Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – BUFFALO TORTILLA SOUP

September 15, 2021 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is – BUFFALO TORTILLA SOUP. Made using one of my favorites, the Wild Idea PULLED BUFFALO CHUCK ROAST. This is so delicious! Seasoned just right and it just melts in your mouth. So it’s a Tortilla Soup with a twist. Below is the full recipe and also a link to purchase the PULLED BUFFALO CHUCK ROAST. You can find this recipe and purchase any of the Wild Idea Buffalo Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

BUFFALO TORTILLA SOUP
This traditional Mexican soup takes on a whole new “el yumo” taste with our easy to use, heat and eat Pulled Buffalo Chuck Roast. My recipe is simple, but I promise it will not disappoint! I do have one warning though, when making the tortilla strips, be sure to have celery sticks close at hand to try to keep you from eating all of the hot, limed & salted crispy strips! No guarantee’s on that though. *Recipe can easily be halved.

Ingredients:
2 – 1 pound, Heat & Eat Wild Idea Buffalo Pulled Chuck Roast
½ – cup coconut oil, or other oil
10 – corn tortillas, 4 – cut into strips & 6 – quartered
2 – onions, coarse chopped
8 – whole garlic cloves, peeled
2 – whole dried pasilla chiles, de-stemmed, seeded, and coarse chopped
1 – tablespoon cumin
1 – teaspoon coriander
1 – teaspoon cardamom
1 – teaspoon salt
1 – quart tomatoes (blackened, or canned)
2 – quarts organic chicken broth
1 – lime, halved

Toppings:
1 to 2 – avocado, peeled, seeded, and chopped
4 – ounces Queso Chihuahua, shredded
½ – cup cilantro, chopped
1 – lime, cut into wedges

Preparation:

1 – In a medium saucepan, heat oil over medium high heat.
2 – Add ¼ of the tortillas strips and fry until crispy, about 3 minutes. Remove from oil and place on a brown bag, sprinkle with salt and a squeeze of lime. Repeat until all of the strips are cooked.
3 – Transfer 1 tablespoon of the oil used to fry tortillas into a soup pot, over medium high heat.
4 – Add the onions, garlic, chilies, and seasonings to the pot. Allow vegetables to lightly brown, stirring occasionally.
5 – Add the tomatoes, broth, and remaining 6 tortillas and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook for about one hour.
6 – Remove from heat and let set for half an hour.
7 – Transfer the soup to a blender in batches and mix until smooth. Return soup to medium high heat and bring to a gentle boil.
8 – Add the two packages of the Pulled Buffalo Chuck Roast and and stir to incorporate. Heat for 5 minutes, then stir in the juice of half of a fresh lime and season to taste.
9 – To serve, ladle soup into bowls, top with crispy tortillas strips, avocado, grated cheese, and fresh cilantro. Accompany with fresh lime wedges.
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/99164161-buffalo-tortilla-soup

 

 

WILD IDEA PULLED BUFFALO CHUCK ROAST 1 LB.
We rub our Pulled Buffalo Chuck Roast with our very own Wild Idea blend of Mexican seasonings and then slowly braise the meat until it’s fall apart tender. We have done all the work for you, so all you need to do is “heat and eat!” Use Wild Idea Pulled Buffalo Chuck Roast in all of your favorite Mexican dishes like tacos, enchiladas, and quesadillas. Or you can add your favorite barbecue sauce for great tasting B.B.Q. sandwiches!

1 lb. package.

Ingredients: 100% Grass-fed Buffalo, Organic: Apple Cider, Lime Juice, Onion Powder, Cumin, Sea Salt, Black Pepper, Chili Powder, Paprika, Garlic Powder, Oregano, Cayenne Pepper
https://wildideabuffalo.com/collections/ranch-kitchen/products/pulled-buffalo-chuck-roast

Healthy Scallion Onion Recipes

May 30, 2021 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell Website and Magazine it’s Healthy Scallion Onion Recipes. Find some Delicious and Healthy Scallion Onion Recipes with recipes including Crock-Pot Pineapple Chicken, Skillet Green Chile-Chicken Enchilada Casserole, and Easy Loaded Baked Omelet Muffins. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2021! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Scallion Onion Recipes
Find healthy, delicious red onion recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Crock-Pot Pineapple Chicken
This slow-cooker chicken with pineapple has a hint of ginger and sesame and is made with simple ingredients you may already have in your pantry! Look for fresh pineapple that’s been peeled and cored already to make assembly even easier. Serve with brown rice to sop up the sweet and savory sauce……………..

