One of America’s Favorites – Cioppino

January 4, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Cioppino

Cioppino, Italian: from Ligurian: cioppin is a fish stew originating in San Francisco, California. It is an Italian-American dish and is related to various regional fish soups and stews of Italian cuisine.

Cioppino is traditionally made from the catch of the day, which in San Francisco is typically a combination of Dungeness crab, clams, shrimp, scallops, squid, mussels and fish, all sourced from salt-water ocean, in this case the Pacific. The seafood is then combined with fresh tomatoes in a wine sauce.

The dish can be served with toasted bread, either local sourdough or French bread. The bread acts as a starch, similar to a pasta, and is dipped into the sauce.

Cioppino was developed in the late 1800s by Italian immigrants who fished off Meiggs Wharf and lived in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco, many from the port city of Genoa. When a fisherman came back empty handed, they would walk around with a pot to the other fishermen asking them to chip in whatever they could. What ever ended up in the pot became their Cioppino. The fishermen that chipped in expected the same treatment if they came back empty handed in the future. It later became a staple as Italian restaurants proliferated in San Francisco.

The name comes from cioppin (also spelled ciopin) which is the name of a classic soup from the Italian region Liguria, similar in flavor to cioppino but with less tomato and using Mediterranean seafood cooked to the point that it falls apart.

The dish also shares its origin with other regional Italian variations of seafood stew similar to cioppin, including cacciucco from Tuscany, brodetto di pesce from Abruzzo and others. Similar dishes can be found in coastal regions throughout the Mediterranean, from Portugal to Greece. Examples of these include suquet de peix from Catalan-speaking regions and bouillabaisse from Provence.

Cioppino with bread

The earliest printed description of cioppino is from a 1901 recipe in The San Francisco Call, though the stew is called “chespini”. “Cioppino” first appears in 1906 in The Refugee’s Cookbook, a fundraising effort to benefit San Franciscans displaced by the 1906 earthquake and fire.

Generally the seafood is cooked in broth and served in the shell, including the crab, which is often served halved or quartered. It therefore requires special utensils, typically a crab fork and cracker. Depending on the restaurant, it may be accompanied by a bib to prevent food stains on clothing, a damp napkin and a second bowl for the shells. A variation, commonly called “lazy man’s cioppino”, is served with shells pre-cracked or removed.

Healthy Oyster Recipes

July 29, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Oyster Recipes. Delicious Healthy Oyster Recipes like; Oyster Stew, Oysters Rockefeller, and Cioppino. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

Healthy Oyster Recipes
Find healthy, delicious oyster recipes including oyster stew and oysters rockefeller. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Oyster Stew
This oyster stew can be transformed from a comforting one-pot meal to an elegant dish for guests when you top it with Caviar Toasts: Dollop toasted slices of baguette with 1 teaspoon sour cream, ½ teaspoon caviar and a sprinkle of herbs. Place each toast atop a steaming bowl of stew. Serve with a salad of butter lettuce, orange segments and red onion tossed with vinaigrette………………..

Oysters Rockefeller
Invented at Antoine’s in New Orleans in 1889, oysters Rockefeller was named for John D. Rockefeller, one of the richest Americans at the time, for its rich sauce. Antoine’s has kept the original recipe secret, but basically it includes a cream sauce with spinach and other greens, flavored with Pernod or anisette. This version omits the cream sauce but is still full of flavor………….

Cioppino
Cioppino is a fish stew traditionally made by Italian fishermen who settled in the North Beach/Fisherman’s Wharf section of San Francisco. It was originally made on fishing boats with whatever fish were at hand. This cioppino comes to us from California chef and cooking teacher John Ash, who has been an advocate for sustainable-food issues for years and has served on the board of advisors of Seafood Watch—the advocacy arm of the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Ash chose a variety of shellfish for this recipe, all of which are Seafood Watch Best Choices or Good Alternatives…………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Oyster Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19179/ingredients/fish-seafood/shellfish/oysters/

Low-Calorie Mussel Recipes

July 14, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Low-Calorie Mussel Recipes.Delicious and Healthy Low-Calorie Mussel Recipes like; Puglian-Style Paella, Cioppino, and Quick Paella with Shrimp and Mussels. Find these recipes and many more all at the EatingWell website. While there you also subscribe to the EatingWell Mgazine, one of my favorites. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Low-Calorie Mussel Recipes
Find healthy, delicious low-calorie mussel recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Puglian-Style Paella
In this Italian paella recipe, potatoes and other vegetables are layered with mussels and rice and baked in a casserole dish. Be sure to cover the rice completely with vegetables to ensure it cooks properly……

Cioppino
Cioppino is a fish stew traditionally made by Italian fishermen who settled in the North Beach/Fisherman’s Wharf section of San Francisco. It was originally made on fishing boats with whatever fish were at hand. This cioppino comes to us from California chef and cooking teacher John Ash, who has been an advocate for sustainable-food issues for years and has served on the board of advisors of Seafood Watch—the advocacy arm of the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Ash chose a variety of shellfish for this recipe, all of which are Seafood Watch Best Choices or Good Alternatives………….

Quick Paella with Shrimp and Mussels
Our quick take on paella is studded with mussels and shrimp. Traditional paella made with short-grain rice takes a while to cook and can be a bit tricky. Instant brown rice is a great shortcut—what it lacks in authenticity it more than makes up for in convenience. Make sure you seek out saffron, which gives the dish its distinctive yellow color and signature flavor. Serve with: Spinach salad…………

* Click the link below to get all the Low-Calorie Mussel Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/search/results/?wt=Low-Calorie%20Mussel%20Recipes&sort=re

One of America’s Favorites – Cioppino

June 26, 2017 at 5:43 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cioppino

Cioppino is a fish stew originating in San Francisco, California. It is considered an Italian-American dish, and is related to various regional fish soups and stews of Italian cuisine.

