Avocado Summer Soup

June 30, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management, Soups | Leave a comment
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I’m passing along another Diabetic Friendly Recipe, Avocado Summer Soup. Beat the heat with Chilled Soup! It’s made using Onion, Clove, Canola Oil, Haas Avocados, Lime Juice, Sherry, Low Sodium Chicken Stock, Hot Pepper Sauce, Cilantro, Low Fat Milk, and Kosher Salt. The recipe is from the Diabetes Self Management website where you can find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and more! You can also subscribe to the Diabetes Self Management Magazine. Each issue is packed with Diabetes News and Diabetic Friendly Recipes. I’ve left a link to subscribe at the end of the post. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Avocado Summer Soup
Get a hearty dose of healthful monounsaturated fats in this fragrant and beautifully colored low-carb avocado soup. Chilled and refreshing, it’s perfect for eating al fresco on a hot summer night!

Ingredients
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 garlic clove, minced
1 tablespoon canola oil
2 large ripe Haas avocados
1/4 cup lime juice
2 tablespoon sherry
1 (14-ounce) can low-sodium chicken stock (or 1 1/2 cups homemade chicken broth)
1/2 teaspoon hot pepper sauce
2 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro
2 cups low-fat milk
Dash kosher salt

Directions
Yield: 8 servings
Serving size: 1/8 of recipe

1 – Sauté the onion and garlic in the oil until soft and fragrant. Set aside.

2 – Peel and chop the avocado. Purée in a blender or food processor with the onion and garlic mixture, the lime juice, and the sherry.

3 – Add chicken broth and hot sauce. Process until blended. Pour into a large serving bowl and add the chopped cilantro and milk. (Use more or less to achieve desired consistency.)

4 – Add salt to taste and chill for 2 to 3 hours before serving.

5 – Garnish with more chopped cilantro.

Nutrition Information:
Calories: 125 calories, Carbohydrates: 9 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 9 g, Saturated Fat: 1.5 g, Cholesterol: 5 mg, Sodium: 50 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/snack/avocado-summer-soup/

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Fall Harvest: Garlic

October 4, 2013 at 8:59 AM | Posted in spices and herbs, vegetables | 1 Comment
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Garlic is another produce item that we forget has a season; fresh garlic is at its plump, sweetest best in late summer and fall.

 

Bulbils

Bulbils

Allium sativum, commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion genus, Allium. Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek, chive, and rakkyo. With a history of human use of over 7,000 years, garlic is native to central Asia, and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe. It was known to Ancient Egyptians, and has been used for both culinary and medicinal purposes.

 

 

Allium sativum is a bulbous plant. It grows up to 1.2 m (4 ft) in height. Its hardiness is USDA Zone 8. It produces hermaphrodite flowers. Pollination occurs by bees and other insects.

 

 

Garlic is widely used around the world for its pungent flavor as a seasoning or condiment.
The garlic plant’s bulb is the most commonly used part of the plant. With the exception of the single clove types, garlic bulbs are normally divided into numerous fleshy sections called cloves. Garlic cloves are used for consumption (raw or cooked) or for medicinal purposes. They have a characteristic pungent, spicy flavor that mellows and sweetens considerably with cooking.
Other parts of the garlic plant are also edible. The leaves and flowers (bulbils) on the head (spathe) are sometimes eaten. They are milder in flavor than the bulbs, and are most often consumed while immature and still tender. Immature garlic is sometimes pulled, rather like a scallion, and sold as “green garlic”. When green garlic is allowed to grow past the “scallion” stage, but not permitted to fully mature, it may produce a garlic “round”, a bulb like a boiling onion, but not separated into cloves like a mature bulb. Additionally, the immature flower stalks (scapes) of the hardneck and elephant types are sometimes marketed for uses similar to asparagus in stir-fries.
Inedible or rarely eaten parts of the garlic plant include the “skin” and root cluster. The papery, protective layers of “skin” over various parts of the plant are generally discarded during preparation for most culinary uses, though in Korea immature whole heads are sometimes prepared with the tender skins intact. The root cluster attached to the basal plate of the bulb is the only part not typically considered palatable in any form.

