:55 AM | Posted in dessert, diabetes, nuts | Leave a comment
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PILI BRITTLE

Ingredients:
1 cup pilinut 1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. margarine 8 tbsp. sugar
4 tspb. Water 4 tbsp. corn syrup

Procedure:
1. Dry pilinut under the sun or in a mechanical dryer. Cool and remove seed coats.
2. Combine pilinut, sugar, water and corn syrup in a pan.
3. Cook over medium heat until syrup turns golden brown or when threading occurs. Remove from heat.
4. Add margarine and mix well.
5. Add baking soda and stir thoroughly.
6. Spread on grease wooden board and cut while hot into desired sizes.
7. Wrap in cellophane when cooled.

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