Healthy Pork Chop Recipes

November 3, 2018 at 5:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Pork Chop Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Pork Chop Recipes like; Bone-In Pork Chops with Grilled Peaches and Arugula, Pork Chops with Jalapeno-Peach Chutney, and Sauteed Pork Chops with Apples. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018! http://www.eatingwell.com/


Healthy Pork Chop Recipes
Find healthy, delicious pork chop recipes including fried, grilled and breaded pork chops. Healthier recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Bone-In Pork Chops with Grilled Peaches and Arugula
This easy grilling recipe sears both the pork and the peaches on the grill. When peaches are not in season, you can make this recipe with pears or apples instead……

Pork Chops with Jalapeno-Peach Chutney
Try this pork recipe next time you have company. Boneless loin chops are coated with a delicious spice rub and after a quick grilling, served with a spicy-sweet chutney……..

Sauteed Pork Chops with Apples
The Sugar and Spice Rub makes extra. So another time, use it to season pork tenderloin or lean burgers before broiling or grilling………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Pork Chop Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/19273/ingredients/meat-poultry/pork/chops/?page=2

Diabetic Dish of the Week – Grilled Chicken with Cherry Apple Chutney

March 28, 2017 at 5:36 AM | Posted in CooksRecipes, diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Dish of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week’s Diabetic Dish of the Week is Grilled Chicken with Cherry Apple Chutney. Delicious Grilled Chicken and served with tangy chutney made from cherries and tart apples. Splenda Sugar Blend and Splenda Brown Sugar Blend replaces the Sugar in the recipe. You can find this version of the recipe at the CooksRecipes website. The Cooks site has a large selection of recipes for all tastes and cuisines. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.cooksrecipes.com/index.html

 

 

Grilled Chicken with Cherry Apple Chutney

Brining is the secret to marvelously tender and delicious chicken pieces. Grill them up and serve with a sweet and tangy chutney made from cherries and tart apples.

Recipe Ingredients:

Chicken:
1/4 cup Splenda® Sugar Blend
1/2 cup kosher salt
1 cup hot tap water
3 cups cold water
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts
1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs
1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 tablespoon canola oil

Cherry Apple Chutney:
1 cup pitted tart cherries (thawed, if frozen)
1/2 Granny Smith apple, unpeeled, cored, and chopped
1/2 cup finely chopped red onions
1/4 cup Splenda® Brown Sugar Blend
1/4 cup dried cherries
1 tablespoon brewed strong coffee
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
1 grated peel of 1/2 lemon
1/3 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
1 1/2 tablespoons apple juice concentrate
1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint

Cooking Directions:

1 – For Chicken: Combine Splenda® Sugar Blend, salt, and hot water in 1-gallon zipper-lock plastic bag and shake to dissolve Splenda® Sugar Blend and salt. Add cold water and chicken. Press air out of bag, seal, and refrigerate 1 1/2 to 2 hours.
2 – For Cherry Apple Chutney: In medium steel saucepan, combine tart cherries, apples, onions, Splenda® Brown Sugar Blend, dried cherries, coffee, vinegar, lemon peel, and cayenne. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Reduce heat to low and simmer gently 15 to 20 minutes, or until apples are soft and most of liquid evaporates. Remove from heat and stir in juice concentrate and mint. Set aside.
3 – Remove chicken from brine and discard brine. Refrigerate chicken until ready to serve (up to 1 day). Pat chicken dry with paper towels and sprinkle all over with pepper. Let rest at room temperature 20 minutes.
4 – Heat grill to medium-high. Brush grill grate and coat with oil.
5 – Put chicken on grill, cover, and cook 5 to 7 minutes per side, or until chicken is no longer pink and juices run clear (about 170°F / 80°C on an instant-read thermometer). Brush with oil during last 5 minutes. Serve with chutney.
Makes 8 servings.

