Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream

December 10, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Diabetes Self Management | Leave a comment
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What goes better with Meatloaf than Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream. These are made using Baking Potatoes, Cauliflower, Reduced Fat Sour Cream, Chives, Salt, and Black Pepper. You can find this recipe, like the Meatloaf Recipe, at the Diabetes Self Management website where you’ll find a huge selection of Diabetic Friendly Recipes, Diabetes News, Diabetes Management Tips, and More! So be sure to check it out today. Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/

Mashed Potatoes and Cauliflower with Sour Cream

Ingredients
12 ounces baking potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 2 1/2 cups)
1 1/4 pounds cauliflower, cut into 1-inch pieces (about 4 1/2 cups)
1/3 cup reduced-fat sour cream
1 tablespoon chives
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Directions
1 – Combine cauliflower and potatoes in large saucepan; cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer about 10 to 12 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Drain.

2 – Add sour cream, chives, salt, and pepper to saucepan. Using potato masher, mash until blended.

Yield: 6 servings.

Serving size: 1/2 cup.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:
Calories: 83 calories, Carbohydrates: 16 g, Protein: 4 g, Fat: 2 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 7 mg, Sodium: 233 mg, Fiber: 3 g
https://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/recipes/sides/mashed-potatoes-cauliflower-sour-cream/

Baked Salmon w/ Roasted Asparagus

September 25, 2019 at 6:35 PM | Posted in fish, salmon | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Baked Salmon w/ Roasted Asparagus

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I prepared a Jimmy Dean Simple Scramble Cup – Crumbled Turkey Sausage, Egg Whites, and Shredded Cheddar Cheese. Also had a cup of Bigelow Decaf Green Tea. Partly cloudy and 83 degrees out today. After Breakfast I headed out to Meijer for a few items and on the way back stopped by McDonald’s and picked up Breakfast for Mom. After Lunch I got the cart out and did some yard work. For Dinner tonight I prepared a Baked Salmon w/ Roasted Asparagus.

 

 

 

I purchased a package of North Atlantic Salmon from Meijer earlier in the day. To make it I’ll need the Salmon, McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Peppercorn Medley, Dried Parsley, Dried Chive, and Extra Light Olive Oil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

To prepare it; I preheated the oven on 400 degrees. I then got a small baking pan and sprayed it with Pam Cooking Spray. I washed the Fillet off in cold water and patted dry with a paper towel. Next I put a light coat of the Extra Light Olive Oil on the Fillet and then seasoned. Put the Fillet in the pan and baked. I baked it for 10 minutes, and done. Excellent Salmon!

 

 

 

 

 

For a side I prepared Roasted Asparagus. To prepare it I’ll need; 1 bunch of Asparagus, 1 Tablespoon of Crumbled Bacon or Bacon Bits, Ground Garlic Salt, Sea Salt, Freshly Ground Black Pepper, and 1 tbsp Extra Light Olive Oil. To prepare it is easy; Preheat the oven to 400F. Place the Asparagus in a baking tray sheet. Add the Bacon, Garlic Salt, Salt, Pepper, and Extra Light Olive Oil and toss to coat. Bake for 10 minutes. Remove from oven. Cool a couple of minutes and serve. Comes out tender and delicious. I like the combo of Baked Salmon and Roasted Asparagus! For Dessert later a bowl of Skinny Pop – Pop Corn and a Diet Mango/Tea Snapple.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Atlantic Salmon
The Atlantic salmon is a species of ray-finned fish in the family Salmonidae. It is found in the northern Atlantic Ocean, in rivers that flow into the north Atlantic and, due to human introduction, in the north Pacific Ocean.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_salmon

 

Turkey and Hashbrown Brunch Lasagna

September 13, 2019 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Jennie-O, Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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For a second Jennie – O Turkey recipe I have a Turkey and Hashbrown Brunch Lasagna. This one is made using JENNIE-O® Slow Roasted Dark Turkey along with Shredded Hash Browns, Egg Substitute, Half and Half, Chives, Shredded Cheddar Cheese, and Flour Tortillas. Wow this sounds like one delicious dish! You can find this recipe along with all the other Delicious and Healthy Recipes at the Jennie – O Turkey website. Enjoy and Make the SWITCH in 2019! https://www.jennieo.com/

Turkey and Hashbrown Brunch Lasagna
Lasagna isn’t just for dinner anymore. When it’s layered with crispy hash browns and slow roasted dark turkey, you can enjoy it for brunch.