Skillet Green Chile-Chicken Enchilada Casserole
This 45-minute enchilada recipe is bursting with chicken, tomatoes, tomatillos, chile peppers, and cheese, and because it’s a one-skillet casserole, cleanup is a breeze…………

Easy Loaded Baked Omelet Muffins
Protein-packed omelet muffins, or baked mini omelets, are a perfect breakfast for busy mornings. Make a batch ahead and freeze for the days when you don’t have time for your typical bowl of oatmeal. You can also serve these fresh with fruit salad for a simple weekend brunch…………….

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Scallion Onion Recipes
https://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/21675/ingredients/vegetables/onions/scallion/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

December 19, 2020 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | Leave a comment
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Chili to lose weight……………

I bet you didn’t know this, but a big bowl of chili can help you lose weight. Yes, you read that right. The capsicum found in the chilies and the peppers used to season your chili will raise your body’s metabolic rate thereby raising heat production. Even sweet red peppers can do this. I’m going on a Chili Diet!

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – TEXAS RED CHILI

November 18, 2020 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is – TEXAS RED CHILI. It’s time again for some Texas Red Chili! Made using Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast, mild and medium hot chilies, onions, garlic, spices, and to heat up a bit more cayenne pepper. You can find this recipe and purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wide Idea Buffalo website. So Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

TEXAS RED CHILI
For all of you non-bean chili lovers, this recipe is for you! In addition to the instructions below, I would gather and prep all of the ingredients before starting the process, as I found I needed to stir frequently. To avoid getting the chili too hot, I used a combination of mild and medium hot chilies. You can adjust the heat to your liking with cayenne pepper. I stayed true to the San Antonio recipe, using lots of onions, garlic, spices, and Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast. The preparation was easy and I have to say the end result was pretty darn good! I hope you enjoy it too.

*A personal note on my introduction to Texas style chili can be found below recipe.

Ingredients:

1 – 3 lb. Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast, rinsed, patted dry and cut into 1/4” pieces

4 – tablespoons olive oil

4 – tablespoons butter

1/3 – cup masa/corn flour
2 – tablespoons Mexican oregano

2 – tablespoons cumin

2 – tablespoons Mexican chili powder

Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast

1 – tablespoon salt

1 – teaspoon black pepper

3 – Texas sweet onions, about 7 cups

6 – garlic cloves, diced, about 3 tablespoons

2 – cups organic beef broth

2 – cups water

4 – dried Ancho chilies, stems removed, seeded and coarse chopped

6 – dried medium red chilies, stems removed, seeded and coarse chopped

1 – fresh Serrano chili, stem removed, seeded and finely chopped

1 – tablespoon brown sugar
¼ – cup fresh squeezed lime juice

*optional ½ – teaspoon cayenne pepper

 

Preparation:

1 – Prep ingredients. Spread meat out onto a large baking sheet and sprinkle with the corn flour.

2 – In a large cast iron or heavy pot, over medium high heat, heat pan and add 2 tablespoons each of the butter and olive oil.

3 – Add half of the floured meat to the pan and allow to brown, stirring occasionally, scraping the bottom up to keep browning even. Remove browned meat from pan with a spoon and place on a plate. Repeat this step with the remaining butter, olive oil and meat.

4 – Add the first browned meat back to the pot, along with the seasonings, stirring to incorporate.

5 – Add chopped onions and garlic, again stirring occasionally, scraping up the bottom. Allow the onions and garlic to cook for about 7 minutes.

6 – Add the broth and water to the pot, stirring again as above.

7 – Reduce heat to simmer and cover the pot.

8 – Place all of the diced chilies in a food processor (small ones work best) and chop. After peppers are a bit more chopped, add ½ cup of the pot liquids to the processor and blend again, creating more of a paste.

9 – Add the pepper paste to the pot, stir to incorporate and cover. Allow the chili to simmer for a couple of hours, stirring as above occasionally.

10 – When the meat is tender, add the brown sugar and lime juice. Stir to incorporate, and allow to simmer a few more minutes.

11 – Taste, and adjust seasoning to your taste, adding the cayenne if more heat is needed.