 

 

 

 

 

Cioppino with bread

Cioppino is traditionally made from the catch of the day, which in San Francisco is typically a combinati on of Dungeness crab, clams, shrimp, scallops, squid, mussels, and fish all sourced from salt-water ocean; in this case the Pacific. The seafood is then combined with fresh tomatoes in a wine sauce.

The dish can be served with toasted bread, either local sourdough or French bread. In the dish, the bread is as a starch, similar to a pasta. It is freely dipped into the ample quantity of sauce. The bread then absorbs, holds, and modulates the flavorful yet slender (watery) sauce; that is to be freely “sopped up” by the heavy, full bodied breads. The bread’s consumption, after dipping into the sauce, prolongs the flavors on the palate when eating the dish.

 

 

 

Cioppino was developed in the late 1800s primarily by Italian immigrants who settled in the North Beach neighborhood of San Francisco, many from the port city of Genoa. When a fisherman came back empty handed, they would walk around with a pot to the other fishermen asking them to chip in whatever they could. What ever ended up in the pot became their Cioppino. The fishermen that chipped in expected the same treatment if they came back empty handed in the future. It later became a staple as Italian restaurants proliferated in San Francisco.

The name comes from ciuppin which is the name of a classic soup from the Italian region Liguria, similar in flavor to cioppino but with less tomato and using Mediterranean seafood cooked to the point that it falls apart.

The dish also shares its origin with other regional Italian variations of seafood stew similar to ciuppin, including cacciucco from Tuscany, brodetto di pesce from Abruzzo, and others. Similar dishes can be found in coastal regions throughout the Mediterranean, from Portugal to Greece. Examples of these include suquet de peix from Catalan-speaking regions and bouillabaisse from Provence.

 

Cioppino classique

Generally the seafood is cooked in broth and served in the shell, including the crab, which is often served halved or quartered. It therefore requires special utensils, typically a crab fork and cracker. Depending on the restaurant, it may be accompanied by a bib to prevent food stains on clothing, a damp napkin, and a second bowl for the shells. A variation, commonly called “lazy man’s cioppino,” is served with shells pre-cracked or removed.

 

 

Lean-O Cioppino

January 27, 2012 at 7:08 PM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Food, low calorie, low carb, seafood, shrimp | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Lean-O Cioppino w/ Sourdough Bread

When I seen this being made on Hungry Girl the other day it looked and sounded too good not to try! I went earlier today to stock up on the inredients and also picked up a loaf of freshly Sour Dough Bread, from the Kroger Bakery. It looked delicious but I had never heard of Cioppino so I looked it up and here’s what I found:

Cioppino is a fish stew originating in San Francisco. It is considered an Italian-American dish, and is related to various regional fish soups and stews of Italian cuisine. Cioppino is traditionally made from the catch of the day, which in the dish’s place of origin is typically a combination of dungeness crab, clams, shrimp, scallops, squid, mussels and fish. The seafood is then combined with fresh tomatoes in a wine sauce, and served with toasted bread, either sourdough or baguette. The dish is comparable to cacciucco and brodetto from Italy, as well as other fish dishes from the Mediterranean region such as bouillabaisse, burrida, and bourride of the French Provence, suquet de peix from Catalan speaking regions of coastal Spain.

This recipe from Hungrey Girl called for Clams and Shrimp. The recipe also called for Amy’s Organic Light In Sodium Chunky Tomato Bisque but they were out of stock of that so I went with a can of  Amy’s Organic Light In Sodium Cream of Tomato and when preparing it I added a half a can of Tomato Paste to it to thicken it up a bit. It’s very easy to make and every bit as delicious as it sounded! What a great combination to make a healthy and hearty Soup and it’s only 185 calories and 20 carbs. I topped it with some crumbled John Wm Macy’s Cheese Sticks and I had a side of Sour Dough Loaf Bread. This is a fantastic recipe, give it a try! I left the recipe along with the link to “Hungrey Girl” at the end of the post. For dessert later a 100 Calorie Breyer’s Ice Cream Bar.

Lean-O Cioppino

2011 Hungry Girl

Ingredients

Two 15-oz. cans reduced-sodium creamy tomato soup with 4g fat or less per serving (like the Light in Sodium version of Amy’s Chunky Tomato Bisque)

One 10-oz. can whole baby clams, drained
6 oz. (about 30) cooked ready-to-eat medium-small shrimp
1/4 tsp. dried oregano
2 tbsp. chopped fresh basil
Salt and black pepper, to taste
Optional garnish: fresh basil leaves

Directions

Place a nonstick pot on the stove, and set temperature to medium heat. Pour in the soup.

Add clams, shrimp, oregano, and basil. Stirring often, bring to desired heat, about 2 minutes.

If you like, season to taste with salt and pepper and garnish with basil leaves. Enjoy!
MAKES 4 SERVINGS
PER SERVING (1/4th of recipe, 1 generous cup): 185 calories, 3.5g fat, 885mg sodium, 20g carbs, 2g fiber, 13g sugars, 19g protein

http://www.hungry-girl.com/show/under-five-minutes-lean-o-cioppino-recipe

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