INGREDIENTS
8 ounces JENNIE-O® Slow Roasted Dark Turkey, shredded
1 pound frozen shredded hash browns
10 large eggs or 2½ cups egg substitute
¼ cup half-and-half
1 tablespoon butter
2 tablespoons finely chopped chives
kosher salt
freshly ground pepper
6 (6-inch) flour tortillas
2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
sour cream, chopped fresh chives, if desired

DIRECTIONS
1) Heat oven to 350°F.
2) In large non-stick skillet over medium heat, heat turkey 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from skillet and keep warm. Add hash browns and cook, stirring often, until lightly browned. Remove from heat.
3) In large bowl, whisk together eggs and half-and-half until light and frothy. In large non-stick skillet over medium heat, melt butter. Reduce heat to low and add egg mixture and cook, stirring often, until eggs are just set. Stir in chives, season with salt and pepper; Remove from heat.
4) Lightly spray 11 x 7-inch baking dish with non-stick cooking spray, add layer of tortillas. Top with half of the hash browns, eggs, cheese and turkey. Repeat with remaining ingredients, finishing with a layer of tortillas and cheese. Bake until heated through and cheese is melted, about 30 minutes. Garnish with sour cream and chives, if desired.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING

Calories 320
Protein 22g
Carbohydrates 24g
Fiber 1g
Sugars 1g
Fat 16g
Cholesterol 55mg
Sodium 590mg
Saturated Fat 8g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1239-turkey-and-hashbrown-brunch-lasagna

Baked Salmon w/ Roasted Asparagus

August 25, 2019 at 6:31 PM | Posted in salmon, seafood | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Salmon w/ Roasted Asparagus

 

 

 

For Breakfast this morning I prepared some Skillet Potatoes and Ham for Breakfast. I used 1 package of Simply Potatoes Steakhouse Seasoned Diced Potatoes and a package of Meijer Diced Ham to prepare it. Just cook the Potatoes according to the package instructions and with about 5 minutes of cooking time left add the Diced Ham. I topped it with a sprinkle of Sargento Reduced Fat Cheddar/Jack Cheese. Just love this skillet meal! 83 degrees and partly cloudy out, no humidity! Did a load of laundry after Breakfast and then ran the vacuum. After Lunch I got the cart out and raked the front yard again. Then got the leaf blower out and cleaned off the deck and driveway areas. For Dinner tonight I prepared a Baked Salmon w/ Roasted Asparagus.

I purchased a package of North Atlantic Salmon from Meijer the day before and had it in fridge. To make it I’ll need the Salmon, McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Peppercorn Medley, Dried Parsley, Dried Chive, and Extra Light Olive Oil.

 

 

 

 

 

To prepare it; I preheated the oven on 400 degrees. I then got a small baking pan and sprayed it with Pam Cooking Spray. I washed the Fillet off in cold water and patted dry with a paper towel. Next I put a light coat of the Extra Light Olive Oil on the Fillet and then seasoned. Lined the Fillet in the pan and baked. I baked it for 8 minutes, and done. Excellent Salmon!

 

 

 

 

 

For a side I prepared Roasted Asparagus. I love pairing Asparagus with Potatoes! To prepare it I’ll need; 1 bunch of Asparagus, 1 Tablespoon of Crumbled Bacon or Bacon Bits, Ground Garlic Salt, Sea Salt, Freshly Ground Black Pepper, and 1 tbsp Extra Light Olive Oil. To prepare it is easy; Preheat the oven to 400F. Place the Asparagus in a baking tray sheet. Add the Bacon, Garlic Salt, Salt, Pepper, and Extra Light Olive Oil and toss to coat. Bake for 10 minutes. Remove from oven. Cool a couple of minutes and serve. Comes out tender and delicious. I like the como of Baked Salmon and Roasted Asparagus! For Dessert later a bowl of fresh sliced South Carolina Peaches.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Atlantic Salmon
The Atlantic salmon is a species of ray-finned fish in the family Salmonidae. It is found in the northern Atlantic Ocean, in rivers that flow into the north Atlantic and, due to human introduction, in the north Pacific Ocean.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_salmon

One of America’s Favorites – Mashed Potatoes

February 4, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Mashed Potato

Mashed potato (British English) or mashed potatoes (American English and Canadian English), colloquially known as mash, is a dish prepared by mashing boiled, peeled potatoes. Milk and butter are frequently used in preparation and it is frequently whipped at the end. The dish is usually a side dish to meat and/or vegetables. The closely related smashed potatoes dish is made with unskinned potatoes and it is hand mashed and not whipped.