Nutritional Information Per Serving (1/8 of recipe): Calories 270 | Calories from Fat 80 | Fat 9g (sat 2.0g) | Cholesterol 70mg | Sodium 5760mg | Carbohydrates 21g | Fiber 1g | Sugars 22g | Protein 22g.
http://www.cooksrecipes.com/diabetic/grilled_chicken_with_cherry_apple_chutney_recipe.html

Slow Cooker Appetizers and Side Dishes

October 7, 2016 at 5:15 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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It’s Slow Cooker Appetizers and Side Dishes from the Diabetic Living Online website. Delicious and healthy recipes including; Hot Wing Dip, Broccoli-Cheese Dip with Potato Dippers, and Fruit Chutney with Spiced Chips. Find them all at the Diabetic Living Online website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy! http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Slow Cooker Appetizers and Side DishesDiabetic living logo

Fix these diabetes-friendly appetizers and side dishes quickly, then let them simmer in the slow cooker until they’re ready to serve. We’ve also suggested some fresh salad and vegetable dishes to pair with your slow cooker meals.

 

 

Hot Wing Dip

Blue cheese salad dressing balances the hotness of the bottled Buffalo wing sauce, making this a crowd-pleasing dish. Serve with crisp celery sticks……

 
Broccoli-Cheese Dip with Potato Dippers

Bring this bacon-flavor-infused dip to your next party! Oven-baked potato dippers topped with the cheesy mixture offer a baked-potato taste. Just be sure to count the potato carbs in your meal plan……

 
Fruit Chutney with Spiced Chips

This two-hour slow-simmer dish is a sweet treat for any get-together. Serve the chutney with spiced chips made from whole wheat tortillas and topped with crumbled goat cheese……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Slow Cooker Appetizers and Side Dishes
http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/appetizer/slow-cooker-appetizers-side-dishes

Slow Cooker Appetizers & Side Dishes

February 9, 2016 at 5:53 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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From the Diabetic Living Online website it’s Slow Cooker Appetizers & Side Dishes. You’ll find Hot Wing Dip, Broccoli-Cheese Dip with Potato Dippers, Fruit Chutney with Spiced Chips, and more Diabetic Friendly Recipes. It’s all on the Diabetic Living Online website. http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

 

Slow Cooker Appetizers & Side DishesDiabetic living logo
Fix these diabetes-friendly appetizers and side dishes quickly, then let them simmer in the slow cooker until they’re ready to serve. We’ve also suggested some fresh salad and vegetable dishes to pair with your slow cooker meals.

 

 

Hot Wing Dip

Blue cheese salad dressing balances the hotness of the bottled Buffalo wing sauce, making this a crowd-pleasing dish. Serve with crisp celery sticks……

 
Broccoli-Cheese Dip with Potato Dippers

Bring this bacon-flavor-infused dip to your next party! Oven-baked potato dippers topped with the cheesy mixture offer a baked-potato taste. Just be sure to count the potato carbs in your meal plan……

 
Fruit Chutney with Spiced Chips

This two-hour slow-simmer dish is a sweet treat for any get-together. Serve the chutney with spiced chips made from whole wheat tortillas and topped with crumbled goat cheese……..

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Slow Cooker Appetizers & Side Dishes

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/appetizer/slow-cooker-appetizers-side-dishes

Condiment of the Week – Chutney

January 7, 2016 at 5:55 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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Chatney, Chatni

Chatney, Chatni

Chutney (Hindi/ Nepali – “चटनी” also transliterated chatney or chatni, Sindhi: چٽڻي‎) is a side dish in the cuisines of the Indian subcontinent that can vary from a tomato relish to a ground peanut garnish or a yogurt, cucumber and mint dip.

