Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 19, 2013 at 9:26 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 2 Comments
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Where do you keep your scouring pads? Believe it or not, you can keep them in a plastic bag in your freezer. That way, you don’t have to worry about them rusting, and they’ll last a lot longer

The Old Family Buckeye Recipe

December 12, 2013 at 8:29 AM | Posted in dessert | Leave a comment
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buckeyes-001 (1)

 

It’s that time of year when the requests start coming in for my Mom’s Buckeyes. Back when I was working I wasn’t one to switch jobs too often. A total of three full time jobs during that time. It’s been 9 years since I lost my leg to melanoma cancer and unable to work but to this day but I still get request’s from fellow past workers for my Mom’s Buckeyes. It seems that everyone that has had them all say the same thing “The best Buckeyes I’ve ever had!” I think it’s the Rice Krispies that sets them apart from other Buckeye Candies. I’m sure you’ll agree, let me know! These are not diabetes friendly but are delicious. We tried making them by using reduced fat Peanut Butter and Sugar Free Chocolate but they just didn’t come out the same.

 

 
Ingredients:

Recipe will make about 60 balls

1 – Stick Butter, Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter
1 – Box (1 LB) Confectioner Sugar
2 – Cups Jiff Smooth Peanut Butter
3 – Cups Rice Krispies
1 – 12 oz. Package Chocolate Chips
1 – Small Bar Hershey’s Milk Chocolate
1/2 Bar Paraffin Wax

 
Directions:

* In a large bowl mix Butter, Sugar, Peanut Butter, and Rice Krispies (With Hands)
* Chill the mixture for at least 2 hours.
* Then take the mixture and roll into individual balls. The size can vary no set size.
* Melt all the Chocolate and Paraffin Wax in a double broiler or in a sauce pan on low heat stirring until smooth.
* With one or two forks dip each of the balls into the Chocolate/Wax. Drain excess off the balls and place on a sheet pan covered with wax paper and refrigerate for several hours until Chocolate has hardened into a shell covering the balls.
* Now enjoy them!

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 7, 2013 at 10:11 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 1 Comment
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To treat rust on metal baking dishes and cookware, sprinkle powdered laundry detergent on the spot, then scour with the cut side of half a raw potato.

What to do With – Ham Leftovers

November 7, 2013 at 12:13 PM | Posted in Ham, leftovers, potatoes | 2 Comments
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It’s the day after one of the upcoming Holidays and you have a lot of Ham leftover. Here’s one idea, and a delicious one, to use that Ham!

 

Ham and Potatoes Casserole

 
INGREDIENTS:
2 cups Potatoes, cubed
2 cups Leftover Cooked Ham, cubed
1 (15.25 ounce) can Whole Kernel Corn,
drained
1/4 cup finely minced fresh Cilantro
1/4 cup Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter
1 tablespoon chopped Onions
1/3 cup All-Purpose Flour
1 3/4 cups 2% Milk
1/8 teaspoon Ground Black Pepper
4 ounces Sargento Reduced Fat Shredded Sharp Cheddar, (or more!)

 

 

DIRECTIONS:
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
2. Bring a large pot of salted, sea Salt, water to a boil. Add potatoes and cook until tender but still firm, about 15 minutes. Drain and cool.
3. Combine potatoes, ham, corn and cilantro; set aside. In a saucepan saute onion in butter for 2 minutes, stir in flour until blended well. Gradually add milk and pepper. Bring to a boil. Cook and stir for 2 minutes. Remove from heat and pour over the ham mixture. Stir to mix well.
4. Pour into greased 11×7 baking dish. Cover and bake for 25 minutes. Uncover, sprinkle with cheese and bake 5 to 10 minutes longer until cheese melts.

Kitchen Hints of the Day!

October 28, 2013 at 11:35 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Hint #1 – If your storage containers smell of garlic, onions, or another potent food, wash them thoroughly, then stuff crumpled newspaper inside before snapping on the lids. In a few days, the smell will be gone.

 

 

 

Hint #2 – Washing a plastic container with a stale smell over and over won’t get rid of the sour odor, but this will. Wipe inside with tomato juice, wash as usual, dry completely and place in freezer (top and bottom separately). In a few days it will be good as new.