String of garlic

String of garlic

Garlic is a fundamental component in many or most dishes of various regions, including eastern Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, northern Africa, southern Europe, and parts of South and Central America. The flavor varies in intensity and aroma with the different cooking methods. It is often paired with onion, tomato, or ginger. The parchment-like skin is much like the skin of an onion, and is typically removed before using in raw or cooked form. An alternative is to cut the top off the bulb, coat the cloves by dribbling olive oil (or other oil-based seasoning) over them, and roast them in an oven. Garlic softens and can be extracted from the cloves by squeezing the (root) end of the bulb, or individually by squeezing one end of the clove. In Korea, heads of garlic are fermented at high temperature; the resulting product, called black garlic, is sweet and syrupy, and is now being sold in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia.
Garlic may be applied to different kinds of bread to create a variety of classic dishes, such as garlic bread, garlic toast, bruschetta, crostini and canapé.

 

Garlic being crushed using a garlic press

Garlic being crushed using a garlic press

Oils can be flavored with garlic cloves. These infused oils are used to season all categories of vegetables, meats, breads and pasta.
In some cuisines, the young bulbs are pickled for three to six weeks in a mixture of sugar, salt, and spices. In eastern Europe, the shoots are pickled and eaten as an appetizer.
Lightly smoked garlic is becoming increasingly popular in British and European cuisine. It is particularly prized for stuffing poultry and game, and in soups and stews. In both these cases it is important to utilize the undiscarded skin, as much of the smoke flavor is situated there, rather than in the cloves themselves.
Immature scapes are tender and edible. They are also known as “garlic spears”, “stems”, or “tops”. Scapes generally have a milder taste than the cloves. They are often used in stir frying or braised like asparagus. Garlic leaves are a popular vegetable in many parts of Asia. The leaves are cut, cleaned, and then stir-fried with eggs, meat, or vegetables.
Mixing garlic with egg yolks and olive oil produces aioli. Garlic, oil, and a chunky base produce skordalia. Blending garlic, almond, oil, and soaked bread produces ajoblanco.
Garlic powder has a different taste from fresh garlic. If used as a substitute for fresh garlic, 1/8 teaspoon of garlic powder is equivalent to one clove of garlic.

 

 

 

2 Bean Salad

August 2, 2013 at 11:16 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, salad | 1 Comment
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Low calorie, low carb, fresh, and delicious. Enjoy!

 

 

 

2 Bean Salad

Ingredients:

1 cup finely chopped Red Onion
2 tablespoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1/3 cup Red Wine Vinegar
1/4 cup chopped Red Pepper
2 tablespoons minced Parsley
2 Cloves Garlic, minced
2 tablespoons Equal® Spoonful™
1/4 teaspoon Sea Salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly Ground Pepper
1 (15-ounce) can Great Northern beans, rinsed, drained
1 (15-ounce) can Low Sodium Black Beans, rinsed, drained
Red Pepper Rings
Directions:

Sauté onions in oil until crisp-tender in medium skillet; remove from heat and cool until warm.
Stir vinegar, red pepper, parsley, garlic, Equal® Spoonful™ , salt and pepper into onions.
Pour onion mixture over combined beans in bowl; mix well. Garnish with pepper rings.
Makes 8 servings.

Garlic: How to buy, store and use it

June 6, 2013 at 1:18 PM | Posted in cooking | 7 Comments
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I read this article yesterday in our local newspaper about one of my favorite ingredients, Garlic, and just thought I would pass it along.

 

Garlic: How to buy, store and use it
We have advice from a local expert.
Folklore says it can bring good luck, protect against evil and ward off vampires; but for most of us, we use garlic to give an aromatic, flavorful kick to an otherwise mundane meal. A member of the onion family and affectionately referred to as “the stinking rose,” garlic is truly a powerhouse of pungency and nutritional benefits, as well.
We asked Cooks’Wares, Inc. (located in Cincinnati and Springboro) culinary school director, Joe Westfall, to provide his tips on all things garlic:

Selecting garlic

Though garlic can be bought in minced, powered or paste form, the way to max out the flavor and nutritional benefits is to buy it fresh. Fresh garlic is arranged in a head, called a “bulb” and consists of numerous, separate cloves. The entire bulb and individual cloves are encased in a paper-like sheath that can be bluish, white or off-white in color. Fresh garlic should feel firm and dry when squeezed between your fingers.