*My introduction to “RED”: On a trip headed south for a little winter quail hunting, we made a stop in San Antonio, at the Pearl restaurant. Listed on the menu was a bowl of “Red”. The waiter proudly informed us that it was real authentic Texas Chili, that it was all meat with no beans, and that the chef had just perfected their recipe. We ordered a cup to share – it was delicious. I was curious about the history of this famous Texas dish, so I did a little research.

As the waiter stated, the recipes I found for Texas chili were bean-less and loaded with onions and chilies. I learned a few other interesting facts including, that the chili pepper was not native to this continent. A Spaniard named Don Juan de Onate first brought chili peppers into New Mexico in 1598. They soon after became a staple throughout the southwest. It was later on around 1723, when Canary Island transplants had settled in San Antonio that the meat dish first became known. It was a replication from their homeland, made with local peppers, onions, garlic, and spices. This became know as a bowl of “Red”. Red chili soon became a favorite of the cowboys on the trail, with the camp cook using beef or buffalo. And, according to Lyndon Baines Johnson, “Chili concocted outside of Texas is usually a weak, apologetic imitation of the real thing.” I’m not so sure about that….
https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/86324929-a-bowl-of-red-texas-style-chili

“Meatless Monday” Recipes of the Week – Healthy Vegetarian BBQ and Grilling Recipes

July 20, 2020 at 6:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well, Meatless Monday, Uncategorized | Leave a comment
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This week’s “Meatless Monday” Recipes of the Week are from the EatingWell website and Magazine – Healthy Vegetarian BBQ and Grilling Recipes. You’ll find recipes like Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille, Summer Vegetable Gnocchi Salad, and Ancho Chile Grilled Cauliflower Steaks. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Grilled Vegetable Ratatouille
This ratatouille dish is perfect for your bounty from the garden or farmers’ market. To keep the veggies from burning, watch them carefully while grilling. If necessary, move any that are cooking too quickly to a cooler spot on the grill………………………..

Summer Vegetable Gnocchi Salad
This riff on pasta salad is best served warm while the gnocchi are nice and tender. Plus, the grilled veggies taste extra-good fresh off the fire in this easy gnocchi recipe……………………..

Ancho Chile Grilled Cauliflower Steaks
Cauliflower’s round shape can be cut into slabs or florets for the grill. Here, it’s grilled both ways after being rubbed with a blend of spicy seasonings and basted with a fresh cilantro-lime vinaigrette……………………………

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Vegetarian BBQ and Grilling Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18562/lifestyle-diets/vegetarian/bbq-grilling-recipes/

Healthy Salsa Recipes

July 14, 2020 at 7:01 AM | Posted in Eating Well | Leave a comment
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From the EatingWell website and Magazine its Healthy Salsa Recipes. Complete or Kick Up any Dish with these Salsa Recipes with recipes including Peach-Mango Salsa, Green Tomato and Tomatillo and Lime Salsa Verde, and Roasted Three-Chile Salsa. Find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. You can also subscribe to one of my favorite Magazines, the EatingWell Magazine. So find these recipes and more all at the EatingWell website. Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2020! http://www.eatingwell.com/

Healthy Salsa Recipes
Find healthy, delicious salsa recipes, from the food and nutrition experts at EatingWell.

Peach-Mango Salsa
Scoop this easy and healthy peach-mango salsa up with tortilla chips, serve it with grilled chicken, salmon or pork chops, or use it as a taco topper. It’s a versatile and vibrant addition to all sorts of meals………………………………

Green Tomato, Tomatillo and Lime Salsa Verde
Packed with tomatillo and tart lime flavor, this salsa is a great way to try out (or use up) any green tomatoes you have lying around. A versatile salsa, it’s perfect for dipping with tortillas or adding to a grilled fish taco. You might even want to try stirring it into sour cream for an enchilada sauce. For less of a spicy kick, omit the jalapeños……………………..

Roasted Three-Chile Salsa
This hot salsa recipe is typically made in a large molcajete (lava-rock mortar and pestle), but this recipe calls for a food processor or blender to make it easier. If you have a molcajete, feel free to use it instead. If you can’t find the bright orange manzano chiles, sold at Mexican grocery stores, double the amount of jalapeño (or for a hotter salsa, double the habanero)………………………..

