NATIONAL CORNBREAD FESTIVAL April 28th and 29th SOUTH PITTSBURG, TN

April 25, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,

SOUTH PITTSBURG, TN ¬- This year on April 28th and 29th, over 25,000 festival-goers from throughout the southeast gather here to enjoy the sights, sounds and tastes of the 22nd Annual National Cornbread Festival. Located 30 miles west of Chattanooga, TN, this quaint southern town hosts a celebration of cornbread, often considered the cornerstone of southern cuisine. Be sure to check out this year’s schedule of events, line up of musical artist, and craft and food vendors. We’ll see you there!

The National Cornbread Festival is a weekend-long celebration of cornbread and many cornbread related activities for adults and kids. You’ll find us in the quaint town of South Pittsburg, Tennessee every year during the last full weekend in April.

COME AND ENJOY:
* National Lodge® Cast Iron Cornbread Cook-off
* Cornbread Alley (sample various cornbread recipes)
* Live music throughout the festival
* Arts and Crafts from area vendors
* Tours of the Lodge Cast Iron Foundry
* Cornbread 5K Race
* Tours of historic South Pittsburg
* Classic Car Cruise-In
* Cornbread Eating Contests

Play games, ride carnival rides, and enjoy wandering through the booths that line the streets of historic South Pittsburg. Enjoy cornbread, handmade arts and crafts. Taste Southern, artisan treats like honey, fudge, and rock candies. The festival is packed with great family fun – including a Kid’s Corner with games, face painting, and inflatables!
http://nationalcornbread.com/

Advertisements

Maize Dishes – Grits

February 22, 2015 at 6:25 AM | Posted in Maize Dishes | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Grits

Grits

Grits refers to a ground-corn food of Native American origin that is common in the Southern United States and eaten mainly at breakfast. Modern grits are commonly made of alkali-treated corn known as hominy.

Grits are similar to other thick maize-based porridges from around the world such as polenta. “Instant grits” have been processed to speed cooking.

The word “grits” derives from the Old English word “grytt,” meaning coarse meal. This word originally referred to wheat and other porridges now known as groats in parts of the UK. Maize, unknown in Europe in the Middle Ages, is a food derived from corn. (In U.S. English, corn is a specific New World plant; however, “corn” is used generically to describe cereal grains in the U.K. and in many European regions.) “Grits” may be either singular or plural. Historically, in the American South the word was invariably singular notwithstanding its plural form (cf. food names such as “spaghetti” or “linguine”, also plural in form).

 

 

 

Grits with cheese, bacon, green onion and poached egg

Grits with cheese, bacon, green onion and poached egg

Grits have their origin in Native American corn preparation. Traditionally, the hominy for grits was ground on a stone mill. The ground hominy is then passed through screens, the finer sifted material used as grit meal, and the coarser as grits. Many American communities used a gristmill until the mid-twentieth century, farmers bringing their corn to be ground, and the miller keeping a portion as his fee. State law in South Carolina, requires grits and corn meal to be enriched, similar to the requirement for flour, unless the grits are made from the corn a miller kept as his fee.

Three-quarters of grits sold in the U.S. are bought in the South, in an area stretching from Texas to Virginia that is sometimes called the “grits belt”. The state of Georgia declared grits its official prepared food in 2002. Similar bills have been introduced in South Carolina, with one declaring:

Whereas, throughout its history, the South has relished its grits, making them a symbol of its diet, its customs, its humor, and its hospitality, and whereas, every community in the State of South Carolina used to be the site of a grits mill and every local economy in the State used to be dependent on its product; and whereas, grits has been a part of the life of every South Carolinian of whatever race, background, gender, and income; and whereas, grits could very well play a vital role in the future of not only this State, but also the world, if as Charleston’s The Post and Courier proclaimed in 1952, “An inexpensive, simple, and thoroughly digestible food, grits should be made popular throughout the world. Given enough of it, the inhabitants of planet Earth would have nothing to fight about. A man full of grits is a man of peace.”