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Lasagna

September 4, 2013 at 9:01 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 2 Comments
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I haven’t had Lasagna made with Buffalo Italian Sausage, YET! This just sounds like one of those keeper recipes. Another delicious and healthy recipe from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo. I can’t wait to try this one!

 

 

LasagnaWild Idea Buffalo Lasagna
By: Jill O’Brien

Lasagna (serves 4 to 6)
Ingredients:

1 – Batch Buffalo Meat Sauce
1 – pkg. no boil lasagna sheets
1 – lb. fresh mozzarella, sliced
8oz. – parmesan, grated
* optional roasted zucchini
Buffalo Meat Sauce Ingredients:

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 – pound Buffalo Italian Sausage
1 – onion, diced
1 tablespoon fresh garlic, chopped
1 tablespoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon dried basil
2 teaspoon dried crushed fennel
½ teaspoon fresh rosemary, finely diced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 – cup red wine
1 quart crushed tomatoes, (rinse jar with 1 cup water)
1 tablespoon brown sugar
½ tablespoon balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice

Preparation of Sauce:

* Heat olive oil in heavy sauce pan over medium high heat.
* Coarsely crumble in Buffalo Italian Sausage and stir once.
*Add onion, garlic and dried spices. Stir to incorporate. Continue to cook until sausage is lightly browned, stirring occasionally.
*Add red wine and stir.
*Add remaining ingredients. Let ingredients come to full heat, stirring occasionally.
*Reduce heat to low and simmer uncovered for 30 minutes or until desired thickness is achieved. Stir occasionally.
*Season to taste.
Assembly:

* Lightly oil lasagna pan or casserole dish.
* Cover bottom of pan with one cup meat sauce.
* Layer with lasagna sheets, meat sauce, and mozzarella. (Roasted zucchini may be added to layers if you choose.)
* Repeat layers 2 to 3 times based on pan size, ending with a thin layer of meat sauce on top.
* Cover with foil and bake at 375* for 45 minutes or until bubbly.
* Cover top with grated Parmesan and allow to melt or lightly brown.

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/lasagna/

 

 

 
Wild Idea Buffalo -1 lb. Italian SausageWild Idea Buffalo Italian Sausage
What do you get when you cross a bison and Italian spices? A way to indulge in a fantastic Italian Sausage, with fewer consequences. Tasting straight from the corner meat shop, it creates a healthier form of grilling or Italian dishes, without sacrificing a bit of flavor. One pound package of ground sausage, not in links. 1 lb. Package

Ingredients: Buffalo, Organic Spices:[Black Pepper, Pure Cane Sugar, Crushed Red Pepper, Fennel Seeds, Garlic Powder, Oregano, Paprika] Red Wine Vinegar, Salt, Water.

 

 

http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/products/1-lb-italian-sausage

Cast Iron Skillet Blackened Grouper w/ Hash Browns and Cut Green Beans

August 15, 2013 at 5:41 PM | Posted in fish, greenbeans, hash browns, Pillsbury, Zatarain's | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Cast Iron Skillet Blackened Grouper w/ Hash Browns and Cut Green BeansNut Bread Blackend Grouper 007

 

 

Another cool morning and beautiful day out, about a high of 74 and sunny! Worked on the grill today and was able to get it up and running again. It’s patch work every time we use it but trying to hold out till later in the year when the grills go on sale. Tonight I prepared a Cast Iron Skillet Blackened Grouper w/ Hash Browns and Cut Green Beans.

 

 

I used another piece of the Gulf Coast Grouper that a friend gave me from when they were in Florida earlier this year. I’ve got 2 more big pieces left but he’ll be going back to Florida in another month or so and hopefully he’ll remember his old buddy Mark and bring some more back North with him! To prepare the Grouper, after it thawed, I rinsed the fillet off with water and patted dry with a paper towel. Melted a couple of tablespoons of Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter down and rubbed the fillets down with the butter. Then seasoned it with a bit of Sea Salt and then with Zatarain’s Blackened Seasoning, rubbing the Blackened Seasoning in till both sides of the fillet were covered. Heated up my favorite skillet the Cast Iron Skillet and fried the fillets. Always have your overhead stove fan on when Blackening, it will create the smoke! The pieces were thick so I fried them about 4 minutes per side. After the smoke cleared the Grouper came out perfect! Gulf Coast Grouper by itself is delicious but Blackening it just brings that much more flavor. I’m going to have to try some Blackened Chicken Thighs soon!