* Click the link below to get all the Healthy Salsa Recipes
http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes/18816/appetizer/dips-spreads/salsa/

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – TEXAS RED CHILI

December 11, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

This week’s Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week is – TEXAS RED CHILI. Made using Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast, mild and medium hot chilies, onions, garlic, spices, and to heat up a bit more cayenne pepper. You can find this recipe or purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast along with all the other Wild Idea Products at the Wild Idea Buffalo website. Just love the Fall and Winter Seasons, it just seems to elevate all the Chili, Soup, or Stew recipes to a different flavor level! Enjoy and Make 2019 a Healthy One! https://wildideabuffalo.com/

TEXAS RED CHILI
For all of you non-bean chili lovers, this recipe is for you! In addition to the instructions below, I would gather and prep all of the ingredients before starting the process, as I found I needed to stir frequently. To avoid getting the chili too hot, I used a combination of mild and medium hot chilies. You can adjust the heat to your liking with cayenne pepper. I stayed true to the San Antonio recipe, using lots of onions, garlic, spices, and Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast. The preparation was easy and I have to say the end result was pretty darn good! I hope you enjoy it too.

*A personal note on my introduction to Texas style chili can be found below recipe.

Ingredients:

1 – 3 lb. Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast, rinsed, patted dry and cut into 1/4” pieces

4 – tablespoons olive oil

4 – tablespoons butter

1/3 – cup masa/corn flour
2 – tablespoons Mexican oregano

2 – tablespoons cumin

2 – tablespoons Mexican chili powder

Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast

1 – tablespoon salt

1 – teaspoon black pepper

3 – Texas sweet onions, about 7 cups

6 – garlic cloves, diced, about 3 tablespoons

2 – cups organic beef broth

2 – cups water

4 – dried Ancho chilies, stems removed, seeded and coarse chopped

6 – dried medium red chilies, stems removed, seeded and coarse chopped

1 – fresh Serrano chili, stem removed, seeded and finely chopped

1 – tablespoon brown sugar
¼ – cup fresh squeezed lime juice

*optional ½ – teaspoon cayenne pepper

 

Preparation:

1 – Prep ingredients. Spread meat out onto a large baking sheet and sprinkle with the corn flour.

2 – In a large cast iron or heavy pot, over medium high heat, heat pan and add 2 tablespoons each of the butter and olive oil.

3 – Add half of the floured meat to the pan and allow to brown, stirring occasionally, scraping the bottom up to keep browning even. Remove browned meat from pan with a spoon and place on a plate. Repeat this step with the remaining butter, olive oil and meat.

4 – Add the first browned meat back to the pot, along with the seasonings, stirring to incorporate.

5 – Add chopped onions and garlic, again stirring occasionally, scraping up the bottom. Allow the onions and garlic to cook for about 7 minutes.

6 – Add the broth and water to the pot, stirring again as above.

7 – Reduce heat to simmer and cover the pot.

8 – Place all of the diced chilies in a food processor (small ones work best) and chop. After peppers are a bit more chopped, add ½ cup of the pot liquids to the processor and blend again, creating more of a paste.

9 – Add the pepper paste to the pot, stir to incorporate and cover. Allow the chili to simmer for a couple of hours, stirring as above occasionally.

10 – When the meat is tender, add the brown sugar and lime juice. Stir to incorporate, and allow to simmer a few more minutes.

11 – Taste, and adjust seasoning to your taste, adding the cayenne if more heat is needed.

*My introduction to “RED”: On a trip headed south for a little winter quail hunting, we made a stop in San Antonio, at the Pearl restaurant. Listed on the menu was a bowl of “Red”. The waiter proudly informed us that it was real authentic Texas Chili, that it was all meat with no beans, and that the chef had just perfected their recipe. We ordered a cup to share – it was delicious. I was curious about the history of this famous Texas dish, so I did a little research.

As the waiter stated, the recipes I found for Texas chili were bean-less and loaded with onions and chilies. I learned a few other interesting facts including, that the chili pepper was not native to this continent. A Spaniard named Don Juan de Onate first brought chili peppers into New Mexico in 1598. They soon after became a staple throughout the southwest. It was later on around 1723, when Canary Island transplants had settled in San Antonio that the meat dish first became known. It was a replication from their homeland, made with local peppers, onions, garlic, and spices. This became know as a bowl of “Red”. Red chili soon became a favorite of the cowboys on the trail, with the camp cook using beef or buffalo. And, according to Lyndon Baines Johnson, “Chili concocted outside of Texas is usually a weak, apologetic imitation of the real thing.” I’m not so sure about that….

https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/86324929-a-bowl-of-red-texas-style-chili

One of America’s Favorites – Tex-Mex Cuisine

September 2, 2019 at 6:02 AM | Posted in One of America's Favorites | Leave a comment
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Examples of modern Tex-Mex dishes and ingredients: corn, tortilla chips, cheese, tacos, salsa, chilies, and beef dishes

Tex-Mex cuisine (from Texan and Mexican), also known as Mexican American cuisine, is a fusion of Mexican and American cuisines, deriving from the culinary creations of the Tejano people living in Texas. It has spread from border states such as Texas and others in the Southwestern United States to the rest of the country as well as Canada. Tex-Mex is most popular in Texas and neighboring areas, especially nearby states in both the US and Mexico. The Mexican food market is a 41 billion dollar industry within the United States.

