One of America’s Favorites – Cincinnati Chili

October 8, 2018 at 5:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A Cincinnati chili 5-way over spaghetti

Cincinnati chili (or Cincinnati-style chili) is a Mediterranean-spiced meat sauce used as a topping for spaghetti (a “two-way”) or hot dogs (“coneys”), both dishes developed by Macedonian immigrant restaurateurs in the 1920s. Ingredients include ground beef, water or stock, tomato paste, spices such as cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, cloves, cumin, chili powder, bay leaf, and in some recipes unsweetened dark chocolate in a soupy consistency. Other toppings include cheese, onions, and beans; specific combinations of toppings are known as “ways.” The name “Cincinnati chili” is often confusing to those unfamiliar with it, who expect the dish to be similar to chili con carne; as a result, it is common for those encountering it for the first time to conclude it is a poor example of chili.

While served in many local restaurants, it is most often associated with the over 250 “chili parlors” (restaurants specializing in Cincinnati chili), found throughout greater Cincinnati with franchise locations throughout Ohio and in Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida. The dish is the area’s best-known regional food.

Cincinnati chili originated with immigrant restaurateurs from the Macedonian region who were trying to expand their customer base by moving beyond narrowly ethnic styles of cuisine. Tom and John Kiradjieff began serving a “stew with traditional Mediterranean spices” as a topping for hot dogs which they called “coneys” in 1922 at their hot dog stand located next to a burlesque theater called the Empress. Tom Kiradjieff used the sauce to modify a traditional Greek dish, speculated to have been pastitsio, moussaka or saltsa kima to come up with a dish he called chili spaghetti. He first developed a recipe calling for the spaghetti to be cooked in the chili but changed his method in response to customer requests and began serving the sauce as a topping, eventually adding grated cheese as a topping for both the chili spaghetti and the coneys, also in response to customer requests. To make ordering more efficient, the brothers created the “way” system of ordering. The style has since been copied and modified by many other restaurant proprietors, often fellow Greek and Macedonian immigrants who had worked at Empress restaurants before leaving to open their own chili parlors, often following the business model to the point of locating their restaurants adjacent to theaters.

Empress was the largest chili parlor chain in Cincinnati until 1949, when a former Empress employee and Greek

Price Hill Chili

immigrant, Nicholas Lambrinides, started Skyline Chili. In 1965, four brothers named Daoud, immigrants from Jordan, bought a restaurant called Hamburger Heaven from a former Empress employee, noticed the Cincinnati chili was outselling the hamburgers on their menu, and changed the restaurant’s name to Gold Star Chili. As of 2015 Skyline (over 130 locations) and Gold Star (89 locations) were the largest Cincinnati chili parlor chains, while Empress had only two remaining locations, down from over a dozen during the chain’s most successful period.

Besides Empress, Skyline, and Gold Star, there are also smaller chains such as Dixie Chili and Deli and numerous independents including the acclaimed Camp Washington Chili, probably the most well-known of the independents.Other independents include Pleasant Ridge Chili, Blue Ash Chili, Park Chili Parlor, Price Hill Chili, Chili Time, and the Blue Jay Restaurant, in all totalling more than 250 chili parlors. In addition to the chili parlors, some version of Cincinnati chili is commonly served at many local restaurants. Arnold’s Bar and Grill, the oldest bar in the city, serves a vegetarian “Cincy Lentils” dish ordered in “ways”. Melt Eclectic Cafe offers a vegan 3-way. For Restaurant Week 2018, a local mixologist developed a cocktail called “Manhattan Skyline,” a Cincinnati chili-flavored whiskey cocktail.

The history of Cincinnati chili shares many factors in common with the apparently independent but simultaneous development of the Coney Island hot dog in other areas of the United States. “Virtually all” were developed by Greek or Macedonian immigrants who passed through Ellis Island as they fled the fallout from the Balkan Wars in the first two decades of the twentieth century.

Raw ground beef is crumbled in water and/or stock, tomato paste and seasonings are added, and the mixture is brought to a boil and then simmered for several hours to form a thin meat sauce. Many recipes call for an overnight chill in the refrigerator to allow for easy skimming of fat and to allow flavors to develop, then reheating to serve. Typical proportions are 2 pounds of ground beef to 4 cups of water and 6 oz tomato paste to make 8 servings.