 

 

For side dishes I had some Hash Browns. I used Simply Potatoes Hash Browns, best Hash Browns by far. I also warmed a can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and had a slice of Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. For dessert later a slice of fresh baked Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread.

 

Nut Bread Blackend Grouper 001

 

 

 

 

Cast-iron cookwarecast iron frying pan
Cast iron cookware has excellent heat retention properties and can be produced and formed with a relatively low level of technology. Seasoning is used to protect bare cast iron from rust and to create a non-stick surface.
Types of bare cast-iron cookware include panini presses, waffle irons, crepe makers, dutch ovens, frying pans, deep fryers, tetsubin, woks, potjies, karahi, flattop grills and griddles.

 

Cast iron’s ability to withstand and maintain very high cooking temperatures makes it a common choice for searing or frying, and its excellent heat retention makes it a good option for long-cooking stews or braised dishes. Because cast iron skillets can develop a “non-stick” surface, they are also a good choice for egg dishes. Other uses of cast iron pans include baking, for instance for making cornbread, cobblers and cakes.
Most bare cast iron pots and pans are cast from a single piece of metal in order to provide even distribution of heat. This quality allows most bare cast iron pans to serve as dual-purpose stovetop fryers and oven baking dishes. Many recipes call for the use of a cast iron skillet or pot, especially so that the dish can be initially seared or fried on the stovetop then transferred into the oven, pan and all, to finish baking. Likewise, cast iron skillets can double as baking dishes. Cornbread in particular is seen as a food item that is best prepared in a cast iron skillet: the iron pan is heated beforehand in the oven, the ingredients are combined in the heated pan, and the dish is then placed directly into the oven for fast baking. This differs from many other cooking pots, which have varying components that may be damaged by the excessive temperatures of 400 °F (204 °C) or more.
Cast iron is a very slow conductor of heat and forms hot spots if heated too quickly, or on an undersized burner;[3] however, it has excellent heat retention properties, and the entire pan will eventually become extremely hot, including the iron handle or handles.

Wild Idea Recipe of the Week – Bison Chuck Roast for Pulled Buffalo B.B.Q.

August 7, 2013 at 9:21 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | 1 Comment
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Another good one from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo! You can purchase the Bison Chuck Roast that makes this delicious dish on line at http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

Bison Chuck Roast for Pulled Buffalo B.B.Q.Wild Idea Buffalo Pulled Buffalo B.B.Q.
By: Jill O’Brien

Ingredients:

1 3 pound Bison Chuck Roast, twine removed, rinsed & patted dry
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons black pepper
2 cup organic Apple Cider, warmed
1.) Pre-heat oven to 500*.
2.) Mix 1 tablespoon olive oil with salt and pepper, in dutch oven or heavy pan. Place roast in pan and roll around in seasoning, rubbing into meat.
3.) Place roast in hot oven uncovered and roast for 15 minutes.
4.) Add warmed Apple Cider, cover pot tightly and lower temperature to 350*.
5.) Braise Buffalo Roast for 2 ½ hours turning once during braising time.
6.) Roast is finished cooking when meat is tender. You should be able to pull the meat apart using 2 forks, (continue braising for another ½ hour if this is not achieved).
7.) Remove form heat and let roast rest at room temperature, covered for 1 hour, or until you are able to handle.
8.) Remove roast from pot and place on cutting board. Reserve pan juices. Using two forks or hands pull meat apart into manageable pieces and then pull apart into smaller pieces or shred.
9.) Return meat to 1 cup of pan juices.
10.) Add 1 cup B.B.Q. sauce and stir to incorporate. Bring to full heat, adding in more pan juices or B.B.Q. sauce as desired. Reduce heat to simmer.

Serve as entrée or on buns for sandwiches. Accompany with Firecracker Coleslaw.