In the South Carolina Low Country, the uncooked ground corn is known as “grist”, and the cooked dish is “hominy”. This is distinct from the usual use of the term hominy.

 

 

 

 

Grits are either yellow or white, depending on the color of corn. The most common version in supermarkets is “quick” grits, which have the germ and hull removed. Whole kernel grits are sometimes called “Speckled”. Grits are prepared by boiling the ground kernels into a porridge until enough water has been absorbed or vaporized to leave it semi-solid.

 

 

 
Whole kernel grits are prepared by adding five or six parts boiling water (seasoned with salt – 1/4 tsp for each cup of water) to one part grits and cooking for 20 to 30 minutes. Grits expand when cooked and need periodic stirring to prevent sticking and lumps forming. Grits are most typically served seasoned with salt and pepper, as well as generous amounts of butter. On occasion they are served with grated cheese, sausage, bacon, or red-eye gravy. Grits may also be seasoned with butter and sugar, and a small amount of salt, giving them a salty-sweet flavor similar to kettlecorn.

 

 

 

 

Prepared grits

Prepared grits

Although usually eaten with eggs and bacon, grits may also accompany fried catfish or salmon croquettes.

Shrimp and grits is a traditional dish in the Low Country of coastal Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, Louisiana, South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia and Virginia. It is a traditional breakfast dish.

“Charleston-style grits” are boiled in milk instead of water, giving them a creamy consistency.

Solidified cooked grits may be sliced and fried directly in vegetable oil, butter, or bacon grease, or they may first be breaded in beaten egg and bread crumbs.

 

Maize Dishes – Cornbread

February 15, 2015 at 6:27 AM | Posted in Maize Dishes | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
Skillet cornbread

Skillet cornbread

Native Americans were using ground corn (maize) for food thousands of years before European explorers arrived in the New World. European settlers, especially those who resided in the southern English colonies, learned the original recipes and processes for corn dishes from the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, and Creek, and soon they devised recipes for using cornmeal in breads similar to those made of grains available in Europe. Cornbread has been called a “cornerstone” of Southern United States cuisine. Cornmeal is produced by grinding dry raw corn grains. A coarser meal (compare flour) made from corn is grits. Grits are produced by soaking raw corn grains in hot water containing calcium hydroxide (the alkaline salt), which loosens the grain hulls (bran) and increases the nutritional value of the product (by increasing available niacin and available amino acids). These are separated by washing and flotation in water, and the now softened slightly swelled grains are called hominy. Hominy, posole in Spanish, also is ground into masa harina for tamales and tortillas). This ancient Native American technology has been named nixtamalization. Besides cornbread, Native Americans used corn to make numerous other dishes from the familiar hominy grits to alcoholic beverages (such as Andean chicha). Cornbread was popular during the American Civil War because it was very cheap and could be made in many different forms—high-rising, fluffy loaves or simply fried (as unleavened pone, corn fritters, hoecakes, etc.)

 

 

Types of cornbread

Cornbread, prepared as a muffin

Cornbread, prepared as a muffin

Cornbread is a popular item in soul food enjoyed by many people for its texture and aroma. Cornbread can be baked, fried or, rarely, steamed. Steamed cornbread is mushy, chewier and more like cornmeal pudding than what most consider to be traditional cornbread. Cornbread can also be baked into corn cakes.

Baked cornbread
Cornbread is a common bread in United States cuisine, particularly associated with the South and Southwest, as well as being a traditional staple for populations where wheat flour was more expensive. In some parts of the South it is crumbled into a glass of cold milk or buttermilk and eaten with a spoon, and it is also widely eaten with barbecue and chili con carne. In parts of the southern and southwestern United States, cornbread, accompanied by pinto beans, has been a common lunch for many people. It is still a common side dish, often served with homemade butter, chunks of onion or scallions. Cornbread crumbs are also used in some poultry stuffings; cornbread stuffing is particularly associated with Thanksgiving turkeys.