Storing garlic

Fresh garlic can be bought in bulk, and if stored properly, an intact bulb can last for about a month. It is not necessary to refrigerate fresh garlic, but it should be stored either uncovered or loosely covered in a cool, dark place, like a cabinet. Freezing fresh garlic is an option but can greatly reduce the flavor. Also, as garlic ages, a tiny green germination — which is actually the sprout of a new plant — can appear at the center of the clove. It should be removed before preparing, as it has a bitter taste and will affect the overall flavor.

Preparing garlic

For peeling garlic, most chefs use a tried and true method of laying the garlic clove flat on the cutting board, taking their chef’s knife and placing it flat on top of the clove, and giving the flat side of the knife a quick whack with their hand. The clove smashes a bit and the papery covering comes right off the clove.

As far as chopping and mincing [finely chopped] are concerned, there are more tools coming out every year to make that process easier and easier. The old standby mincer, which has been around forever, does quick work of taking large cloves and turning them into minced garlic.

Then there is the chef’s method: peeling the garlic as mentioned above, placing it on the cutting board and using a chef’s knife, mincing the garlic into a fine or coarse mince; crude and simple perhaps, but thorough.

Finally, there is David Cook, chef/owner of Daveed’s NEXT restaurant in Loveland, Ohio. He demonstrated this once in a class: You take the peeled garlic and place it into some plastic wrap. Fold it over a few times to seal it in. Take the backside of the chef’s knife and rapidly chop at the garlic, quickly turning it into a fine or coarse mince. Then simply peel back the plastic wrap and your garlic is right there for your use — no fuss, no muss. And, your hands stay clean.

Regarding garlic paste, most chefs will use a little coarse kosher salt and sprinkle it onto some minced garlic and with the flat side of their chef’s knife, will mash the garlic and salt together to form a garlic paste.

 
http://www.mydaytondailynews.com/news/lifestyles/garlic-how-to-buy-store-and-use-it/nX9k3/?icmp=daytondaily_internallink_textlink_apr2013_daytondailystubtomydaytondaily_launch

One of America’s Favorites – Garlic

March 25, 2013 at 9:34 AM | Posted in cooking, spices and herbs | 1 Comment
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Allium sativum, commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion genus, Allium. Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek,

A basket of garlic bulbs

A basket of garlic bulbs

chive, and rakkyo. With a history of human use of over 7,000 years, garlic is native to central Asia, and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe. It was known to Ancient Egyptians, and has been used for both culinary and medicinal purposes.

According to Zohary and Hopf, “A difficulty in the identification of its wild progenitor is the sterility of the cultivars”, though it is thought to be descended from the species Allium longicuspis, which grows wild in central and southwestern Asia. Allium sativum grows in the wild in areas where it has become naturalized. The “wild garlic”, “crow garlic”, and “field garlic” of Britain are members of the species Allium ursinum, Allium vineale, and Allium oleraceum, respectively. In North America, Allium vineale (known as “wild garlic” or “crow garlic”) and Allium canadense, known as “meadow garlic” or “wild garlic” and “wild onion”, are common weeds in fields. One of the best-known “garlics”, the so-called elephant garlic, is actually a wild leek (Allium ampeloprasum), and not a true garlic. Single clove garlic (also called pearl or solo garlic) originated in the Yunnan province of China.

There are a number of garlics with Protected Geographical Status in Europe; these include:
Aglio Rosso di Nubia (Red Garlic of Nubia) from Nubia-Paceco, Provincia di Trapani, Sicily, Italy
*Aglio Bianco Polesano from Veneto, Italy (PDO)
*Aglio di Voghiera from Ferrara, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (PDO)
*Ail blanc de Lomagne from Lomagne in the Gascony area of France (PGI)
*Ail de la Drôme from Drôme in France (PGI)
*Ail rose de Lautrec a rose/pink garlic from Lautrec in France (PGI)
*Ajo Morado de las Pedroñeras a rose/pink garlic from Las Pedroñeras in Spain (PGI)

Within the species, Allium sativum, there are also two main subspecies or varieties.
*Allium sativum var. ophioscorodon Döll, called Ophioscorodon, or hard necked garlic, includes porcelain garlics, rocambole garlic, and purple stripe garlics. It is sometimes considered to be a separate species, Allium ophioscorodon G.Don.
*Allium sativum var. sativum, or soft-necked garlic, includes artichoke garlic, silverskin garlic, and creole garlic.
Bulb garlic is available in many forms, including fresh, frozen, dried, fermented (black garlic) and shelf stable products (in tubes or jars). In addition, see Culinary uses for other edible parts of the garlic plant.

