One of America’s Favorites – Christmas Ham

November 28, 2022 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A traditional Swedish Christmas ham

A Christmas ham or Yule ham is a ham often served for Christmas dinner or during Yule in Northern Europe and the Anglosphere. The style of preparation varies widely by place and time.

Despite the common claim that the tradition of eating ham is related to the Germanic pagan ritual of sacrificing a wild boar known as a sonargöltr to the Norse god Freyr during harvest festivals, this is highly dubious. In fact, in the United States, ham only became popular as a Christmas food in the 20th century.

American traditions
As of 2019, Americans purchase about as much ham as turkey around the holiday season. This was a long time coming. Ham began being mentioned as a Christmas dish in around 1900, and started growing in popularity in about 1960. The holiday ham began being promoted by Armour & Company in 1916 as part of its marketing efforts for its novel industrially quick-cured and less salty hams. The baked Christmas ham with a clove-studded, diamond-hatched sugar glaze which became popular in the 20th century was introduced in the 1930s. Glazed hams had long been popular long before that, but until the 1880s, they were usually glazed with stock, not sugar, and were not associated with Christmas.

The sugar-glazed ham has become identified with Southern cooking.

There are also various regional recipes. Stuffed ham is popular in southern Maryland, and particularly St. Mary’s County, where it is traditional to stuff a corned ham with greens such as kale and cabbage. This tradition has been around in the area for at least 200 years. Similar stuffed hams are also sometimes prepared in Kentucky.

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One of America’s Favorites – Candy Cane

December 13, 2021 at 6:03 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A traditional candy cane

A candy cane is a cane-shaped stick candy often associated with Christmastide, as well as Saint Nicholas Day. It is traditionally white with red stripes and flavored with peppermint, but they also come in a variety of other flavors and colors.

A record of the 1837 Exhibition of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, where confections were judged competitively, mentions “stick candy”. A recipe for straight peppermint candy sticks, white with colored stripes, was published in 1844. The “candy cane” is found in literature in 1866, though no description of color or flavor was provided. The Nursery monthly magazine noted them in association with Christmas in 1874, and the Babyland magazine mentioned canes being hung on Christmas trees in 1882.

A common folkloric story of the origin of candy canes says that in 1670, in Cologne, Germany, the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral, wishing to remedy the noise caused by children in his church during the Living Crèche tradition of Christmas Eve, asked a local candy maker for some “sugar sticks” for them. In order to justify the practice of giving candy to children during worship services, he asked the candy maker to add a crook to the top of each stick, which would help children remember the shepherds who visited the infant Jesus. In addition, he used the white color of the converted sticks to teach children about the Christian belief in the sinless life of Jesus. From Germany, candy canes spread to other parts of Europe, where they were handed out during plays reenacting the Nativity. The candy cane became associated with Christmastide.

A striped candy cane being made by hand from a large mass of red and white sugar syrup

As with other forms of stick candy, the earliest canes were manufactured by hand. Chicago confectioners the Bunte Brothers filed one of the earliest patents for candy cane making machines in the early 1920s.

In 1919 in Albany, Georgia, Robert McCormack began making candy canes for local children and by the middle of the century, his company (originally the Famous Candy Company, then the Mills-McCormack Candy Company, and later Bobs Candies) had become one of the world’s leading candy cane producers. Candy cane manufacturing initially required significant labor that limited production quantities; the canes had to be bent manually as they came off the assembly line to create their curved shape and breakage often ran over 20 percent. McCormack’s brother-in-law, Gregory Harding Keller, was a seminary student in Rome who spent his summers working in the candy factory back home. In 1957, Keller, as an ordained Roman Catholic priest of the Diocese of Little Rock, patented his invention, the Keller Machine, which automated the process of twisting soft candy into spiral striping and cutting it into precise lengths as candy canes.