An offshoot that took root in Anglo-Indian cuisine is usually a tart fruit such as sharp apples, rhubarb or damson pickle made milder by an equal weight of sugar (usually demerara or brown sugar to replace jaggery in some Indian sweet chutneys) Vinegar was added to the recipe for English-style chutney that traditionally aims to give a long shelf life so that fall fruit can be preserved for use throughout the year (as are jams, jellies and pickles) or else to be sold as a commercial product. Indian pickles use mustard oil as a pickling agent, but Anglo-Indian style chutney uses malt or cider vinegar which produces a milder product that in western cuisine is usually eaten with a Cheddar-type cheese or with cold meats and fowl, typically in cold pub lunches.

Nowadays, some of the making of pickles and chutneys that at one time in India was done entirely in people’s homes has partly passed over into commercial production. The disadvantage of commercial chutneys and those produced in western style with vinegar and large amounts of sugar is that the main aim of sugar and vinegar as preservatives is to make the product safe for long-term consumption. Regular consumption of these products (as distinct from the original Indian array of fresh relishes) can add to total sugar consumption being increased to unhealthy levels.

In India, chutneys can be either made alongside pickles that are matured in the sun for up to two weeks and kept up to a year or, more usually, are freshly made from fresh ingredients that can be kept a couple of days or a week in the refrigerator.

In south India, Thogayal or Thuvayal (Tamil) are preparations similar to chutney but with a pasty consistency.

Medicinal plants that are believed to have a beneficial effect are sometimes made into chutneys, for example Pirandai Thuvayal or ridged gourd chutney (Peerkangai Thuvayal). Ridged gourd can be bought in Chinese and Indian shops in large towns in the west. and, when dried, becomes a bath sponge known as a luffa or loofah.

Bitter gourd can also serve as a base for a chutney which is like a relish or, alternatively as a dried powder.

Occasionally, chutneys that contrast in taste and colour can be served together — a favorite combination being a green mint and chili chutney with a contrasting sweet brown tamarind and date chutney.

Chutneys may be ground with a mortar and pestle or an ammikkal (Tamil). Spices are added and ground, usually in a particular order; the wet paste thus made is sauteed in vegetable oil, usually gingelly (sesame) or peanut oil. Electric blenders or food processors can be used as labor-saving alternatives to stone grinding.

American and European-style chutneys are usually fruit, vinegar, and sugar cooked down to a reduction, with added

Mango chutney

Mango chutney

flavourings. These may include sugar, salt, garlic, tamarind, onion or ginger. Western-style chutneys originated from Anglo-Indians at the time of the British Raj recreated Indian chutneys using English orchard fruits — sour cooking apples and rhubarb, for example. They would often contain dried fruit: raisins, currants and sultanas.

They were a way to use a glut of fall fruit and preserving techniques were similar to sweet fruit preserves using approximately an equal weight of fruit and sugar, the vinegar and sugar acting as preservatives.

South Indian chutney powders are made from roasted dried lentils to be sprinkled on idlis and dosas. Peanut chutneys can be made wet or as a dry powder.

Spices commonly used in chutneys include fenugreek, coriander, cumin and asafoetida (hing). Other prominent ingredients and combinations include cilantro, capsicum, mint (coriander and mint chutneys are often called hari chutney, Hindi for “green”), Tamarind or Imli (often called meethi chutney, as meethi in Hindi means “sweet”), sooth (or saunth, made with dates and ginger), coconut, onion, prune, tomato, red chili, green chili, mango lime (made from whole, unripe limes), garlic, coconut, peanut, dahi, green tomato, dhaniya pudina (cilantro and mint), peanut (shengdana chutney in Marathi), ginger, yogurt, red chili powder, tomato onion chutney, cilantro mint coconut chutney and apricot.

Major Grey’s Chutney is a type of sweet and spicy chutney popular in the United Kingdom and the United States. The recipe was reportedly created by a 19th-century British Army officer of the same name (likely apocryphal) who presumably lived in Colonial India. Its characteristic ingredients are mango, raisins, vinegar, lime juice, onion, tamarind extract, sweetening and spices. Several companies produce a Major Grey’s Chutney, in India, the UK and the US.