Garlic is easy to grow and can be grown year-round in mild climates. While sexual propagation of garlic is indeed possible, nearly all of

Garlic being crushed using a garlic press


Garlic being crushed using a garlic press

the garlic in cultivation is propagated asexually, by planting individual cloves in the ground. In cold climates, cloves are planted in the fall, about six weeks before the soil freezes, and harvested in late spring. The cloves must be planted at minimum 4 inches underground to prevent freeze/thaw which causes mold or white rot Garlic plants are usually very hardy, and are not attacked by many pests or diseases. Garlic plants are said to repel rabbits and moles. Two of the major pathogens that attack garlic are nematodes and white rot disease, which remain in the soil indefinitely after the ground has become infected. Garlic also can suffer from pink root, a typically nonfatal disease that stunts the roots and turns them pink or red.
Garlic plants can be grown closely together, leaving enough space for the bulbs to mature, and are easily grown in containers of sufficient depth. Garlic does well in loose, dry, well drained soils in sunny locations, and is hardy throughout USDA climate zones 4 – 9. When selecting garlic for planting, it is important to pick large heads from which to separate cloves. Large cloves, along with proper spacing in the planting bed, will also improve head size. Garlic plants prefer to grow in a soil with a high organic material content, but are capable of growing in a wide range of soil conditions and pH levels.
There are different types or subspecies of garlic, most notably hardneck garlic and softneck garlic. The latitude where the garlic is grown affects the choice of type as garlic can be day-length sensitive. Hardneck garlic is generally grown in cooler climates; softneck garlic is generally grown closer to the equator.
Garlic scapes are removed to focus all the garlic’s energy into bulb growth. The scapes can be eaten raw or cooked.

Garlic is grown globally, but China is by far the largest producer of garlic, with approximately 10.5 million tonnes (23 billion pounds) grown annually, accounting for over 77% of world output. India (4.1%) and South Korea (2%) follow, with Egypt and Russia (1.6%) tied in fourth place and the United States (where garlic is grown in every state except for Alaska) in sixth place (1.4%). This leaves 16% of global garlic production in countries that each produce less than 2% of global output. Much of the garlic production in the United States is centered in Gilroy, California, which calls itself the “garlic capital of the world”.

Garlic is widely used around the world for its pungent flavor as a seasoning or condiment.
The garlic plant’s bulb is the most commonly used part of the plant. With the exception of the single clove types, garlic bulbs are normally divided into numerous fleshy sections called cloves. Garlic cloves are used for consumption (raw or cooked) or for medicinal purposes. They have a characteristic pungent, spicy flavor that mellows and sweetens considerably with cooking.
Other parts of the garlic plant are also edible. The leaves and flowers (bulbils) on the head (spathe) are sometimes eaten. They are milder in flavor than the bulbs, and are most often consumed while immature and still tender. Immature garlic is sometimes pulled, rather like a scallion, and sold as “green garlic”. When green garlic is allowed to grow past the “scallion” stage, but not permitted to fully mature, it may produce a garlic “round”, a bulb like a boiling onion, but not separated into cloves like a mature bulb. Additionally, the immature flower stalks (scapes) of the hardneck and elephant types are sometimes marketed for uses similar to asparagus in stir-fries.
Inedible or rarely eaten parts of the garlic plant include the “skin” and root cluster. The papery, protective layers of “skin” over various parts of the plant are generally discarded during preparation for most culinary uses, though in Korea immature whole heads are sometimes prepared with the tender skins intact. The root cluster attached to the basal plate of the bulb is the only part not typically considered palatable in any form.
Garlic is a fundamental component in many or most dishes of various regions, including eastern Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, northern Africa, southern Europe, and parts of South and Central America. The flavor varies in intensity and aroma with the different cooking methods. It is often paired with onion, tomato, or ginger. The parchment-like skin is much like the skin of an onion, and is typically removed before using in raw or cooked form. An alternative is to cut the top off the bulb, coat the cloves by dribbling olive oil (or other oil-based seasoning) over them, and roast them in an oven. Garlic softens and can be extracted from the cloves by squeezing the (root) end of the bulb, or individually by squeezing one end of the clove. In Korea, heads of garlic are fermented at high temperature; the resulting product, called black garlic, is sweet and syrupy, and is now being sold in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia.

