Skinny “Starch”: Healthy Cauliflower Recipes

July 3, 2016 at 4:58 AM | Posted in diabetes, diabetes friendly, Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website its Skinny “Starch”: Healthy Cauliflower Recipes. I love Cauliflower, and this one is packed with delicious and healthy Cauliflower recipes! Recipes including; Mediterranean Cauliflower Pizza, Cauliflower Steaks with Chimichurri, and Roasted Cauliflower with Caper-Anchovy Vinaigrette. You can find all of them at the EatingWell website, Eat Healthy! http://www.eatingwell.com/

 

 

Skinny “Starch”: Healthy Cauliflower RecipesEatingWell2
Enjoy these low-calorie cauliflower recipes for sides, salads and main dishes.
If you’re watching what you eat, you may be trying to eat fewer starches. Cauliflower can mimic potatoes, but has 84 percent less carbs and 79 percent fewer calories per 1/2 cup. Our low-calorie cauliflower recipes are a diet-friendly way to enjoy creamy soups, potato-style dishes and even pizza crust. Try these skinny cauliflower recipes, including Creamy Mashed Cauliflower, Balsamic & Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower, Mediterranean Cauliflower Pizza and more.

 

 

Mediterranean Cauliflower Pizza
In this healthy, gluten-free cauliflower “pizza” recipe, shredded cauliflower is mixed with mozzarella and oregano to make a flourless crust that echoes the flavor of a traditional pizza pie. The Meyer lemon, olive and sun-dried tomato topping adds a sophisticated Mediterranean flavor, but feel free to try more traditional pizza toppings, such as marinara sauce and mushrooms—even pepperoni…….

 
Cauliflower Steaks with Chimichurri
In this stunning, healthy cauliflower recipe, a head of cauliflower is cut into thick slabs then roasted until caramelized and served with chimichurri, a garlic-herb sauce. The cauliflower steaks make a fine accompaniment to actual steaks, or better still, serve them on their own as a vegetarian alternative to steak. Each head of cauliflower will provide 2 to 3 steaks from the center—the sides tend to crumble. For a truly show-stopping presentation, use the center portion of 2 heads and save the rest of the cauliflower for another recipe that calls for cauliflower florets……

 
Roasted Cauliflower with Caper-Anchovy Vinaigrette
In this impressive whole roasted cauliflower recipe, the cauliflower is poached in a seasoned broth before being roasted in a super-hot oven. Serve as a first course or offer the roasted cauliflower as the centerpiece of a multi-dish buffet……

 

 

* Click the link below to get all the Skinny “Starch”: Healthy Cauliflower Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/skinny_starch_healthy_cauliflower_recipes

Condiment of the Week – Chimichurri

December 31, 2015 at 5:55 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | Leave a comment
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Chimichurri

Chimichurri

Chimichurri (Spanish pronunciation: [tʃimiˈtʃuri]) or chimmichurri is a green sauce used for grilled meat, originally from the Rio de la Plata, Argentina. It is made of finely chopped parsley, minced garlic, olive oil, oregano, and white vinegar. In Uruguay, the dominant flavoring is parsley, garlic, red pepper flakes, and fresh oregano.

 
The origin of the name of the sauce is unclear. There are various stories explaining the name as a corruption of English words, most commonly the name ‘Jimmy Curry’ or ‘Jimmy McCurry’. But there is no contemporary documentation of any of these stories.

 

Another theory for the name of the sauce comes from the Basque settlers that arrived in Argentina as early as the 19th century. According to this theory, the name of the sauce comes from the Basque term tximitxurri, loosely translated as “a mixture of several things in no particular order”.

 
Chimichurri is made from finely chopped parsley, minced garlic, olive oil, oregano, Red Chili Flakes, and white or red wine vinegar. Additional flavorings such as paprika, cumin, thyme, lemon, basil, cilantro (coriander leaf) and bay leaf may be included. In its red version, tomato and red bell pepper may also be added. It can also be used as a marinade for grilled meat. Chimichurri is available bottled or dehydrated for preparation by mixing with oil and water. Variants may replace the parsley with herbs such as coriander (cilantro) and culantro.