Ordering Cincinnati chili is based on a specific ingredient series: chili, spaghetti, grated cheddar cheese, diced onions, and kidney beans. The number before the “way” of the chili determines which ingredients are included in each chili order. Customers order a:

Two-way: spaghetti topped with chili (also called “chili spaghetti”)

A Cincinnati chili 4-way garnished with oyster crackers

Three-way: spaghetti, chili, and cheese

Four-way onion: spaghetti, chili, cheese, and onions

Five-way: spaghetti, chili, cheese, onions, and beans

Some restaurants, among them Skyline and Gold Star, do not use the term “four-way bean”, instead using the term “four-way” to denote a three-way plus the customer’s choice of onions or beans. Some restaurants may add extra ingredients to the “way” system; for example, Dixie Chili offers a “six-way”, which adds chopped garlic to a five-way. “Ways” are traditionally served in a shallow oval bowl. Cincinnati chili is also used as a hot dog topping to make a “coney”, a regional variation on the Coney Island chili dog, which is topped with grated cheddar cheese to make a “cheese coney”. The standard coney also includes mustard and chopped onion. The “Three-way” and the “Cheese Coney” are the most popular orders and very few customers order a bowl of plain chili. Most chili parlors do not offer plain chili as a regular menu item.

Oyster crackers are usually served with Cincinnati chili, and a mild hot sauce such as Tabasco is frequently available to be used as an optional topping to be added at the table. Locals eat Cincinnati chili with a fork, cutting each bite as if it were a casserole and never twirling.

Cincinnati chili is the area’s “best known regional food”. According to the Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visitors

Cheese coneys

Bureau, Cincinnatians consume more than 2,000,000 lb (910,000 kg) of Cincinnati chili each year, topped by 850,000 lb (390,000 kg) of shredded cheddar cheese. Overall industry revenues were $250 million in 2014.

Anthony Bourdain called it, “the story of America on your plate.” National food critics Jane and Michael Stern wrote, “As connoisseurs of blue-plate food, we consider Cincinnati chili one of America’s quintessential meals” and “one of this nation’s most distinctive regional plates of food”. Huffington Post named it one of “15 Beloved Regional Dishes”. In 2000, Camp Washington Chili won a James Beard Foundation America’s Classics Award. In 2013, Smithsonian named Cincinnati chili one of “20 Most Iconic Foods in America”, calling out Camp Washington Chili as their destination of choice. John McIntyre, writing in the Baltimore Sun, called it “the most perfect of fast foods”, and, referring to the misnomer, opined that “if the Greeks who invented it nearly a century ago had called it something other than chili, the [chili] essentialists would be able to enjoy it”. In 2015, Thrillist named it “the one food you must eat in Ohio.”

 

The Cincinnati Chili Trail

March 22, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in chili | Leave a comment
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Those of you that live or have visited know how delicious the Chili is here in this area is. Cheese Coneys, Chili Spaghetti, Chili Sandwich, 3-Way, 4-Way, or 5-Way we have them all here. But if you have never had the pleasure of following The Cincinnati Chili Trail, here’s your guide. Enjoy and that Chili! The link to full article is at the bottom of the post.

The Cincinnati Chili Trail

A Cincinnati chili 4-way garnished with oyster crackers

A tour of treasured neighborhood chili joints is a delicious way to get to know the Queen City’s diverse enclaves.

If you’ve lived in Cincinnati for any amount of time, you’ve likely stumbled into the center of a debate between die-hard fans of Skyline and Gold Star: which local chili chain is the best? Both founded by immigrants — Skyline in 1949 by Greek transplant Nicholas Lambrinides and Gold Star in 1965 by the four Jordanian Daoud brothers — they used secret family recipes to create the city’s top feuding chili empires, spreading saucy meat and golden cheese across the Tristate.

But if partisan chili politics isn’t your thing, you can always take the road less traveled and try your tastebuds at a neighborhood parlor, which are just as steeped in tradition and their own unique recipes. Some, like iconic (and James Beard Award-winning) Camp Washington Chili or Food Network-featured Blue Ash Chili are already famous in their own right. Others? Others are more obscure and may not haven’t gotten the Guy Fieri stamp of approval, but are just as vital — and delicious — community institutions.