Recipes for making the dish started appearing in 1747 with an entry in The Art of Cookery by Hannah Glasse. Dehydrated and frozen mashed potatoes are available in many supermarkets.

Mashed potato may be used as an intermediary ingredient for other dishes such as dumplings and gnocchi, in which case the potatoes may be baked or boiled, and may or may not have dairy or seasoning added.

The use of “floury” types of potatoes is recommended, although “waxy” potatoes are sometimes used for a different texture. There are a multitude of “floury” types, but the most commonly known include russet, golden wonder, and red rascal potatoes. Butter, vegetable oil, milk and/or cream are usually added to improve flavor and texture, and the potatoes are seasoned with salt, pepper, and any other desired herbs and spices. Popular ingredients and seasonings include: garlic, cheese, bacon bits, sour cream, crisp onion or spring onion, caramelised onion, mayonnaise, mustard, horseradish, spices such as nutmeg, and chopped herbs such as parsley.

One French variation adds egg yolk for pommes duchesse or Duchess potatoes; piped through a pastry tube into wavy ribbons and rosettes, brushed with butter and lightly browned. Pomme purée (potato puree) uses considerably more butter than normal mashed potato – up to one part butter for every two parts potato. In low-calorie or non-dairy variations, milk, cream and butter may be replaced by soup stock or broth. Aloo Bharta, an Indian sub-continent variation, uses chopped onions, mustard (oil, paste or seeds), chili pepper, coriander leaves and other spices.

Mashed potato served with Frankfurter Rippchen, sauerkraut and mustard

Mashed potato can be served as a side dish, and is often served with sausages in the British Isles, where they are known as bangers and mash. Mashed potato can be an ingredient of various other dishes, including shepherd’s and cottage pie, pierogi, colcannon, dumplings, potato pancakes, potato croquettes and gnocchi. Particularly runny mashed potatoes are called mousseline potatoes.

In the United Kingdom, the cold mashed potato is mixed with fresh eggs and then fried until crisp to produce the potato cake. This dish is thought to have originated in Cornwall and is a popular breakfast item. When instead combined with meat and other leftover vegetables, the fried dish is known as bubble and squeak.

A popular accompaniment to mashed potatoes in the United States is gravy. The most common forms of gravy paired with mashed potatoes are beef gravy or turkey gravy, though vegetable gravy is becoming more common as the vegetarian and vegan trends see a rise in popularity.

A potato masher is a utensil which can be used to prepare the potatoes, as is a potato ricer. They may also be whipped with an electric hand mixer, or with sufficient boiling, can be mashed effectively with a durable wooden spoon and brute force.

 

Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Turkey Bacon Cheese Balls

April 7, 2017 at 6:31 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is – Turkey Bacon Cheese Balls. The perfect Appetizer, Turkey Bacon Cheese Balls! Made with JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon along with Cream Cheese, Cheddar Cheese, Chives, Pecans, and Spices. You can find this recipe along with all the other delicious and healthy recipes at the Jennie – O website. Enjoy and Make the Switch! https://www.jennieo.com/

 

 

Turkey Bacon Cheese Balls

This indulgent little appetizer features cream cheese, Cheddar cheese, and crowd-pleasing bacon all rolled up into one amazing bite. One of our many appetizers that’s ready in just 35 minutes.

INGREDIENTS

8 slices JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon
12 ounces cream cheese, softened
1 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese
¼ cup chopped fresh chives, divided
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
½ teaspoon garlic salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 cup finely chopped toasted pecans
serve with crackers, if desired
DIRECTIONS

1) Cook turkey bacon as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer. Finely chop; set aside.
2) Stir in paprika, garlic salt and pepper.
3) Shape into 1-inch balls. Refrigerate 15 minutes
4) In small bowl, combine pecans and remaining 1 tablespoon chives.
5) Roll balls in pecan mixture, pressing to coat. Refrigerate until ready to serve.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING
Calories230
Protein13g
Carbohydrates6g
Fiber1g
Sugars3g
Fat17g
Cholesterol30mg
Sodium570mg
Saturated Fat4.5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1113-turkey-bacon-cheese-balls

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

April 30, 2015 at 5:07 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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If you’re using Chives….