 

 

Chutneys

Chutneys

Similar in preparation and usage to a pickle, simple spiced chutneys can be dated to 500 BC. Originating in India, this method of preserving food was subsequently adopted by the Romans and later British empires, who then started exporting this to the colonies, Australia and North America.

As greater imports of foreign and varied foods increased into northern Europe, chutney fell out of favor. This combined with a greater ability to refrigerate fresh foods and an increasing amount of glasshouses meant chutney and pickle were relegated to military and colonial use. Chutney reappeared in India around the 1780s as a popular appetizer

Diego Álvarez Chanca brought back chili peppers from the Americas. After discovering their medicinal properties, Chanca developed a chutney to administer them. This coincided with the British Royal Navy’s use of a lime pickle or chutney to ward off scurvy on journeys to the new world.

In the early 17th century, British colonization of the Indian subcontinent relied on preserved food stuffs such as lime pickles, chutneys and marmalades. (Marmalades proved unpopular due to their sweetness and a lack of available sugar.)

Beginning in the 17th century, fruit chutneys were shipped to European countries like England and France as luxury goods. These imitations were called “mangoed” fruits or vegetables, the word ‘chutney’ still being associated with the lower working classes.

Major Grey’s Chutney is thought to have been developed by a British officer who had traveled to India. The formula was eventually sold to Crosse and Blackwell, a major British food manufacturer, probably in the early 1800s. In the 19th century, types of chutney like Major Grey’s or Bengal Club created for Western tastes were shipped to Europe from Monya.

Generally these chutneys are fruit, vinegar, and sugar cooked down to a reduction.

The tradition of chutney-making spread through the English-speaking world, especially in the Caribbean and American South, where chutney is a popular condiment for ham, pork, and fish.

 

Slow Cooker Appetizers & Side Dishes

September 24, 2015 at 4:46 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetic Living On Line | Leave a comment
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Some of my best dinners come out of the Crock Pot. So easy to prepare and always an easy cleanup. From the Diabetic Living Online website it’s Slow Cooker Appetizers & Side Dishes. You can find all your Diabetic Friendly Recipes on the site. Dinners, Side Dishes, Desserts, check out Diabetic Living Online. http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/

 

Diabetic living logo
Slow Cooker Appetizers & Side Dishes
Fix these diabetes-friendly appetizers and side dishes quickly, then let them simmer in the slow cooker until they’re ready to serve. We’ve also suggested some fresh salad and vegetable dishes to pair with your slow cooker meals.

 

 

Hot Wing Dip

Blue cheese salad dressing balances the hotness of the bottled Buffalo wing sauce, making this a crowd-pleasing dish. Serve with crisp celery sticks…….

 
Broccoli-Cheese Dip with Potato Dippers

Bring this bacon-flavor-infused dip to your next party! Oven-baked potato dippers topped with the cheesy mixture offer a baked-potato taste. Just be sure to count the potato carbs in your meal plan……

 
Fruit Chutney with Spiced Chips

This two-hour slow-simmer dish is a sweet treat for any get-together. Serve the chutney with spiced chips made from whole wheat tortillas and topped with crumbled goat cheese……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Slow Cooker Appetizers & Side Dishes

http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/appetizer/slow-cooker-appetizers-side-dishes

One of America’s Favorites – Fruit Preserves

August 5, 2013 at 9:27 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 1 Comment
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Fruit preserves are preparations of fruits, vegetables and sugar, often canned or sealed for long-term storage. The preparation of fruit

Strawberry jam, one type of common fruit preserve

Strawberry jam, one type of common fruit preserve

preserves today often involves adding commercial or natural pectin as a gelling agent, although sugar or honey may be used, as well. Before World War II, fruit preserve recipes did not include pectin, and many artisan jams today are made without pectin. The ingredients used and how they are prepared determine the type of preserves; jams, jellies and marmalades are all examples of different styles of fruit preserves that vary based upon the ingredients used.
Many varieties of fruit preserves are made globally, including sweet fruit preserves, such as strawberry, as well as savory preserves of culinary vegetables, such as tomatoes or squash. In American English, the plural form “preserves” is used to describe all types of jams and jellies. In British and Commonwealth English most fruit preserves are simply called jam, with the singular preserve being applied to high fruit content jam, often for marketing purposes. Additionally, the name of the type of fruit preserves will also vary depending on the regional variant of English being used.
Variations