Tex-Mex is a subtype of Southwestern cuisine found in Arizona, California, Colorado, Louisiana, New Mexico, Nevada, Texas, Oklahoma, and Utah.

Some ingredients are common in Mexican cuisine, but other ingredients not typically used in Mexico are often added. Tex-Mex cuisine is characterized by its heavy use of shredded cheese, meat (particularly beef, pork and chicken), beans, peppers and spices, in addition to flour tortillas.

Generally cheese plays a much bigger role in Tex-Mex food than in mainstream Mexican cuisine, particularly in the popularity of Chile con queso (often referred to as simply “queso”) which is often eaten with chips (alongside or in place of guacamole and salsa), or may be served over enchiladas, tamales or burritos.

Moreover, Tex-Mex has imported flavors from other spicy cuisines, such as the use of cumin, introduced by Spanish immigrants to Texas from the Canary Islands and used in Berber cuisine, but used in only a few central Mexican recipes. And in recent years Tex-Mex has incorporated elements of traditional Mexican food into the cuisine, including the more creative use of chile peppers and the serving of so-called “street tacos” (which would be simply called “tacos” in Mexico).

The word “Tex-Mex” first entered the English language as a nickname for the Texas Mexican Railway, chartered in southern Texas in 1875. In train schedules published in the newspapers of the 19th century the names of railroads were abbreviated. The Missouri Pacific was called the Mo. Pac. and the Texas-Mexican was abbreviated Tex. Mex. In the 1920s, the hyphenated form was used in American newspapers in reference to the railroad and to describe Texans of Mexican ancestry.

Chili with garnishes and tortilla chips

In the mission era, Spanish and Mexican cuisines were combined in Texas as in other parts of the northern frontier of New Spain. However, the cuisine that would come to be called Tex-Mex originated with Tejanos (Texans of Mexican descent) as a mix of native Mexican and Spanish foods when Texas was part of New Spain and later Mexico.

From the South Texas region between San Antonio, the Rio Grande Valley and El Paso, this cuisine has had little variation, and from earliest times has always been influenced by the cooking in the neighboring northern states of Mexico. The ranching culture of South Texas and Northern Mexico straddles both sides of the border, where beef, grilled food, and tortillas have been common and popular foods for more than a century.[8] A taste for cabrito (kid goat), barbacoa de cabeza (barbecued beef heads), carne seca (dried beef), and other products of cattle culture is also common on both sides of the Rio Grande.

In the 20th century, Tex-Mex took on such Americanized elements as cheddar cheese, as goods from the United States became cheap and readily available.

In much of Texas, the cooking styles on both sides of the U.S.–Mexico border were the same until a period after the U.S. Civil War. With the railroads, American ingredients and cooking appliances became common on the U.S. side.

Fajitas, Wheat Tortillas as taco wraps

A 1968 Los Angeles Times feature wrote “[i]f the dish is a combination of Old World cooking, hush-my-mouth Southern cuisine and Tex-Mex, it’s from the Texas Hill Country.”

In France, Paris’s first Tex-Mex restaurant opened in March 1983. After the 1986 release of the film Betty Blue, Tex-Mex cuisine’s popularity in Paris increased.

 

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

March 9, 2019 at 6:00 AM | Posted in Kitchen Hints | 4 Comments
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Here’s a handy hint I had not heard of…………

Before chopping chillies, rub your hands with veg oil to prevent them from absorbing the chilli oils.

It’s Chili, Soup, or Stew Saturday….TEXAS RED CHILI SATURDAY

October 20, 2018 at 3:46 PM | Posted in It's Chili Soups or Stews Saturday, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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This week’s It’s Chili, Soup, or Stew Saturday is a recipe from the Wild Idea Buffalo website (https://wildideabuffalo.com/), TEXAS RED CHILI. Made using Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast, mild and medium hot chilies, onions, garlic, spices, and to heat up a bit more cayenne pepper. You can purchase the Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast and find this recipe back at the Wild Idea Buffalo website, be sure to check the site out for more recipes Wild Idea specials! Just love the Fall Season, it elevates all the Chili, Soup, or Stew recipes to a different flavor level! Enjoy and Eat Healthy in 2018!