In the United States, northern and southern cornbread are different because they generally use different types of corn meal and varying degrees of sugar and eggs. Southern cornbread has traditionally been made with little or no sugar and smaller amounts flour or no flour, with northern cornbread being sweeter and more cakelike. Southern cornbread traditionally used white cornmeal and buttermilk. Other ingredients such as pork rinds are sometimes used. Cornbread is occasionally crumbled and served with cold milk or clabber (buttermilk), similar to cold cereal. In Texas, the Mexican influence has spawned a hearty cornbread made with fresh or creamed corn kernels and jalapeño peppers and topped with shredded cheese.

Skillet-fried or skillet-baked cornbread (often simply called skillet bread or hoecake depending on the container in which it is cooked) is a traditional staple in the rural United States, especially in the South. This involves heating bacon drippings, lard or other oil in a heavy, well-seasoned cast iron skillet in an oven, and then pouring a batter made from cornmeal, egg, and milk directly into the hot grease. The mixture is returned to the oven to bake into a large, crumbly and sometimes very moist cake with a crunchy crust. This bread tends to be dense and is usually served as an accompaniment rather than as a bread served as a regular course. In addition to the skillet method, such cornbread also may be made in sticks, muffins, or loaves.

A slightly different variety, cooked in a simple baking dish, is associated with northern U.S. cuisine; it tends to be sweeter and lighter than southern-style cornbread; the batter for northern-style cornbread is very similar to and sometimes interchangeable with that of a corn muffin. A typical contemporary northern U.S. cornbread recipe contains half wheat flour, half cornmeal, milk or buttermilk, eggs, leavening agent, salt, and usually sugar, resulting in a bread that is somewhat lighter and sweeter than the traditional southern version. In the border states and parts of the Upper South, a cross between the two traditions is known as “light cornbread.”

Unlike fried variants of cornbread, baked cornbread is a quick bread that is dependent on an egg-based protein matrix for its structure (though the addition of wheat flour adds gluten to increase its cohesiveness). The baking process gelatinizes the starch in the cornmeal, but still often leaves some hard starch to give the finished product a distinctive sandiness not typical of breads made from other grains.
Corn pone
Corn pone (sometimes referred to as “Indian pone”) is a type of cornbread made from a thick, malleable cornmeal dough (which is usually egg-less and milk-less) and baked in a specific type of iron pan over an open fire (such as a frontiersman would use), using butter, margarine, Crisco (shortening), or cooking oil. Corn pones have been a staple of Southern U.S. cuisine, and have been discussed by many American writers, including Mark Twain.

In the Appalachian Mountains, cornbread baked in a round iron skillet, or in a cake pan of any shape, is still referred to as a “pone” of cornbread (as opposed to “hoe cakes,” the term for cornbread fried in pancake style); and when biscuit dough (i.e., “biscuits” in the American sense of the word) is occasionally baked in one large cake rather than as separate biscuits, this is called a “biscuit pone.”

The term “corn pone” is sometimes used derogatorily to refer to one who possesses certain rural, unsophisticated peculiarities (“he’s a corn pone”), or as an adjective to describe particular rural, folksy or “hick” characteristics (e.g., “corn pone” humor). This pejorative term often is directed at persons from rural areas of the southern and midwestern US. A character in the Lil’ Abner comic strip, General Jubilation T Cornpone, was a mythical Civil War general from Dogpatch known for his retreats and imputed cowardice. President John F. Kennedy’s staffers, who were mostly Northeastern Ivy League elites, openly mocked Texan Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson’s rural speech patterns, referring to Johnson behind his back as ‘Uncle Cornpone’ or ‘Rufus Cornpone’.

Home baked cornbread made with blue cornmeal

Home baked cornbread made with blue cornmeal

Hot water cornbread
Cooked on a rangetop, one frying method involves pouring a small amount of liquid batter made with boiling water and self-rising cornmeal (cornmeal with soda or some other chemical leavener added) into a skillet of hot oil, and allowing the crust to turn golden and crunchy while the center of the batter cooks into a crumbly, mushy bread. These small (3-4″ diameter) fried breads are soft and very rich. Sometimes, to ensure the consistency of the bread, a small amount of wheat flour is added to the batter. This type of cornbread is often known as “hot water” or “scald meal” cornbread and is unique to the American South.