Five varieties of fruit preserves (clockwise from top): apple, quince, plum, squash, orange (in the center)

Five varieties of fruit preserves (clockwise from top): apple, quince, plum, squash, orange (in the center)

Chutney
A chutney is a pungent relish of Indian origin made of fruit, spices and herbs. Although originally intended to be eaten soon after production, modern chutneys are often made to be sold, so require preservatives – often sugar and vinegar – to ensure they have a suitable shelf life. Mango chutney, for example, is mangoes reduced with sugar.

 

 

Confit
While confit, the past participle of the French verb confire, “to preserve”, is most often applied to preservation of meats, it is also used for fruits or vegetables seasoned and cooked with honey or sugar till jam-like. Savory confits, such as ones made with garlic or fennel, may call for a savory oil, such as virgin olive oil, as the preserving agent.

 

 

A conserve

A conserve, or whole fruit jam, is a jam made of fruit stewed in sugar.
Often the making of conserves can be trickier than making a standard jam, because the balance between cooking, or sometimes steeping in the hot sugar mixture for just enough time to allow the flavor to be extracted from the fruit, and sugar to penetrate the fruit, and cooking too long that fruit will break down and liquefy. This process can also be achieved by spreading the dry sugar over raw fruit in layers, and leaving for several hours to steep into the fruit, then just heating the resulting mixture only to bring to the setting point. As a result of this minimal cooking, some fruits are not particularly suitable for making into conserves, because they require cooking for longer periods to avoid issues such as tough skins. Currants and gooseberries, and a number of plums are among these fruits.
Because of this shorter cooking period, not as much pectin will be released from the fruit, and as such, conserves (particularly home-made conserves) will sometimes be slightly softer set than some jams.
An alternative definition holds that conserves are preserves made from a mixture of fruits and/or vegetables. Conserves may also include dried fruit or nuts.

 

 

Fruit butter
Fruit butter, in this context, refers to a process where the whole fruit is forced through a sieve or blended after the heating process.
“Fruit butters are generally made from larger fruits, such as apples, plums, peaches or grapes. Cook until softened and run through a sieve to give a smooth consistency. After sieving, cook the pulp … add sugar and cook as rapidly as possible with constant stirring… The finished product should mound up when dropped from a spoon, but should not cut like jelly. Neither should there be any free liquid.”—Berolzheimer R (ed) et al. (1959)

 

 

Fruit curd
Fruit curd is a dessert topping and spread usually made with lemon, lime, orange, or raspberry. The basic ingredients are beaten egg yolks, sugar, fruit juice and zest which are gently cooked together until thick and then allowed to cool, forming a soft, smooth, intensely flavored spread. Some recipes also include egg whites and/or butter.

 
Fruit spread
Fruit spread refers to a jam or preserve with no added sugar.

 
Jam
Jam typically contains both the juice and flesh of a fruit or vegetable, although some cookbooks define it as a cooked and jelled puree.
In the US, the term “jam” refers to a product made of whole fruit cut into pieces or crushed then heated with water and sugar to activate its pectin before being put into containers:
“Jams are usually made from pulp and juice of one fruit, rather than a combination of several fruits. Berries and other small fruits are most frequently used, though larger fruits such as apricots, peaches, or plums cut into small pieces or crushed are also used for jams. Good jam has a soft even consistency without distinct pieces of fruit, a bright color, a good fruit flavor and a semi-jellied texture that is easy to spread but has no free liquid.” – Berolzheimer R (ed) et al. (1959 )
Freezer jam is uncooked (or cooked less than 5 minutes), then stored frozen. It is popular in parts of North America for its very fresh taste…