 
If you are not growing your own, fresh chives are readily available fresh in most markets year-round. Choose fresh, uniform-sized, evenly green leaves with no signs of wilting, yellowing, or drying. In a pinch, chopped scallion greens may be used as a substitute, but the onion flavor will be more pronounced.

One of America’s Favorites – the Baked Potato

October 13, 2014 at 5:32 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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A baked potato with butter

A baked potato with butter

A baked potato, or jacket potato, is the edible result of baking a potato. When well cooked, a baked potato has a fluffy interior and a crisp skin. It may be served with fillings and condiments such as butter, cheese or ham. Potatoes can be baked in a conventional gas or electric oven, a convection oven, a microwave oven, on a barbecue grill, or on/in an open fire. Some restaurants use special ovens designed specifically to cook large numbers of potatoes, then keep them warm and ready for service.

 

 

Prior to cooking, the potato should be scrubbed clean, washed and dried with eyes and surface blemishes removed, and possibly basted with oil or butter and/or salt. Pricking the potato with a fork or knife allows steam to escape during the cooking process. Potatoes cooked in a microwave oven without pricking the skin might split open due to built up internal pressure from unvented steam. It takes between one and two hours to bake a large potato in a conventional oven at 200 °C (392 °F). Microwaving takes from six to twelve minutes depending on oven power and potato size, but does not generally produce a crisp skin.

Some varieties of potato such as Russet and King Edward potatoes are more suitable for baking than others, owing to their size and consistency.

Wrapping the potato in aluminium foil before cooking in a standard oven will help to retain moisture, while leaving it unwrapped will result in a crisp skin. When cooking over an open fire or in the coals of a barbecue, it may require wrapping in foil to prevent burning of the skin. A potato buried directly in coals of a fire cooks very nicely, with a mostly burned and inedible skin. A baked potato is fully cooked when its internal temperature reaches 99 °C (210 °F).

Once a potato has been baked, some people discard the skin and eat only the softer and moister interior, while others enjoy the taste and texture of the crisp skin. Potatoes baked in their skins may lose between 20 to 40% of their vitamin C content because heating in air is slow and vitamin inactivation can continue for a long time. Small potatoes bake more quickly than large ones and therefore retain more of their vitamin C. Despite the popular misconception that potatoes are fattening, baked potatoes can be used as part of a healthy diet.
Some people bake their potatoes and then scoop out the interior, leaving the skin as a shell. The white interior flesh can then be mixed with various other food items such as cheese, butter, or bacon bits. This mixture is then spooned back into the skin shells and they are replaced in the oven to warm through. In America these are known variously as loaded potato skins, filled potatoes and twice baked potatoes. In Great Britain, toppings or fillings tend to be more varied than they are in America: baked beans, curried chicken, tuna, and prawn fillings are popular, and in Scotland even haggis is used as a filling for jacket potatoes.

 

 

Baked potato and sweet potato, with kale

Baked potato and sweet potato, with kale

Many restaurants serve baked potatoes with sides (US English) such as butter, sour cream, chives, shredded cheese, and bacon bits. These potatoes can be a side item to a steak dinner, or some similar entree. Sides are usually optional and customers can order as many or as few as they wish.

Large, stuffed baked potatoes may be served as an entree, usually filled with meat in addition to any of the ingredients mentioned above. Barbecued or smoked meat or chili is substituted. Vegetables such as broccoli may also be added.

A variety are Hasselback potatoes, where the potato is cut into very thin slices almost down the bottom, so that the potato still holds together, and is then baked in the oven, often scalloped with cheese. The proper noun “Hasselback” refers to the fancy Hasselbacken hotel and restaurant in Stockholm which originated this dish.

 
Idaho is the major producing state of potatoes. The Idaho baked potato was heavily promoted by the Northern Pacific Railroad in the early 20th century, often using Hollywood movie stars.

Hazen Titus was appointed as the Northern Pacific Railway’s dining car superintendent in 1908. He talked to Yakima Valley farmers who complained that they were unable to sell their potato crops because their potatoes were simply too large. They fed them to hogs. Titus learned that a single potato could weigh from two to five pounds, but that smaller potatoes were preferred by the end buyers of the vegetable and that many considered them not to be edible because they were difficult to cook because of their thick, rough skin.