Starting with the godfather of chili parlors, Empress Chili, and working our way around the city from Northside to Newport, we tried to get a taste for the history and cuisine of several distinct neighborhood spots. We not only discovered the impact that Empress has had as the proverbial trunk of the local family tree of chili joints, but also that noodles slathered in meat sauce taste distinct at each destination.

We couldn’t visit every cherished chili parlor, but here are the fables and flavors behind those we did…….
* Click the link to read the full article
https://www.citybeat.com/food-drink/eats-feature/media-gallery/20995215/the-cincinnati-chili-trail

 

Cincinnati Chili!

February 23, 2017 at 3:48 PM | Posted in cheese, chili | Leave a comment
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A Cincinnati chili 5-way over spaghetti

A Cincinnati chili 5-way over spaghetti

A little background on the Chili I raised on, Cincinnati Chili!

 

Cincinnati chili (or Cincinnati-style chili) is a Mediterranean-spiced meat sauce used as a topping for spaghetti (a”two-way”) or hot dogs (“coneys”), both dishes developed by Greek-Macedonian immigrant restaurateurs in the 1920s. Ingredients include ground beef, stock, tomato paste, cinnamon, other Mediterranean spices and sometimes chocolate in a soup-like consistency. Other toppings include cheese, onions, and beans; specific combinations of toppings are known as “ways”. The name “Cincinnati chili” is often confusing to those unfamiliar with it, who expect the dish to be similar to chili con carne; as a result, it is common for those encountering it for the first time to conclude it is a poor example of chili.

 

 

 

A Cincinnati chili 4-way garnished with oyster crackers

A Cincinnati chili 4-way garnished with oyster crackers

While served in many local restaurants, it is most often associated with the over 250 “chili parlors”, restaurants specializing in Cincinnati chili, found throughout greater Cincinnati with franchise locations throughout Ohio and in Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida. The dish is the area’s best-known regional food.
Ordering Cincinnati chili is based on a specific ingredient series: chili, spaghetti, grated cheddar cheese, diced onions, and kidney beans. The number before the “way” of the chili determines which ingredients are included in each chili order. Customers order a:

Two-way: spaghetti topped with chili (also called “chili spaghetti”)
* Three-way: spaghetti, chili, and cheese
* Four-way: spaghetti, chili, cheese, and onions
* Four-way bean: spaghetti, chili, cheese, and beans (beans substituted for the onions)
* Five-way: spaghetti, chili, cheese, onions, and beans
Some restaurants, among them Skyline and Gold Star, do not use the term “four-way bean”, instead using the term “four-way” to denote a three-way plus the customer’s choice of onions or beans. Some restaurants may add extra

Cheese coneys

Cheese coneys

ingredients to the “way” system; for example, Dixie Chili offers a “six-way”, which adds chopped garlic to a five-way. “Ways” are traditionally served in a shallow oval bowl. Cincinnati chili is also used as a hot dog topping to make a “coney”, a regional variation on the Coney Island chili dog, which is topped with grated cheddar cheese to make a “cheese coney”. The standard coney also includes mustard and chopped onion. The “Three-way” and the “Cheese Coney” are the most popular orders and very few customers order a bowl of plain chili. Most chili parlors do not offer plain chili as a regular menu item. Oyster crackers are usually served with Cincinnati chili, and a mild hot sauce such as Tabasco is frequently used as an optional topping.

 

One of America’s Favorites – Cincinnati Chili

March 31, 2014 at 5:46 AM | Posted in cheese, chili, One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A Cincinnati chili 4-way garnished with oyster crackers

A Cincinnati chili 4-way garnished with oyster crackers

Cincinnati chili (or “Cincinnati-style chili”) is a regional style of chili con carne characterized by the use of seasonings such as cinnamon, cloves, allspice or chocolate. It is commonly served over spaghetti or as a hot dog sauce, and is normally of a thin, sauce-like consistency, unlike most chili con carne. While served in many regular restaurants, it is most often associated with several restaurant chains, such as Empress Chili, Skyline Chili, Gold Star Chili, Camp Washington Chili, Pleasant Ridge Chili, Blue Ash Chili, and Dixie Chili. Restaurant locations are found pervasively in greater Cincinnati with franchise locations also throughout Ohio and in Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida. Restaurants that feature Cincinnati chili are frequently called “chili parlors”.
According to the Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau, Cincinnatians consume more than two million pounds of chili each year, topped by 850,000 pounds of shredded cheddar cheese. Each September, the city celebrates “Chilifest” at Yeatman’s Cove on the Ohio River, with food and entertainment.
Cincinnati chili has earned the praise of national food critics Jane and Michael Stern, who raved “As connoisseurs of blue-plate food, we consider Cincinnati chili one of America’s quintessential meals.”