 

 

Jelly
Jelly is an American term for clear or translucent fruit spread made from sweetened fruit (or vegetable) juice and set using naturally occurring pectin (the word signifies a gelatin based dessert in British English). Additional pectin may be added where the original fruit does not supply enough, for example with grapes. Jelly can be made from sweet, savory or hot ingredients. It is made by a process similar to that used for making jam, with the additional step of filtering out the fruit pulp after the initial heating. A muslin or stockinette “jelly bag” is traditionally used as a filter, suspended by string over a bowl to allow the straining to occur gently under gravity. It is important not to attempt to force the straining process, for example by squeezing the mass of fruit in the muslin, or the clarity of the resulting jelly will be compromised. Jelly can come in all sorts of flavors such as grape jelly, strawberry jelly and much more. It also can be used on or with a variety of foods. This includes jelly with toast, or a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
“Good jelly is clear and sparkling and has a fresh flavor of the fruit from which it is made. It is tender enough to quiver when moved, but holds angles when cut.
EXTRACTING JUICEPectin is best extracted from the fruit by heat, therefore cook the fruit until soft before straining to obtain the juice … Pour cooked fruit into a jelly bag which has been wrung out of cold water. Hang up and let drain. When dripping has ceased the bag may be squeezed to remove remaining juice, but this may cause cloudy jelly.” – Berolzheimer R (ed) et al. (1959)

 

 

Marmalade
Marmalade is a fruit preserve made from the juice and peel of citrus fruits boiled with sugar and water. It can be produced from lemons, limes, grapefruits, mandarins, sweet oranges, bergamots and other citrus fruits, or any combination thereof.
The benchmark citrus fruit for marmalade production in Britain is the Spanish Seville orange, Citrus aurantium var. aurantium, prized for its high pectin content, which gives a good set. The peel has a distinctive bitter taste which it imparts to the preserve. In America marmalade is sweet.
Marmalade is generally distinguished from jam by its fruit peel.

 

 

In general, jam is produced by taking mashed or chopped fruit or vegetable pulp and boiling it with sugar and water. The proportion of

Jam being made in a pot

Jam being made in a pot

sugar and fruit varies according to the type of fruit and its ripeness, but a rough starting point is equal weights of each. When the mixture reaches a temperature of 104 °C (219 °F), the acid and the pectin in the fruit react with the sugar, and the jam will set on cooling. However, most cooks work by trial and error, bringing the mixture to a “fast rolling boil”, watching to see if the seething mass changes texture, and dropping small samples on a plate to see if they run or set.
Commercially produced jams are usually produced using one of two methods. The first is the open pan method, which is essentially a larger scale version of the method a home jam maker would use. This gives a traditional flavor, with some caramelization of the sugars. The second commercial process involves the use of a vacuum vessel, where the jam is placed under a vacuum, which has the effect of reducing its boiling temperature to anywhere between 65 and 80 °C depending on the recipe and the end result desired. The lower boiling temperature enables the water to be driven off as it would be when using the traditional open pan method, but with the added benefit of retaining more of the volatile flavor compounds from the fruit, preventing caramelization of the sugars, and of course reducing the overall energy required to make the product. However, once the desired amount of water has been driven off, the jam still needs to be heated briefly to 95 to 100 °C to kill off any micro-organisms that may be present; the vacuum pan method does not kill them all.
During commercial filling it is common to use a flame to sterilize the rim and lid of jars to destroy any yeasts and molds which may cause spoilage during storage. Steam is commonly injected immediately prior to lidding to create a vacuum, which both helps prevent spoilage and pulls down tamper-evident safety button when used.

 

 

Glass jars are an efficient method of storing and preserving jam. Though sugar can keep for exceedingly long times, containing it in a jar is far more useful than older methods. Other methods of packaging jam, especially for industrially produced products, include cans, and plastic packets, especially used in the food service industry for individual servings.

 

 

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