 

Condiment of the Week – Barbecue Sauce

December 17, 2015 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Condiment of the Week | 3 Comments
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The St. Louis barbecue style

The St. Louis barbecue style

Barbecue sauce (also abbreviated BBQ sauce) is a flavoring sauce used as a marinade, basting or topping for meat cooked in the barbecue cooking style, including pork or beef ribs and chicken. It is an ubiquitous condiment and is used on many other foods as well.

The ingredients vary widely even within individual countries, but most include some variation on vinegar and/or tomato paste as a base, as well as liquid smoke, spices such as mustard and black pepper, and sweeteners such as sugar or molasses.

 
Some place the origin of barbecue sauce at the formation of the first American colonies in the 17th century. References to the substance start occurring in both English and French literature over the next two hundred years. South Carolina mustard sauce, a type of barbecue sauce, can be traced to German settlers in the 18th century.

Early cookbooks did not tend to include recipes for barbecue sauce. The first commercially produced barbecue sauce was made by the Georgia Barbecue Sauce Company in Atlanta, Georgia. Its sauce was advertised for sale in the Atlanta Constitution, January 31, 1909. Heinz released its barbecue sauce in 1940. Kraft Foods also started making cooking oils with bags of spice attached, supplying another market entrance of barbecue sauce.

 
Different geographical regions have allegiances to their particular styles and variations for barbecue sauce. For example, vinegar and mustard-based barbecue sauces are popular in certain areas of the southern United States, while in the northern U.S. tomato-based barbecue sauces are well-known. In Asian countries a ketchup and corn syrup-based sauce is common. Mexican salsa can also be used as a base for barbecue sauces.

Chimichurri

Chimichurri

South America
The sauce for asado, similar to barbecue in Argentina and Uruguay, is called chimichurri – a parsley based green sauce used as a condiment on the table, a marinade, and a grilling sauce. Chimichurri is used on beef, lamb, pork, goat, fowl, venison and root vegetables. Chilean pebre, which is based on chopped tomato and contains onion, parsley or coriander and sometimes chilli, can be used in a similar manner, or served as an accompaniment to asado; sauces in the Andean countries of Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador tend to be more piquant.

In Brazil, the typical barbecue sauce is called vinaigrette (made with vinegar, olive oil, tomatoes, parsley and onions).
Australia
In Australia, “barbecue sauce” principally refers to a condiment in the same regard as ketchup. Typically it is a caramelized tomato-based sauce, dark brown in color, replicating the smoky flavors of barbecue grilling. Australian barbecue sauce made at home is sometimes simply a blend of tomato sauce and Worcestershire sauce. Commercially, the various brands in the market range from a fruity flavor to a sauce similar to brown sauce.
United States

Hunt's barbecue sauce

Hunt’s barbecue sauce

The U.S. has a wide variety of differing barbecue sauce tastes. Some are based in regional tradition.