On Saint Nicholas Day celebrations, candy canes are given to children as they are also said to represent the crosier of the Christian bishop, Saint Nicholas; crosiers allude to the Good Shepherd, a name sometimes used to refer to Jesus of Nazareth.

 

Leftovers – Ham and Swiss Sandwich w/ Mashed Potatoes and Deviled Egg

December 26, 2020 at 6:53 PM | Posted in Ham, leftovers | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Leftovers – Ham and Swiss Sandwich w/ Mashed Potatoes and Deviled Egg

 

 

For Breakfast I toasted a Thomas Light English Muffin and topped it with Smucker’s Sugarless Blackberry Jam. Also had my morning cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Sunny and 36 degrees out today. Not a thing going on today. Did some small chores around the house, changed the furnace filters and such. Then caught up on some shows I had recorded. For Dinner it’s Christmas Dinner Leftovers. I made a Ham and Swiss Sandwich w/ Mashed Potatoes and Deviled Egg. Stay safe everyone!

 

Plenty of leftovers from the Christmas Dinner Feast! And thank goodness for leftovers because I really didn’t feel like cooking. We almost always use Cook’s Ham when we bake a Ham. So with the Ham we baked yesterday, we made some into some delicious Ham Sandwiches. Just took a few slices and serving it on Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. The Ham is so delicious and moist. And as always with Cook’s Ham, perfect seasoning! We’ll have quite a few Breakfasts and Lunches out of this. To make the Sandwich I used Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. Topped it with a bit of Kraft Light Mayo with Olive Oil, French’s Yellow Mustard, and a slice of Boar’s Head Swiss Cheese. Love this Sandwich!

 

For a side I heated up the leftover Bob Evan’s Mashed Potatoes and I had a leftover Deviled Eggs. Just love these leftovers! It’s sometimes better the second time around! For Dessert/Snack a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Snyder’s Pretzels with a Coke Zero to drink.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cook’s Hams

Semi-Boneless Hams
Classic Reduced Sodium Half (Serves: 15-20)
Half (Serves: 15-20)
Whole (Serves: 30-40)
Semi-Boneless Hams

Cook’s Semi-Boneless Hams are now fully cooked! This means they may be eaten cold or heated. The ham only needs to be heated through if serving warm.
With fewer bones and less fat, Cook’s Semi-Boneless Hams are a great value. With two of the three bones removed, carving and serving are much easier. With only the center bone remaining, your family can still can enjoy the great taste and flavor that only a Cook’s bone-in ham can offer, plus the added value of more lean meat and the convenience of less bone.

Ingredients
CURED WITH: Water, Dextrose, Salt, Sodium Phosphate, Sodium Nitrite.
http://www.mycooksham.com/product/bone-in-premium-semi-boneless

One of America’s Favorites – Cranberry Sauce

November 23, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Cranberry sauce

Cranberry sauce or cranberry jam is a sauce or relish made out of cranberries, commonly served as a condiment or a side dish with Thanksgiving dinner in North America and Christmas dinner in the United Kingdom and Canada. There are differences in flavor depending on the geography of where the sauce is made: in Europe it is generally slightly sour-tasting, while in North America it is typically more heavily sweetened.

The recipe for cranberry sauce appears in the 1796 edition of The Art of Cookery by Amelia Simmons, the first known cookbook authored by an American.

Although the Pilgrims may have been aware of the wild cranberries growing in the Massachusetts Bay area, sugar was scarce, so it’s unlikely that cranberry sauce would have been among the dishes served at the First Thanksgiving meal. Cranberries aren’t mentioned by any primary sources for the First Thanksgiving meal. The only foods mentioned are “Indian corn”, wild turkey and waterfowl, and venison. The rest remains a matter of speculation among food historians. Although stuffings are not mentioned in primary sources, it was a common way to prepare birds for the table in the 17th century. According to a “Thanksgiving Primer” published by the Plimoth Plantation, cranberries may have been used in the stuffing recipes, but it’s unlikely they would have been made into a sauce because sugar was very scarce.