 

 

 

Ordering Cincinnati chili is based on this ingredient series: chili, spaghetti, grated cheddar cheese, diced onions, and kidney beans. The number before the “way” of the chili determines which ingredients are included in each chili order. Thus, customers can order a:
* Bowl: chili in a bowl
* Two-way: chili and spaghetti
* Three-way: chili, spaghetti, and cheese
* Four-way: chili, spaghetti, cheese, and onions
* Five-way: chili, spaghetti, cheese, onions, and beans
and optionally, the:
* Four-way bean: chili, spaghetti, cheese, and beans (beans substituted for the onions)
The preceding basic menu is entirely traditional. Some chili parlors have altered the traditional menu method, declaring on their menus that a Four-way is chili, spaghetti, cheese, and either onions or beans. Other parlors have added ingredients to the traditional mix. For example, Dixie Chili offers a “Six-way” with the addition of garlic and Blue Ash Chili offers their “Six-way” with the addition of fried jalapeno caps. Oyster crackers are usually served with Cincinnati chili, and a mild hot sauce is frequently used as an optional topping.
When served on a Coney style hot dog, dubbed the “Cheese Coney”, the chili is also topped with grated cheddar cheese. The default coney also includes mustard and a small amount of onion.

 
Cincinnati chili seems to have originated with one or more immigrant restaurateurs from Macedonia who were trying to broaden their customer base by moving beyond narrowly ethnic styles of cuisine. Tom and John Kiradjieff began serving the chili in 1922 at their hot dog stand, next to a burlesque theater called the Empress, after which their Empress chili parlor took its name. Tom Kiradjieff invented the style by modifying a traditional stew and serving it over hot dogs and spaghetti. The style has since been copied and modified by many other restaurant proprietors.
Empress was the main chili parlor in Cincinnati until 1949, when a former Empress employee and Greek immigrant, Nicholas Lambrinides, started another chili restaurant called Skyline Chili.[4] Gold Star Chili came along in 1965, started by the four Daoud brothers who were originally from Jordan.

 

 

 

Cincinnati Style Chili & Cheese Coneys w/ Oyster Crackers and Baked Crinkle Fries

March 5, 2013 at 6:21 PM | Posted in Ball Park Smoked Turkey Franks, cheese, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Ore - Ida | Leave a comment
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Dinner Tonight: Cincinnati Style Chili & Cheese Coneys w/ Oyster Crackers and Baked Crinkle Fries

 

Cheese Coneys Fries 002

 

 
Nasty day out today, dark, gloomy, light rain, and waiting for up to 5 – 6 inches of snow. BLAH! Well to warm it up on the inside I made everybody’s favorite, Cincinnati Style Chili & Cheese Coneys! For dinner I prepared Cincinnati Style Chili & Cheese Coneys w/ Oyster Crackers and Baked Crinkle Fries.

 
To make the Coneys I used Ball Park Smoked White Turkey Franks, Skyline Chili, Kraft 2% Shredded Sharp Cheddar, French’s Yellow Mustard, Frank’s Red Hot Sauce (Optional), Chopped Onions (Optional), and Healthy Life Whole Grain Hot Dog Buns. To assemble a Coney is easy; Bun, Frank, Mustard, Chili, Hot Sauce, and to top it all off Cheese! What is not to like! I served them on Healthy Life Whole Grain Hot Dog Buns with some Oyster Crackers on the side. My parents wanted some fries also so I baked some Ore Ida Crinkle Fries with a side of Hunt’s Ketchup for dipping. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.