Johnnycakes
Pouring a batter similar to that of skillet-fried cornbread, but slightly thinner, into hot grease atop a griddle or a skillet produces a pancake-like bread called a johnnycake. This type of cornbread is prevalent in New England, particularly in Rhode Island, and also in the American Midwest and the American South. It is reminiscent of the term hoecake, used in the American South for fried cornbread pancakes, which may date back to stories about some people on the frontier making cornbread patties on the blade of a hoe.

Hushpuppies
A thicker buttermilk-based batter that is deep-fried rather than pan-fried, forms the hushpuppy, a common accompaniment to fried fish and other seafood in the South. Hushpuppy recipes vary from state to state, some including onion seasoning, chopped onions, beer, or jalapeños. Fried properly, the hushpuppy will be moist and yellow or white on the inside, while crunchy and light to medium-dark golden brown on the outside.

 

Maize Dishes – Corn Dogs

February 1, 2015 at 6:40 AM | Posted in Maize Dishes | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , ,

A corn dog is a hot dog sausage coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter.

Corn dog on stick

Corn dog on stick

Corn dogs are often served as street food or as fast food. Some vendors or restaurateurs dip and fry their dogs just before serving. Corn dogs can also be found at almost any supermarket in North America as frozen food that can be heated and served. Some corn dog purveyors sell these premade frozen corn dogs which have been thawed and then fried again or browned in an oven. Premade frozen corn dogs can also be heated in a microwave oven, but the cornbread coating will lack texture. Corn dogs may be eaten plain or with a variety of condiments, with mustard being the most popular.

 

A variation is prepared with either melted cheese between the hot dog and the breading or the hot dog is replaced with a cheese-filled hot dog.

Another version is the “cornbrat” (or “corn brat”), which is a corn dog made with bratwurst instead of a wiener or hot dog. They are also sold in varieties of different hot dogs such as pork and turkey.

 

Small corn dogs, known as “corn puppies,” “mini corn dogs,” or “corn dog nuggets,” are a variation served in some

restaurants, generally on the children’s menu or at fast food establishments. A serving includes multiple pieces, usually 10. In contrast to their larger counterparts, corn puppies are normally served stickless as finger food.

A breakfast version features a breakfast sausage in place of the hot dog, and pancake batter in place of the cornmeal. This variation is commonly called a “pancake on a stick”. It was formerly served by drive-in restaurant Sonic®, but now is made by companies like Jimmy Dean®.

 

Corn dog with mustard

Corn dog with mustard

Both vegetarian corn dogs and corn dog nuggets are made as meatless alternatives by many of the same companies that produce vegetarian hot dogs.

 

National Corndog Day is a celebration of the corn dog, tater tots, and American beer that occurs on the first Saturday of March of every year.

 

Seafood of the Week – Fried Clams

July 1, 2014 at 5:34 AM | Posted in seafood, Seafood of the Week | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Fried clams piled high

Fried clams piled high

Fried clams are made by deep frying clams that have been dipped in milk and then flour.

Fried clams are an iconic food, “to New England what barbecue is to the South”. They tend to be served at seaside clam shacks (roadside restaurants). For a lighter meal, a clam roll is made by piling clams into a hot dog bun. Tartar sauce is the usual condiment.

 

 

 
The clams are dipped in evaporated milk, and coated with a combination of regular, corn, and/or pastry flour. Then the coated clams are fried in canola oil or soybean oil, or lard. They can be “clam strips” (sliced parts of hard-shell clams) or “clams with bellies” (whole soft-shell clams). Clams with bellies have the clam’s gastrointestinal tract left intact and impart a fuller flavor. However, some restaurants remove the clam’s chewy siphon, called the neck.