 

 

Jill’s B.B. Q. Sauce

 

Ingredients:

1 Tb. Olive Oil
1 cup onion, finely diced
2 T. Garlic, chopped
1 T. Black Pepper
1 tsp. Cayenne
1 tsp. Chili Powder
1 tsp. Cumin
1 tsp. Coriander
1 tsp. Cinnamon
½ cup Bourbon
2.4 lbs. Ketchup
1 T. Dijon Mustard
1 T. Worcestershire
Dash of Liquid Smoke
½ cup organic Apple cider or water
1.) In heavy saucepan, over medium high heat, heat oil.
2.) Add onion and seasonings and sauté for 7 minutes.
3.) Deglaze with: 1/2 cup Bourbon or Brandy
4.) Add remaining ingredients, and stir until well to incorporate.
5.) Add 1/2 cup juice or water to thin as needed. Bring to a boil.

Pour sauce in sealed container and refrigerate.

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/bison-chuck-roast-for-pulled-buffalo-b-b-q/

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – B.B.Q Buffalo Burgers with Firecracker Coleslaw

June 20, 2013 at 8:40 AM | Posted in bison, grilling, Wild Idea Buffalo | 1 Comment
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It’s B.B.Q Buffalo Burgers with Firecracker Coleslaw for this weeks Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week! BBQ, Grilling, and Buffalo I love it! Just click the link at the bottom of the page to get this and many more recipes and also you can purchase your Buffalo right on-line.

 

 

B.B.Q Buffalo Burgers with Firecracker ColeslawWild Idea Buffalo B.B.Q Buffalo Burgers
By: Jill O’Brien

 

Serves 6 to 8

2 lbs. Wild Idea Ground Buffalo
2 Tb. olive oil
2 tsp. salt
2 tsp. black pepper
Directions

* Mix above ingredients all together, and form into 6 to 8 burgers.

* Set gas grill to high heat. 500+ degrees.

* Place burgers on grill and cook for 2.5 minutes each side, closing grill during cooking.

* Brush with B.B.Q. sauce and grill for an additional 30 seconds each side.

* Place burger on grilled French bread and top with Firecracker coleslaw.
Jill’s BBQ Sauce

* In heavy Sauce pan over medium high heat, mix the following:

1 Tbl. Olive Oil
¼ Cup finely chopped Onion
2 tsp. chopped Garlic
1 tsp. Black Pepper
¼ tsp. Cayenne + to taste
½ tsp. each: Chili Powder, Cumin & Coriander
dash Cinnamon
Deglaze with:

1/4 cup Bourbon (Buffalo Trace)

Add:

1.5 lbs. Ketchup
1 Tbl. Dijon Mustard
1 Tbl. Worcestershire
Dash of Liquid Smoke
Stir until well incorporated. Bring to a boil.

*Left over B.B.Q. Sauce can be refrigerated and used at a later time.

 

Firecracker Coleslaw

Toss together:

1 head Green Cabbage, halved and sliced thin
1 Red Onion, halved and sliced thin
2 grated Carrots
1 cup Pepperoncini de-stemmed and flash processed
Dressing:

½ cup Mayonnaise
¼ cup Rice Vinegar
1 small tube Wasabi
1 Tb. Black Pepper
1 tsp. Salt
* Mix in blender and pour over cabbage, toss to coat and season to taste.

* Best if made the day before.

* Fresh with a clean spicy kick, great alone or served on the BBQ sandwich!

 
http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/b-b-q-buffalo-burgers-with-firecracker-coleslaw/

One of America’s Favorite – Grilling

May 24, 2013 at 9:54 AM | Posted in grilling | 1 Comment
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Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above or below. It is sometimes

Hamburgers being grilled

Hamburgers being grilled

referred to as barbecuing but that word can also mean a different cooking technique.
Grilling usually involves a significant amount of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat quickly. Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid such as a gridiron with a heat source above or below), a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill), or griddle (a flat plate heated from below). Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily via thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States and Canada, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is termed broiling. In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is by thermal radiation.
Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500 °F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).
Studies have shown that cooking beef, pork, poultry, and fish at high temperatures can lead to the formation of heterocyclic amines, benzopyrenes, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are carcinogens. Marination may reduce the formation of these compounds. Grilling is often presented as a healthy alternative to cooking with oil, although the fat and juices lost by grilling can contribute to drier food.