Garlic may be applied to different kinds of bread to create a variety of classic dishes, such as garlic bread, garlic toast, bruschetta, crostini and canapé.
Oils can be flavored with garlic cloves. These infused oils are used to season all categories of vegetables, meats, breads and pasta.
In some cuisines, the young bulbs are pickled for three to six weeks in a mixture of sugar, salt, and spices. In eastern Europe, the shoots are pickled and eaten as an appetizer.
Immature scapes are tender and edible. They are also known as “garlic spears”, “stems”, or “tops”. Scapes generally have a milder taste than the cloves. They are often used in stir frying or braised like asparagus.[16] Garlic leaves are a popular vegetable in many parts of Asia. The leaves are cut, cleaned, and then stir-fried with eggs, meat, or vegetables.
Mixing garlic with egg yolks and olive oil produces aioli. Garlic, oil, and a chunky base produce skordalia. Blending garlic, almond, oil, and soaked bread produces ajoblanco.
Garlic powder has a different taste from fresh garlic. If used as a substitute for fresh garlic, 1/8 teaspoon of garlic powder is equivalent to one clove of garlic.

Domestically, garlic is stored warm [above 18 °C (64 °F)] and dry to keep it dormant (so it does not sprout). It is traditionally hung; softneck varieties are often braided in strands called plaits or grappes. Peeled cloves may be stored in wine or vinegar in the refrigerator. Commercially, garlic is stored at 0 °C (32 °F), in a dry, low-humidity environment. Garlic will keep longer if the tops remain attached.
Garlic is often kept in oil to produce flavored oil; however, the practice requires measures to be taken to prevent the garlic from spoiling. Untreated garlic kept in oil can support the growth of Clostridium botulinum which causes the deadly botulism illness; refrigeration will not assure the safety of garlic kept in oil. To reduce this risk, the oil should be refrigerated and used within one week. Commercially prepared oils are widely available. Manufacturers add acids and/or other chemicals to eliminate the risk of botulism in their products. Two outbreaks of botulism related to garlic stored in oil have been reported.
In 1961, Chester Lilley from Kent in England was the first person to transform garlic into a pill form for storage. Although not widely accepted at the time for culinary uses, a capsulate solution for both the storage and simple dosing of garlic has become commonplace.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

January 12, 2013 at 10:51 AM | Posted in cooking, spices and herbs | Leave a comment
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Here’s a great tip when cooking with whole garlic cloves that you plan to remove before the dish is served: Stick a toothpick firmly in the garlic so it will be easy to take out. Put herbs that fall apart during cooking in a tea infuser to make them easy to remove.

Sweet and Sour Short Ribs – Diabetic Friendly

September 22, 2012 at 11:47 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, ribs | Leave a comment
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Thank you Amy and Jeff for passing this one along to share! I’ve never tried this one but they say it’s the only Short Ribs they prepare. Plus another good recipe for those with Diabetes.
DIABETIC SWEET & SOUR SHORT RIBS
INGREDIENTS
– 6 lb Beef Short Ribs
– 1/2 tsp Sea Salt
– 1/2 tsp freshly Cracked Black Peppercorn
– 1 tsp Roasted Ground Cumin
– 1 Clove Garlic, minced
– 3  Tbsp Splenda Brown Sugar Blend
– 2 1/2 Tbsp Corn Starch
– 1 tsp Ground Ginger
– 1 3/4 c Water
– 1/3 c Low Sodium Soy Sauce
 – 1 teaspoon Beef base
– 1/2 c Rice Wine Vinegar
– 2 c Crushed Pineapple
DIRECTIONS
1.   Preheat oven to 400
2.   Spray a baking dish with Pam, place ribs in pan, sprinkle with seasonings
3.   Bake at 400 for 30 minutes, pour off excess fat. Reduce heat to 350 bake 20 minutes longer, pour off excess fat.
4.   In a saucepan dissolve splenda cornstarch and ginger in water
5.   Add soy sauce,  beef base, and vinegar. Cook until sauce thickens, stirring frequently
6.   Stir in pineapple and bring to a boil. After sauce come to a boil remove from heat
7.   Pour sauce over ribs
8.   Bake at 350 for 90 minutes basting occasionally
9.   Skim off excess fat before serving

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