* East Carolina Sauce – Most American barbecue sauces can trace their roots to the two sauces common in North Carolina. The simplest and the earliest were supposedly popularized by African slaves who also advanced the development of American barbecue. They were made with vinegar, ground black pepper, and hot chili pepper flakes. It is used as a “mopping” sauce to baste the meat while it was cooking and as a dipping sauce when it is served. Thin and sharp, it penetrates the meat and cuts the fats in the mouth. There is little or no sugar in this sauce.
* Lexington Dip (a.k.a. Western Carolina Dip or Piedmont Dip) – In Lexington and in the “Piedmont” hilly areas of western North Carolina, the sauce is often called a dip. It is a lot like the East Carolina Sauce (above) with tomato paste, tomato sauce, or ketchup added.
* Kansas City – Thick, reddish-brown, tomato or ketchup-based with sugars, vinegar, and spices. Evolved from the Lexington Dip (above), it is significantly different in that it is thick and sweet and does not penetrate the meat as much as sit on the surface. This is the most common and popular sauce in the US and all other tomato based sauces are variations on the theme using more or less of the main ingredients.
* Memphis – Similar to the Kansas City style, typically having the same ingredients, but tending to have a larger percentage of vinegar and use molasses as a sweetener.
* Florida – Similar to the Memphis style because it has a higher percentage of vinegar than Kansas City style. Florida style is characterized by the tropical fruit flavors such as orange, mango, guava, papaya, pineapple, and tamarind as well as peppers with some heat such as chipotle and habanero. Because of its fruity flavor it is commonly served with pork, chicken and seafood.
* South Carolina Mustard Sauce – Part of South Carolina is known for its yellow barbecue sauces made primarily of yellow mustard, vinegar, sugar and spices. This sauce is most common in a belt from Columbia to Charleston, an area settled by many Germans. Vinegar-based sauces with black pepper are common in the coastal plains region as in North Carolina, and thin tomato- and vinegar-based sauces are common in the hilly regions as in North Carolina.
* Texas – In some of the older, more traditional restaurants the sauces are heavily seasoned with cumin, chili peppers, bell peppers, chili powder or ancho powder, lots of black pepper, fresh onion, only a touch of tomato, little or no sugar, and they often contain meat drippings and smoke flavor because meats are dipped into them. They are medium thick and often resemble a thin tomato soup. They penetrate the meat easily rather than sit on top. Bottled barbecue sauces from Texas are often different from those used in the same restaurants because they do not contain meat drippings.
* Alabama White Sauce – North Alabama is known for its distinctive white sauce, a mayonnaise-based sauce, which is used predominantly on chicken and pork. It is composed of mayonnaise, vinegar, sugar, salt and black pepper.

 
Asia
* Hoisin sauce, a type of Chinese-style barbecue sauce, serves as a base ingredient in many other recipes for Chinese barbecue sauces
* A spicy, yogurt-based barbecue sauce is used for tandoori chicken, an Indian dish
* A sweet soy sauce marinade (tare in Japanese; “teriyaki sauce” in the west) is used for teriyaki, a Japanese-style grill (traditionally fish), before and during the grilling process.
* For Korean Galbi, a ganjang-based sauce is used, often referred to as Galbi or Kalbi sauce. It is used as a marinade. The sauce is generally made from soy sauce, garlic, and sugar, though variations with sesame oil, rice wine, hot pepper paste, fruit juice, lemon-lime soda and honey are common.

 

Skinny “Starch”: Healthy Cauliflower Recipes

October 8, 2015 at 4:55 AM | Posted in Eating Well | 1 Comment
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Here’s some delicious Skinny “Starch”: Healthy Cauliflower Recipes. It’s all from the EatingWell website, which has countless healthy recipes and tips. http://www.eatingwell.com/

 
Skinny “Starch”: Healthy Cauliflower RecipesEatingWell2

Enjoy these low-calorie cauliflower recipes for sides, salads and main dishes.
If you’re watching what you eat, you may be trying to eat fewer starches. Cauliflower can mimic potatoes, but has 84 percent less carbs and 79 percent fewer calories per 1/2 cup. Our low-calorie cauliflower recipes are a diet-friendly way to enjoy creamy soups, potato-style dishes and even pizza crust. Try these skinny cauliflower recipes, including Creamy Mashed Cauliflower, Balsamic & Parmesan Roasted Cauliflower, Mediterranean Cauliflower Pizza and more.

 

 

Mediterranean Cauliflower Pizza
In this healthy, gluten-free cauliflower “pizza” recipe, shredded cauliflower is mixed with mozzarella and oregano to make a flourless crust that echoes the flavor of a traditional pizza pie. The Meyer lemon, olive and sun-dried tomato topping adds a sophisticated Mediterranean flavor, but feel free to try more traditional pizza toppings, such as marinara sauce and mushrooms—even pepperoni…….