 

 

 
Fried clams have been served since at least 1865, and most likely earlier, as they have been found on an 1865 menu from the Parker House hotel restaurant in Boston, Massachusetts. It is not known if the clams were deep fried or if they were batter dipped. The same 1865 menu offers “oysters fried” and “oysters fried in batter”.

Legend has it that the modern deep-fried, breaded version was credited to Lawrence Henry “Chubby” Woodman from Essex, Massachusetts. He is said to have created the first batch on July 3, 1916, in his small roadside restaurant, now Woodman’s of Essex. One of his specialties was homemade potato chips, so he had large vats for deep-frying foods. He used the clams, which he had collected himself from the mud flats of the Essex River located close to his home.

Later, Thomas Soffron, of Soffron Brothers Clam Co., based in Ipswich, Massachusetts, created clam strips, which are made from the “foot” of hard-shelled sea clams. He sold these to Howard Johnson’s in an exclusive deal, and as the chain expanded, they became popular throughout the country.

 

 

 
Clams in themselves are low in cholesterol and fat, but fried clams absorb cooking fat.

 

 
Here’s just one of many Fried Clams Recipe
Fried Clams

 

Ingredients:

 

1 1/2 lbs. large shucked clams
2 cups corn flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. each onion and garlic powder
1 tbsp. fine yellow corn meal (optional)
1 can evaporated milk
1 egg yolk
oil for frying

 

Directions:

1 -Stir together the corn flour, salt, onion and garlic powder and yellow corn
meal until very well mixed. Divide the mixture in two shallow pans.
In another shallow pan, whisk together milk and egg yolk until well
combined.

2 – Dredge the whole clams in the first pan of corn flour mixture, then dip
them in the milk mixture. Toss the clams in the second pan of corn flour
mixture, then fry in 365°F oil until the clams are a golden color, turning
once. Remove from fryer and toss on clean absorbent paper. Season
lightly with salt and serve immediately. Do not overload the fryer with too
many clams if it has a low capacity or the oil temperature will be dropped
causing the clams to absorb more oil.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

June 17, 2014 at 5:31 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , ,

Thank you Connie for sending me this one to share!

 
To make your own corn meal mix: combine 1 cup corn meal, 1 cup all-purpose flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 4 teaspoons baking powder. You can store it in a tightly covered container for up to 6 months.

One of America’s Favorites – Corn Dogs

January 27, 2014 at 8:29 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 11 Comments
Tags: , , , ,

A corn dog is a hot dog sausage coated in a thick layer of cornmeal batter, typically deep fried and served on a stick.

Corn dog on stick

Corn dog on stick

 

 

 

Newly-arrived German Texan sausage-makers, finding resistance to the sausages they used to make, have been credited with introducing the corn dog to the United States, though the serving stick came later. A US patent filed in 1927, granted in 1929, for a Combined Dipping, Cooking, and Article Holding Apparatus, describes corn dogs, among other fried food impaled on a stick; it reads in part:
I have discovered that articles of food such, for instance, as wieners, boiled ham, hard boiled eggs, cheese, sliced peaches, pineapples, bananas and like fruit, and cherries, dates, figs, strawberries, etc., when impaled on sticks and dipped in batter, which includes in its ingredients a self rising flour, and then deep fried in a vegetable oil at a temperature of about 390°F., the resultant food product on a stick for a handle is a clean, wholesome and tasty refreshment.
In 300 Years of Kitchen Collectibles, author Linda Campbell Franklin states that a “Krusty Korn Dog baker” machine appeared in the 1929 Albert Pick-L. Barth wholesale catalog of hotel and restaurant supplies. The ‘korn dogs’ were baked in a corn batter and resembled ears of corn when cooked.
A number of current corn dog vendors claim credit for the invention and/or popularization of the corn dog. Carl and Neil Fletcher lay such a claim, having introduced their “Corny Dogs” at the Texas State Fair sometime between 1938 and 1942. The Pronto Pup vendors at the Minnesota State Fair claim to have invented the corn dog in 1941. Cozy Dog Drive-in, in Springfield, Illinois, claims to have been the first to serve corn dogs on sticks, on June 16, 1946. Also in 1946, Dave Barham opened the first location of Hot Dog on a Stick at Muscle Beach, Santa Monica, California.