Cranberry sauce was first offered to consumers in North America in 1912 in Hanson, Massachusetts. Canned cranberry sauce appeared on the market in 1941, allowing the product to be sold year-round. Cranberry sauce can be used with a variety of meats, including turkey, pork, chicken, and ham.

Cranberry jelly from a can, sliced

The most basic cranberry sauce consists of cranberries boiled in sugar water until the berries pop and the mixture thickens. Some recipes include other ingredients such as slivered almonds, orange juice, zest, ginger, maple syrup, port, or cinnamon.

Commercial cranberry sauce may be loose and uncondensed, or condensed or jellied and sweetened with various ingredients. The jellied form may be slipped out of a can onto a dish, and served sliced or intact for slicing at the table.

Cranberry sauce is often eaten in conjunction with turkey for Christmas in the United Kingdom and Canada or Thanksgiving in the United States and Canada, and it is only rarely eaten or served in other contexts there.

 

 

Christmas Dinner…….

December 25, 2019 at 6:24 PM | Posted in cooking, Food | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: No post today…….

We are having Turkey along with all the trimmings and side dishes with family and friends. There will be no Dinner Post today but I’ll be back tomorrow! I would just like to wish all of you a Merry Christmas and a Happy 2020 New Year! Take care all……

Merry Christmas Everyone!

December 25, 2019 at 7:48 AM | Posted in Food | 3 Comments
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Merry Christmas Everyone and a Happy 2020 New Year!

 

Mom’s making Buckeyes and Walnut Chocolate Fudge!

December 24, 2019 at 7:24 AM | Posted in baking, dessert | 2 Comments
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I wish you could all get a whiff of the Chocolate aroma in the kitchen today! Mom is making her area famous yearly batches of Buckeyes and Walnut Chocolate Fudge! Everyone that’s had the Buckeyes are of the same opinion, the best they’ve ever had! The thing that sets these apart from other Buckeye Candies is the Rice Krispies she adds. So if you’re looking for a Buckeye Candy Recipe, look no further. Same with the Walnut Fudge, such a creamy, deep and rich Chocolate taste! The bad part is neither is Diabetic Friendly, but I’ll still have a half a piece of each from time to time. And both make perfect Christmas Gifts that everyone enjoys!

The Old Family Buckeye Recipe
It’s that time of year when the requests start coming in for my Mom’s Buckeyes. Back when I was working I was everyone’s favorite person when I would bring in a batch of my Mom’s Buckeyes. It’s been 15 years since I lost my leg to melanoma cancer and unable to work but to this day I still get request’s from fellow past workers for my Mom’s Buckeyes. It seems that everyone that has had them all say the same thing “The best Buckeyes I’ve ever had!” I think it’s the Rice Krispies that sets them apart from other Buckeye Candies. When you make a batch of these and try them I’m sure you’ll agree, let me know! These are not diabetes friendly but they are delicious. We tried making them by using reduced fat Peanut Butter and Sugar Free Chocolate but they just didn’t come out the same.

Buckeyes!

Ingredients:

Recipe will make about 60 Buckeyes

1 – Stick Butter, Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter
1 – Box (1 LB) Confectioner Sugar
2 – Cups Jiff Smooth Peanut Butter
3 – Cups Rice Krispies
1 – 12 oz. Package Chocolate Chips
1 – Small Bar Hershey’s Milk Chocolate
1/2 Bar Paraffin Wax
Directions:

* In a large bowl mix Butter, Sugar, Peanut Butter, and Rice Krispies (With Hands)
* Chill the mixture for at least 2 hours.
* Then take the mixture and roll into individual balls. The size can vary no set size.
* Melt all the Chocolate and Paraffin Wax in a double broiler or in a sauce pan on low heat stirring until smooth.
* With one or two forks dip each of the balls into the Chocolate/Wax. Drain excess off the balls and place on a sheet pan covered with wax paper and refrigerate for several hours until Chocolate has hardened into a shell covering the balls.
* Now enjoy them!