 

 

 

 

Ball Park Bun Size Smoked White Turkey Franks
Dial up the lean while you dial in the flavor. Ball Park Turkey Franks are so packed full of classic Ball Park satisfaction, don’t be surprised if he thinks he’s eating an original Ball Park.
BUN SIZE SMOKED WHITE TURKEY FRANKS
Pack your bun with a 100% fat-free frank made with white turkey meat.

 

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 frank (50.0 g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 45
% Daily Value*
Cholesterol 10mg3%
Sodium 420mg18%
Total Carbohydrates 5.0g2%
Sugars 3.0gProtein 6.0g

 

 

http://ballparkbrand.com/#!/products/turkey

A Little History of: Cincinnati Chili

March 5, 2013 at 5:46 PM | Posted in chili, Hot Dogs, Skyline Chili, spaghetti | 2 Comments
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Cincinnati chili (or “Cincinnati-style chili”) is a regional style of chili con carne characterized by the use of seasonings such as

A Cincinnati chili 4-way with oyster crackers

A Cincinnati chili 4-way with oyster crackers

cinnamon, cloves, allspice or chocolate. It is commonly served over spaghetti or as a hot dog sauce, and is normally of a thin, sauce-like consistency, unlike most chili con carne. While served in many regular restaurants, it is most often associated with several restaurant chains, such as Empress Chili, Skyline Chili, Gold Star Chili, Camp Washington Chili and Dixie Chili. Restaurant locations are found pervasively in greater Cincinnati with franchise locations also throughout Ohio and in Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida. Restaurants that feature Cincinnati chili are frequently called “chili parlors”.
According to the Greater Cincinnati Convention and Visitors Bureau, Cincinnatians consume more than two million pounds of chili each year, topped by 850,000 pounds of shredded cheddar cheese. Each September, the city celebrates “Chilifest” at Yeatman’s Cove on the Ohio River, with food and entertainment.

 

Ordering Cincinnati chili is based on this ingredient series: chili, spaghetti, grated cheddar cheese, diced onions, and kidney beans. The number before the “way” of the chili determines which ingredients are included in each chili order. Thus, customers can order a:

 

Bowl: chili in a bowl
Two-way: chili and spaghetti
Three-way: chili, spaghetti, and cheese
Four-way: chili, spaghetti, cheese, and onions
Five-way: chili, spaghetti, cheese, onions, and beans
and optionally, the:
Four-way bean: chili, spaghetti, cheese, and beans (beans substituted for the onions)
The preceding basic menu is entirely traditional. Some chili parlors have altered the traditional menu method, declaring on their menus that a Four-way is chili, spaghetti, cheese, and either onions or beans. Other parlors have added ingredients to the traditional mix. For example, Dixie Chili offers a “Six-way” with the addition of garlic. Oyster crackers are usually served with Cincinnati chili, and a mild hot sauce is frequently used as an optional topping.
When served on a Coney style hot dog, dubbed the “Cheese Coney“, the chili is also topped with grated cheddar cheese. The default coney also includes mustard and a small amount of onion.

 

Cincinnati chili seems to have originated with one or more immigrant restaurateurs from Macedonia who were trying to broaden their customer base by moving beyond narrowly ethnic styles of cuisine. Tom and John Kiradjieff began serving the chili in 1922 at their hot dog stand, next to a burlesque theater called the Empress, after which their Empress chili parlor took its name. Tom Kiradjieff invented the style by modifying a traditional stew and serving it over hot dogs and spaghetti. The style has since been copied and modified by many other restaurant proprietors.
Empress was the main chili parlor in Cincinnati until 1949, when a former Empress employee and Greek immigrant, Nicholas Lambrinides, started another chili restaurant called Skyline Chili. Gold Star Chili came along in 1965, started by the four Daoud brothers who were originally from Jordan.

Cincinnati Style Chili & Cheese Coneys w/ Oyster Crackers

December 14, 2012 at 6:40 PM | Posted in Ball Park Smoked Turkey Franks, Healthy Life Whole Grain Breads, Kraft Cheese | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Cincinnati Style Chili & Cheese Coneys w/ Oyster Crackers
Good news about my Dad, he should be released from rehab next Friday, barring any setbacks. So good news there! A lot less wear on all of us especially Mom as she’s up there every day.