 

 

 

Corn dog with mustard

Corn dog with mustard

Corn dogs are often served as street food or as fast food. Some vendors or restaurateurs dip and fry their dogs just before serving. Corn dogs can also be found at almost any supermarket in North America as frozen food that can be heated and served. Some corn dog purveyors sell these premade frozen corn dogs which have been thawed and then fried again or browned in an oven. Premade frozen corn dogs can also be microwaved, but the cornbread coating will lack texture. Corn dogs may be eaten plain or with a variety of condiments, such as ketchup, mustard, relish and mayonnaise.

 

 

 

"Corny Dogs" as sold at the Texas State Fair

“Corny Dogs” as sold at the Texas State Fair

Both vegetarian corn dogs and corn dog nuggets are made as meatless alternatives by many of the same companies that produce veggie dogs.
In Argentina they are called panchukers and are sold mostly around train stations, and are more popular in the inner country cities. They are often consumed on the street, and may contain cheese. They are served with a number of sauces.
In Australia, a hot dog sausage on a stick, deep fried in batter, is known as a Dagwood Dog, Pluto Pup, or Dippy Dog, depending on region. Variants exist that use wheat-based or corn-based batters. These are not to be confused with the British and Australian battered sav, a saveloy deep fried in a wheat-flour-based batter, as used for fish and chips, which generally does not contain cornmeal. In New Zealand and South Korea, a similar battered sausage on a stick is called a “hot dog”, whereas a “frankfurter” sausage in a long bun is referred to as an “American hot dog”.

In Japan, something like a corn dog can be found at many supermarkets and convenience stores as “American Dogs” for their American origin. These American Dogs, however, use a wheat-flour-based batter with no cornmeal at all.
In Canada, corn dogs may be referred to as “pogo sticks”, or “pogos”, after a popular brand name.
Another version comes with either melted cheese between the hot dog and the breading or the hot dog is replaced with a cheese-filled hot dog.
Yet another version is the “cornbrat” (or “corn brat”), which is a corn dog made with bratwurst instead of a wiener or hot dog. They are also sold in varieties of different hot dogs such as pork and turkey.
Hot dogs can also so be covered in a potato and egg coating, fried and served on a stick like a corn dog. In effect, the cornbread component is replaced with a latke.
Small corn dogs, known as “corn puppies,” “mini corn dogs,” or “corn dog nuggets,” are a variation served in some restaurants, generally on the children’s menu or at fast food establishments. A serving includes multiple pieces, usually 10. In contrast to their larger counterparts, corn puppies are normally served stickless as finger food.

 

 

 

National Corndog Day is a celebration of the corn dog, tater tots, and American beer that occurs on the first Saturday of March of every year.

 

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.

Louisiana Woman Blog

It all started with my Momma's gumbo recipe!

Miranda Intentionally

Mindfully Vegan

Easy Peasy Lemon

Squeezing not necessary

Orangelolls

Cook, Tan, Eat, Repeat.

Peas And Crayons

Veggie-centric recipes and more!

Kenny's Camera, Cooking & Crazy Confessions!

It's photography, recipes and madness. It's laughter, it's lessons, it's life...

Wholesome Joy

Wellness & Health + Whole-Food Recipes + Budget Minded

Hettie's Reflections

On family history, parenting, education, social issues and more

Theheliophile24

A Bong girl's cooking diary

Sunshine and Savory

Sharing My Love of Cooking and Home With Others

Heart Your LifeStyle

Getting back to the basics

Plowing Through Life

A thirty-something mom raising farm kids

Food and Festivities

Where food and fun come together!

the frozen biscuit

family style food, whole ingredients

Guam Christian Blog

Lifting up God’s people