 

In the United States, the use of the word grill refers to cooking food directly over a source of dry heat, typically with the food sitting on a metal grate that leaves “grill marks.” Grilling is usually done outdoors on charcoal grills or gas grills, a recent trend is the concept of infrared grilling[citation needed]. Grilling may also be performed using stove-top “grill pans” which have raised metal ridges for the food to sit on, or using an indoor electric grill.
A skewer or brochette, or a rotisserie may be used to cook small pieces of food. The resulting food product is often called a “kabob” or “kebab” which means “to grill” in Persian, which is short for “shish kebab” (shish = skewer)(similar to a “satay” in Asian cuisine, or “alambre” in Mexican-Yucatán cuisine). Shish kebabs have a Persian origin, but are now commonplace in American cuisine.
Mesquite or hickory wood chips (damp) may be added on top of the coals to allow a smoldering effect that provides additional flavor to the food. Other hardwoods such as pecan, apple, maple and oak may also be used.

 

Methods
Gridironing

Gridironing is the cooking of meats or other foods using a grill suspended above a heat source. Grilling is often performed outdoors,

Preparation of Barbecue grill

Preparation of Barbecue grill

using charcoal (real wood or preformed briquettes), wood, or propane gas. Food is cooked using direct radiant heat. Some outdoor grills include a cover so they can be used as smokers or for grill-roasting/barbecue. The suspended metal grate is often referred to as a gridiron.
Outdoor grilling on a gridiron may be referred to as “barbecue”, though in US usage, the term barbecue refers to the cooking of meat by indirect heat and smoke. Barbecue has several meanings and may also be used to refer to the grilled food itself, to a distinct type of cooked meat called Southern barbecue, to the grilling device used to cook the food (a barbecue grill), or to the social event of cooking and eating such food (which may also be called a cook-out or braai).

 

Charcoal kettle-grilling
Charcoal kettle-grilling refers to the process of grilling over a charcoal fire in a kettle, to the point that the edges are charred, or charred grill marks are visible. Some restaurants seek to re-create the charcoal-grilled experience via the use of ceramic lava rocks or infrared heat sources, offering meats that are cooked in this manner as “charcoal-cooked” or “charcoal-grilled”.

 

Grill-baking
By using a baking sheet pan placed above the grill surface, as well as a drip pan below the surface, it is possible to combine grilling and roasting to cook meats that are stuffed or coated with breadcrumbs or batter, as well as to bake breads and even casseroles and desserts. When cooking stuffed or coated meats, the foods can be baked first on the sheet pan, and then placed directly on the grilling surface for char marks, effectively cooking twice; the drip pan will be used to capture any crumbs that fall off from the coating or stuffing.

 

Grill-braising [edit]
It is possible to braise meats and vegetables in a pot on top of a grill. A gas or electric grill would be the best choices for what is known as “barbecue-braising” or “grill-braising”, or combining grilling directly on the surface and braising in a pot. To braise on a grill, put a pot on top of the grill, cover it, and let it simmer for a few hours. There are two advantages to barbecue-braising: the first is that this method now allows for browning the meat directly on the grill before the braising, and the second is that it also allows for glazing the meat with sauce and finishing it directly over the fire after the braising, effectively cooking the meat three times, which results in a soft textured product that falls right off the bone. This method of cooking is slower than regular grilling but faster than pit-smoking, starting out fast, slowing down, and then speeding up again to finish; if a pressure cooker is used, the cooking time will be much faster.

 

Indoor grilling
Many restaurants incorporate an indoor grill as part of their cooking apparatus. These grills resemble outdoor grills, in that they are made up of a grid suspended over a heat source. Indoor grills are more likely to use electric or gas-based heating elements, however. Some manufacturers of residential cooking appliances now offer indoor grills for home use, either incorporated into a stovetop or as standalone electric devices.

 

Stove-top pan grilling

Stove-top pan grilling is an indoor cooking process that uses a grill pan – a cooking pan similar to a frying pan but with raised ridges to

A grill pan

A grill pan

emulate the function or look of a gridiron. In pan grilling, heat is applied directly to the food by the raised ridges, and also indirectly by heat radiating off the lower pan surface via the stove-top flame. Stove-top grill pans can also be used to put sear marks on meat before it is finished via overhead radiant heat. When cooking leaner meats, oil is often applied to the pan ridges to aid in food release.
Some griddles designed for stove-top use also incorporate raised ridges in addition to a flat cooking area. These are either on half of the cooking surface, or, in the case of reversible two-sided griddles, on one side with the flat surface on the other.

 

 

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