 

On to dinner. Tonight was Cincinnati Style Chili & Cheese Coneys w/ Oyster Crackers! We all always enjoy Coneys! If you take a look at cheese coneys buffalo hot dog 003pictures you’ll see a different Hot Dog, I tried a couple of the Buffalo Hot Dogs that was delivered yesterday from Buffalo Gal. More on those later. The ingredients I need tonight are: Ball Park Smoked White Turkey Franks, Skyline Chili, Kraft 2% Shredded Sharp Cheddar, French’s Yellow Mustard, Frank’s Red Hot Sauce (Optional), Chopped Onions (Optional), and Healthy Life Whole Grain Hot Dog Buns. These are the ingredients that make some excellent Cheese & Chili Coneys! A lot of people add Chopped Onions but I’ve never been a fan of that. I do like adding Hot Sauce to the Dog though, I use Frank’s Red Hot Sauce.

 

 

Yesterday my Buffalo Gal order was delivered so I prepared a couple of the Buffalo Hot Dogs so we could sample them also. I liked them, their very lean as all bison meat is.The taste reminded me more a Brat or Mett than a Hot Dog. I’m saving them for lunch tomorrow. Very quickly just to tell you how to assemble this masterpiece of the Cheese & Chili Coney World it’s: Spread the Hot Dog Bun, Lay your Hot Dog in the Bun, top with Yellow Mustard, add the Chili, top it with Red Hot Sauce (Optional), add the Chopped Onions (Optional), top everything with Kraft 2% Shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese, you’re ready to eat! For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.

cheese coneys buffalo hot dog 002

 

Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers

August 16, 2012 at 6:00 PM | Posted in chili, Kraft Cheese, pasta, Skyline Chili, spaghetti | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu; Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers

 
A really laid back day today. Just wasn’t feeling up to par, allergies I believe. I really didn’t want to have to put much effort into preparing dinner so I went the very easy route of the Microwave! I went with the Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers! They now sell it packaged for the microwave, a bit smaller size than what you get at a Skyline but just right for those still watching calories and carbs. It comes with Spaghetti topped with that wonderful Skyline Chili. You add the Cheese to make it a 3 Way. I grated a block of Kraft 2% Sharp Cheese for a topping for my Chili and also had a half serving of Skyline Oyster Crackers. Overall it was just over 400 calories and 33 carbs. I left a little history of my favorite Chili Spaghetti/Coney place here in the Cincinnati area at the end of the post. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Cherry Jello.

Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers

August 6, 2012 at 5:09 PM | Posted in Kraft Cheese, Skyline Chili, spaghetti, spices and herbs | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu; Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers
The day consisted of cleaning the outdoor shed and then moving inside to clean and organize 2 closets. I really didn’t want to have to put much effort into preparing dinner so I went the very easy route of the Microwave! I went with the Skyline 3 Way – Chili, Spaghetti, Cheese w/ Side of Oyster Crackers! They now sell it packaged for the microwave, a bit smaller size than what you get at a Skyline but just right for those still watching calories and carbs. It comes with Spaghetti topped with that wonderful Skyline Chili. You add the Cheese to make it a 3 Way. I grated a block of Kraft 2% Sharp Cheese for a topping for my Chili and also had a half serving of Skyline Oyster Crackers. Overall it was just over 400 calories and 33 carbs. I left a little history of my favorite Chili Spaghetti/Coney place here in the Cincinnati area at the end of the post. For dessert later a slice of Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread topped with a scoop of Breyer’s Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream.

 

 

Skyline Chili

Skyline Chili is a chain of chili restaurants based in Cincinnati, Ohio. Founded in 1949 by Greek immigrant Nicholas Lambrinides, Skyline Chili is named for the view of Cincinnati’s skyline that Lambrinides could see from his first restaurant (which has since been demolished), opened in the section of town now known as Price Hill. It is also the “official chili” of many local professional sports teams and venues, including the Cincinnati Reds, Columbus Blue Jackets and the Kings Island theme park, and also sponsors the Crosstown Shootout, an annual men’s college basketball rivalry game between the city’s two NCAA Division I teams, Cincinnati and Xavier.