Well like the Buckeye recipe above this ones not so Diabetic friendly but they sure are good! You can make it a somewhat lower in calories and carbs by using Splenda instead of the Sugar it calls for. This is a great Fudge recipe, it just melts in your mouth. My Mom has made this for as long as I can remember. Hope you enjoy it as much as all of us. Enjoy!

Chocolate Walnut Fudge

Walnut Fudge
Ingredients:

3 Cups Sugar or Splenda Equivalent
3/4 Cup Margarine
2/3 Cup Evaporated Milk
7 oz. Jar of Marshmallow Cream
1 12 oz. bag Toll House Chocolate Chips
1 Cup Chopped Walnuts (More if wanted, to taste)
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract

Instructions:

Combine Sugar, Margarine, and Evap. Milk in a large pot and heat to a boil for 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Remove from heat and add Chocolate Chips, Marshmallow Cream, Nuts, and Vanilla stirring till well mixed. Pour mixture into a greased 13×9 pan. Refrigerate until firm. Cut into desired size pieces.

* You may be tempted to leave the heat on while stirring the chips. While this would normally be ok, you really shouldn’t do that in this recipe. If the mixture stays at a boiling temperature, you may be in for a nasty surprise when you add the vanilla. Bottom line: it’s safer for you and better for the fudge if the mixture cools down just a tad before the vanilla goes in. As long as you keep stirring, the chips will melt just fine.

Lebanon Horse Drawn Carriage Parade and Christmas Festival

December 6, 2019 at 12:46 PM | Posted in Festivals | Leave a comment
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Where We’re Located
HISTORIC DOWNTOWN LEBANON
Mulberry Street
Lebanon, OH 45036

Dates and Times
Lebanon Horse Drawn Carriage Parade and Christmas Festival
Historic Downtown Lebanon Sat, Dec 07, 2019
10:00 am to 8:00 pm

 

 

More than 100 horse-drawn carriages, street fair, shops, eateries and entertainment.
Known as the Lebanon Horse Parade, the Lebanon Horse Drawn Carriage Parade & Christmas Festival in Lebanon, Ohio is hosted by The Lebanon Area Chamber of Commerce. The Lebanon Horse Drawn Carriage Parade & Christmas Festival is always held on the first Saturday in December. There will be two horse-drawn carriage parades: a daylight parade at 1 pm and the traditional candlelight parade at 7 pm. Festivities continue to grow, and are sure to include: gift and food vendors stationed along E. Mulberry Street, Christmas carolers, traveling bell choir, storytelling, Paso Fino Horse Demonstrations, musical entertainment, train ride to the North Pole on the North Pole Express visits with Santa and Mrs. Claus, street characters, and extended business hours for our 80-plus antique and specialty stores. This is a free family event!

https://www.facebook.com/lebanoncarriageparade/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 25, 2018 at 6:00 AM | Posted in baking, cooking, Food | Leave a comment
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MERRY CHRISTMAS Everyone!

Christmas Eve

December 24, 2018 at 7:04 PM | Posted in cooking, Food | 2 Comments
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Hi everyone and Merry Christmas! We are having a a Christmas Eve Party tonight and its all Appetizers and Sandwiches. Yesterday I went to Kroger and purchased Lunch Meat and Cheese to make Meat and Cheese Tray. Then I bought a loaf of Mini Cocktail Rye Bread and a Pork Tenderloin Roast. I’ll bake the Roast and slice it thin and lightly bake the Rye Bread and make Mini Pork Tenderloin Sandwiches, with Spicy Mustard and Horseradish Sauce on the side for toppings. Finally I bought a couple of Frozen Appetizers for the Kids that I’ll bake.

Merry Christmas all!

 

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