Titus and his staff discovered the “inedible” potatoes were delicious after baking in a slow oven. He contracted to purchase as many potatoes as the farmers could produce that were more than two pounds in weight. Soon after the first delivery of “Netted Gem Bakers”, they were offered to diners on the North Coast Limited beginning in 1909. Word of the line’s specialty offering traveled quickly, and before long it was using “the Great Big Baked Potato” as a slogan to promote the railroad’s passenger service. When an addition was built for the Northern Pacific’s Seattle commissary in 1914, reporter wrote, “A large trade mark, in the shape of a baked potato, 40 ft.long and 18 ft. in diameter, surmounts the roof. The potato is electric lighted and its eyes, through the electric mechanism, are made to wink constantly. A cube of butter thrust into its split top glows intermittently.” Premiums such as postcards, letter openers, and spoons were also produced to promote “The Route of the Great Big Baked Potato”; the slogan served the Northern Pacific for about 50 years. The song “Great Big Baked Potato” (words by N.R. Streeter and H. Caldwell ; Music by Oliver George) was written about this potato.

 
A baked potato is sometimes called a jacket potato in the United Kingdom. The baked potato has been popular in the UK for many years. In the mid-19th century, jacket potatoes were sold on the streets by hawkers during the autumn and winter months. In London, it was estimated that some 10 tons of baked potatoes were sold each day by this method. Common jacket potato fillings (or “toppings”) in the United Kingdom include cheese and beans, tuna mayonnaise, chili con carne and chicken and bacon.

Baked potatoes are often eaten on Guy Fawkes Night; traditionally they were often baked in the glowing embers of a bonfire.

As part of the upsurge for more healthy fast food, the baked potato has again taken to the streets of the UK both in mobile units and restaurants. The fast-food chain Spudulike specialises in baked potatoes.

 

Herb and Spice of the Week – Chives

August 14, 2014 at 5:20 AM | Posted in Herb and Spice of the Week | Leave a comment
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Chives Allium schoenoprasum

Chives Allium schoenoprasum

Chives is the common name of Allium schoenoprasum, the smallest species of the edible onion genus. A perennial plant, it is native to Europe, Asia and North America. A. schoenoprasum is the only species of Allium native to both the New and the Old Worlds.

The name of the species derives from the Greek skhoínos (sedge) and práson (leek). Its English name, chives, derives from the French word cive, from cepa, the Latin word for onion.

 

 

Chives are a commonly used herb and can be found in grocery stores or grown in home gardens. In culinary use, the scapes and the unopened, immature flower buds are diced and used as an ingredient for fish, potatoes, soups, and other dishes. Chives have insect-repelling properties that can be used in gardens to control pests.
Chives are grown for their scapes, which are used for culinary purposes as a flavoring herb, and provide a somewhat milder flavor than those of other Allium species.

 

 

Chives have a wide variety of culinary uses, such as in traditional dishes in France and Sweden, among others. In his 1806 book Attempt at a Flora (Försök til en flora), Retzius describes how chives are used with pancakes, soups, fish and sandwiches. They are also an ingredient of the gräddfil sauce served with the traditional herring dish served at Swedish midsummer celebrations. The flowers may also be used to garnish dishes. In Poland, chives are served with quark cheese.

Chives are one of the “fines herbes” of French cuisine, which also include tarragon, chervil and/or parsley.

Chives can be found fresh at most markets year-round, making them readily available; they can also be dry-frozen without much impairment to the taste, giving home growers the opportunity to store large quantities harvested from their own gardens.

 
Retzius also describes how farmers would plant chives between the rocks making up the borders of their flowerbeds, to keep the plants free from pests (such as Japanese beetles). The growing plant repels unwanted insect life, and the juice of the leaves can be used for the same purpose, as well as fighting fungal infections, mildew and scab.

Its flowers are attractive to bees, which are important for gardens with an abundance of plants in need of pollination.