TEXAS RED CHILI
For all of you non-bean chili lovers, this recipe is for you! In addition to the instructions below, I would gather and prep all of the ingredients before starting the process, as I found I needed to stir frequently. To avoid getting the chili to hot, I used a combination of mild and medium hot chilies. You can adjust the heat to your liking with cayenne pepper. I stayed true to the San Antonio recipe, using lots of onions, garlic, spices, and Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast. The preparation was easy and I have to say the end result was pretty darn good! I hope you enjoy it too. *A personal note on my introduction to Texas style chili can be found below recipe.

Ingredients:

1 – 3 lb. Wild Idea Buffalo Chuck Roast, rinsed, patted dry and cut into 1/4” pieces

4 – tablespoons olive oil

4– tablespoons butter

1/3 – cup masa/corn flour
2 – tablespoons Mexican oregano

2 – tablespoons cumin

2 – tablespoons Mexican chili powder

1 – tablespoon salt

1 – teaspoon black pepper

3 – Texas sweet onions, about 7 cups

6 – garlic cloves, diced, about 3 tablespoons

2 – cups organic beef broth

2 – cups water

4 – dried Ancho chilies, stems removed, seeded and coarse chopped

6 – dried medium red chilies, stems removed, seeded and coarse chopped

1 – fresh Serrano chili, stem removed, seeded and finely chopped

1 – tablespoon brown sugar
¼ – cup fresh squeezed lime juice

*optional ½ – teaspoon cayenne pepper

Preparation:
1 – Prep ingredients. Spread meat out onto a large baking sheet and sprinkle with the corn flour.

2 – In a large cast iron or heavy pot, over medium high heat, heat pan and add 2 tablespoons each of the butter and olive oil.

3 – Add half of the floured meat to the pan and allow to brown, stirring occasionally, scraping the bottom up to keep browning even. Remove browned meat from pan with a spoon and place on a plate. Repeat this step with the remaining butter, olive oil and meat.

4 – Add the first browned meat back to the pot, along with the seasonings, stirring to incorporate.

5 – Add chopped onions and garlic, again stirring occasionally, scraping up the bottom. Allow the onions and garlic to cook for about 7 minutes.

6 – Add the broth and water to the pot, stirring again as above.

7 – Reduce heat to simmer and cover the pot.

8 – Place all of the diced chilies in a food processor (small ones work best) and chop. After peppers are a bit more chopped, add ½ cup of the pot liquids to the processor and blend again, creating more of a paste.

9 – Add the pepper paste to the pot, stir to incorporate and cover. Allow the chili to simmer for a couple of hours, stirring as above occasionally.

10 – When the meat is tender, add the brown sugar and lime juice. Stir to incorporate, and allow to simmer a few more minutes.

11 – Taste, and adjust seasoning to your taste, adding the cayenne if more heat is needed.

https://wildideabuffalo.com/blogs/recipes/86324929-a-bowl-of-red-texas-style-chili

 

*My introduction to “RED”: On a trip headed south for a little winter quail hunting, we made a stop in San Antonio, at the Pearl restaurant. Listed on the menu was a bowl of “Red”. The waiter proudly informed us that it was real authentic Texas Chili, that it was all meat with no beans, and that the chef had just perfected their recipe. We ordered a cup to share – it was delicious. I was curious about the history of this famous Texas dish, so I did a little research.

As the waiter stated, the recipes I found for Texas chili were bean-less and loaded with onions and chilies. I learned a few other interesting facts including, that the chili pepper was not native to this continent. A Spaniard named Don Juan de Onate first brought chili peppers into New Mexico in 1598. They soon after became a staple throughout the southwest. It was later on around 1723, when Canary Island transplants had settled in San Antonio that the meat dish first became known. It was a replication from their homeland, made with local peppers, onions, garlic, and spices. This became know as a bowl of “Red”. Red chili soon became a favorite of the cowboys on the trail, with the camp cook using beef or buffalo. And, according to Lyndon Baines Johnson, “Chili concocted outside of Texas is usually a weak, apologetic imitation of the real thing.” I’m not so sure about that….

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