 
Cauliflower Steaks with Chimichurri
In this stunning, healthy cauliflower recipe, a head of cauliflower is cut into thick slabs then roasted until caramelized and served with chimichurri, a garlic-herb sauce. The cauliflower steaks make a fine accompaniment to actual steaks, or better still, serve them on their own as a vegetarian alternative to steak. Each head of cauliflower will provide 2 to 3 steaks from the center—the sides tend to crumble. For a truly show-stopping presentation, use the center portion of 2 heads and save the rest of the cauliflower for another recipe that calls for cauliflower florets……

 
Roasted Cauliflower with Caper-Anchovy Vinaigrette
In this impressive whole roasted cauliflower recipe, the cauliflower is poached in a seasoned broth before being roasted in a super-hot oven. Serve as a first course or offer the roasted cauliflower as the centerpiece of a multi-dish buffet……

 

* Click the link below to get all the Skinny “Starch”: Healthy Cauliflower Recipes

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/skinny_starch_healthy_cauliflower_recipes

One of America’s Favorites – Chimichanga

December 22, 2014 at 6:31 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | 2 Comments
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A chimichanga with rice

A chimichanga with rice

 

Chimichanga (/tʃɪmiˈtʃæŋɡə/; Spanish: [tʃimiˈtʃaŋɡa]) is a deep-fried burrito that is popular in Southwestern U.S. cuisine and the Mexican states of Sinaloa and Sonora. The dish is typically prepared by filling a flour tortilla with a wide range of ingredients, most commonly rice, cheese, machaca, carne adobada, or shredded chicken, and folding it into a rectangular package. It is then deep-fried and can be accompanied with salsa, guacamole, sour cream, and/or cheese.

 

 

 

 

Debate over the origins of the chimichanga is ongoing:

According to one source, the founder of the Tucson, Arizona, restaurant “El Charro”, Monica Flin, accidentally dropped a pastry into the deep fat fryer in 1922. She immediately began to utter a Spanish curse-word beginning “chi…” (chingada), but quickly stopped herself and instead exclaimed chimichanga, a Spanish equivalent of “thingamajig”.

Woody Johnson, founder of Macayo’s Mexican Kitchen, claims he invented the chimichanga in 1946 when he put some burritos into a deep fryer as an experiment at his original restaurant Woody’s El Nido. These “fried burritos” became so popular that by 1952, when Woody’s El Nido became Macayo’s, the chimichanga was one of the restaurant’s main menu items. Johnson opened Macayo’s in 1952.

Although no official records indicate when the dish first appeared, retired University of Arizona folklorist Jim Griffith recalls seeing chimichangas at the Yaqui Old Pascua Village in Tucson in the mid-1950s.

Given the variant chivichanga, mainly employed in Mexico, another derivation would have it that immigrants to the United States brought the dish with them, mainly through Nogales into Arizona. A third, and perhaps most likely possibility, is that the chimichanga, or chivichanga, has long been a part of local cuisine of the Pimería Alta of Arizona and Sonora, with its early range extending southward into Sinaloa. In Sinaloa the chimichangas are small.

Knowledge and appreciation of the dish spread slowly outward from the Tucson area, with popularity elsewhere accelerating in recent decades. Though the chimichanga is now found as part of the Tex-Mex repertoire, its roots within the U.S. seem to be in Pima County, Arizona.

 

A chimichanga with refried beans and rice

A chimichanga with refried beans and rice

 

According to data presented by the United States Department of Agriculture, a typical 183 grams (6.5 ounces) serving of a beef and cheese chimichanga contains 443 calories, 20 grams protein, 39 grams carbohydrates, 23 grams total fat, ll grams saturated fat, 51 milligrams cholesterol, and 957 milligrams of sodium.

 

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