The medicinal properties of chives are similar to those of garlic, but weaker; the faint effects in comparison with garlic are probably the main reason for their limited use as a medicinal herb. Containing numerous organosulfur compounds such as allyl sulfides and alkyl sulfoxides, chives are reported to have a beneficial effect on the circulatory system. They also have mild stimulant, diuretic, and antiseptic properties. As chives are usually served in small amounts and never as the main dish, negative effects are rarely encountered, although digestive problems may occur following overconsumption.

 

 

Chives are also rich in vitamins A and C, contain trace amounts of sulfur, and are rich in calcium and iron.

 

A clump of flowering chives

A clump of flowering chives

Chives are cultivated both for their culinary uses and their ornamental value; the violet flowers are often used in ornamental dry bouquets.

Chives thrive in well-drained soil, rich in organic matter, with a pH of 6-7 and full sun. They can be grown from seed and mature in summer, or early the following spring. Typically, chives need to be germinated at a temperature of 15 to 20°C (60-70°F) and kept moist. They can also be planted under a cloche or germinated indoors in cooler climates, then planted out later. After at least four weeks, the young shoots should be ready to be planted out. They are also easily propagated by division.

In cold regions, chives die back to the underground bulbs in winter, with the new leaves appearing in early spring. Chives starting to look old can be cut back to about 2–5 cm. When harvesting, the needed number of stalks should be cut to the base. During the growing season, the plant will continually regrow leaves, allowing for a continuous harvest.

 
Chives have been cultivated in Europe since the Middle Ages (5th until the 15th centuries), although their usage dates back 5000 years. They were sometimes referred to as “rush leeks” (from the Greek schoinos meaning rush and prason meaning leek).

The Romans believed chives could relieve the pain from sunburn or a sore throat. They believed eating chives could increase blood pressure and act as a diuretic.

Romanian Gypsies have used chives in fortune telling. It was believed that bunches of dried chives hung around a house would ward off disease and evil.

 

Chili Spud and Grilled Cheese

June 4, 2014 at 5:27 PM | Posted in cheese, potatoes, Sargento's Cheese | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Chili Spud and Grilled Cheese

 

 

 

Chili Spud and Grilled Cheese 002
It’s been pouring the rain since last night. Already Flood Warnings out for different areas around here. Not quite as humid out though. Just did some work on the computer, scans and deleting some old files and such. For dinner something a bit different, a Chili Spud and Grilled Cheese. A hearty but easily prepared meal.

 

 

 
For my Chili Spud I used a medium size Russet Potato with toppings and seasoning of; McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn, Dried Parsley, Chives, Hormel Turkey Chili with Beans, and Sargento Reduced Fat Shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese. I started by adding the Chili to a small sauce pan and heating on medium until it was completely heated. To prepare the Potato, I gave it a good wash and scrub and poked about a dozen holes in it all around the Potato. Then I microwaved it for 3 minutes and 15 seconds. With the Potato done I split it in the middle and seasoned it withe McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. Topped it with Turkey Chili, sprinkled it with the Parsley and Chives, and topped it all with the Shredded Cheese! Now this one Awesome Potato!

 

 

 
Then for my Grilled Cheese I used Klosterman Wheat Bread and Sargento Ultra Thin Sharp Cheddar. I added a couple of pats of I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter to a flat grill pan. As that melted took two slices of Klosterman Bread, added my Cheese between the slices and grilled it on the pan. Flipped over once and frying until both sides were golden brown and the Cheese was melted.Grilled Cheese is still and always will be one of the Classic Comfort Foods! Chili Spud and Grilled Cheese, very good dinner! For dessert later a Healthy Choice Dark Fudge Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sargento® Ultra Thin Sliced Sharp Cheddar CheeseSargento Ultra Thin Sharp Cheddar Cheese

Once you try Sargento Ultra Thin slices, you’ll see why they were given the Nielsen Breakthrough Award, naming them a top innovative food product in 2014.
Our delicious and perfectly aged Sharp Cheddar, sliced ultra thin to add just the right amount of bold flavor to your favorite cold cut sandwiches, warm Panini or veggie wraps.
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1Slice (11g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 45 From Fat 30
% Daily Value
Total Fat 3.5g 5%
Saturated Fat 2g10%
Trans Fat
Cholesterol 10mg 4%
Sodium 70mg 3%
Total Carbohydrate %
Dietary Fiber 0g0%
Sugars
Protein 3g

 
http://www.sargento.com/products/224/sargento-ultra-thin-sliced-sharp-cheddar-cheese/

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