In 1912, Nicholas Lambrinides immigrated to Cincinnati from Kastoria, Greece, and brought his favorite family recipes with him. To save up the money to bring his wife to America as well, he first worked as a cook for a railroad crew and in a hotel kitchen, then opened a short-order diner. After nearly a decade, his wife was able to join him in Cincinnati and they raised five sons.

By World War II, Lambrinides was working as a chef for the original Empress Chili restaurant, where he continued to tinker with a recipe which he had been developing for years. In 1949, he and three of his sons opened their own place on Glenway Avenue, near the top of a steep hill (Price’s or Price Hill). That diner was located at the intersection of what is now Quebec and Glenway Avenue. The owners named it Skyline Chili for its panoramic view of downtown Cincinnati. After some local resistance in the predominantly Roman Catholic neighborhood Skyline developed a large and devoted following – especially on Thursdays and Saturdays, which immediately preceded and proceeded meatless Fridays.

The family opened a second restaurant in 1953 and the growth of the business accelerated in the 1960s; by the end of the century, there were 110 Skyline restaurants, mostly in Ohio, but with additional establishments in other states including Kentucky, Indiana, and Florida.
Skyline Cheese Coney
Lambrinides died in 1962 at the age of 82, but his sons continued to operate and expand the company. They retained the original recipe unchanged, though. According to William Lambrinides, “Dad always said, ‘Don’t change a thing with the recipe – don’t add anything, don’t take out anything, it’s perfect the way it is’.” As a result, Skyline’s version has largely become synonymous with “Cincinnati-style chili“. In 1998, the company was sold to Fleet Equity Partners, a New England investment firm, which promised not to change the recipe (which they reportedly keep locked in a safe).

Skyline Chili is unique in that it is not chili con carne, the meat dish that originated in (and is the state dish of) Texas. Instead, Cincinnati-style chili is a sauce usually used over spaghetti or hot dogs, containing a unique spice blend that gives it a very distinct taste. Officially, the recipe for Skyline Chili is a well-kept family secret among Lambrinides’ surviving children. However, many Skyline patrons and Cincinnatians believe that the unique taste of Skyline Chili comes from chocolate and cinnamon, spices common in Greek cuisine’s meat dishes. The general recipe is not unique to Skyline — “Cincinnati-style” chili is sold by several chili parlors in the area including Empress, Dixie, Gold Star Chili, Camp Washington, Dawson’s School House of Chili, and other chili parlors.

Skyline’s menu includes their signature dishes: cheese coneys (a hot dog topped with Skyline Chili, mustard, onions, and cheese), and 3-ways (spaghetti topped with Skyline Chili and cheese; 4-ways (choice of beans or onions added), and 5-ways (beans and onions both added). Additional menu items include burritos made with Skyline Chili, classic and Greek-style salads, french fries, and baked potatoes topped with Skyline Chili. To accommodate patrons who follow a low carbohydrate diet, Skyline has recently offered low-carb options such as a “coney bowl”—a cheese coney without the bun, and also now serves vegetarian options, using beans and rice in place of chili in many of its dishes.

 

http://skylinechili.com/

Attention all Gold Star Chili lovers, the Footlong is back!

June 18, 2012 at 9:46 AM | Posted in beans, cheese, chili, Food | Leave a comment
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GOLD STAR CHILI
Attention all Gold Star Chili lovers, the Footlong is back!

 

Gold Star Chili, The Flavor of Cincinnati, has announced it is bringing back by popular demand Footlong Cheese Coneys during the summer months. Gold Star Chili is reintroducing three versions of its famous Cincinnati-style Footlong Cheese Coneys, including:

 
*The Classic Cincinnati-style Footlong — A 12-inch Bluegrass hot dog topped with Gold Star’s

Cincinnati-style chili and shredded cheddar cheese on a specially baked Klosterman bun

 
*The Tex Mex Footlong — Topped with Gold Star’s specially blended TexMex chili

 
*The Fire House Footlong — Topped with Gold Star Chili and its unique roasted red pepper sauce and five-pepper spice mix

 
Gold Star also is offering a combo meal featuring a Footlong Cheese Coney, fries and a drink for $5. The $5 Footlong Combo Meals are available for a limited time only, June 8 through Aug. 23, 2009, at all Gold Star Chili locations.

http://www.goldstarchili.com/

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Maybe I'll just have one more...

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A little food, a little art, a lot of love!