Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week – Grilled Corn Guac Turkey Burger

June 2, 2017 at 5:35 AM | Posted in Jennie-O Turkey Products | Leave a comment
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This week’s Jennie – O Turkey Recipe of the Week is a Grilled Corn Guac Turkey Burger. You’ll be using a couple of Jennie – O Turkey products to make this week’s recipe – a package JENNIE-O® ⅓ LB Turkey Burgers and JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon. Add on a charred ear of corn, avocados, chili pepper, red onion, bell pepper, and served on a brioche bun! Get that grill going with this week’s recipe. Enjoy and Make the Switch! https://www.jennieo.com/ 

 

 

 

Grilled Corn Guac Turkey Burger
What makes a grilled turkey burger even better? A great guacamole! This crowd pleaser is specially made with a charred ear of corn. It requires just a little more effort, but it’s totally worth it! Served up brioche buns, guests will be kissing the cook long after this meal ends.

INGREDIENTS

1 ear of corn
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 or 2 ripe avocados, peeled, pitted and diced
1 chili pepper, finely diced
½ small red onion, finely diced
1 lime, juiced
¼ cup chopped cilantro leaves
salt and pepper, if desired
1 (2-pound) package JENNIE-O® ⅓ LB Turkey Burgers
6 slices JENNIE-O® Turkey Bacon
2 each red bell pepper, char-grilled and sliced
6 each brioche buns, sliced
DIRECTIONS

1) Prepare grill for medium-high heat.
2) Brush ear of corn with oil. Grill 5 minutes or until kernels are golden brown. With knife remove kernels from ear of corn.
3) In medium bowl, mash avocado with fork. Add corn, chili peppper, onion, lime juice, cilantro and salt and pepper, if desired. Gently stir to combine.
4) Cook turkey burgers as specified on the package. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
5) While burgers are cooking, place bacon slices on grill and cook until crips. Always cook to well-done, 165°F as measured by a meat thermometer.
6) Grill red bell peppers until slightly charred; slice.
7) Place burger on bun bottom. Add peppers, bacon, corn guac mixture and bun top.
* Always cook to an internal temperature of 165°F.

RECIPE NUTRITION INFORMATION
PER SERVING
Calories 420
Protein 37g
Carbohydrates 27g
Fiber 6g
Sugars 6g
Fat 21g
Cholesterol 110mg
Sodium 740mg
Saturated Fat 5g
https://www.jennieo.com/recipes/1149-grilled-corn-guac-turkey-burger

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Pepper of the Week – Chili Pepper

November 5, 2015 at 5:52 AM | Posted in Pepper of the Week | 1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Green bird's eye, yellow madame Jeanette, and red cayenne peppers

Green bird’s eye, yellow madame Jeanette, and red cayenne peppers

The chili pepper (also chile pepper or chilli pepper, from Nahuatl chīlli is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. In Britain, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, Pakistan, India, and other Asian countries, the word “pepper” is usually omitted.

The substances that give chili peppers their intensity when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) and several related chemicals, collectively called capsaicinoids.

Chili peppers originated in the Americas. After the Columbian Exchange, many cultivars of chili pepper spread across the world, used in both food and medicine. Chilies were brought to Asia by Portuguese navigators during the 16th century.

India is the world’s largest producer, consumer and exporter of chili peppers. Guntur in the South Indian state of Andhra Pradesh produces 30% of all the chilies produced in India. Andhra Pradesh as a whole contributes 75% of India’s chili exports.

 

 

The five domesticated species of chili peppers are as follows:

Thai pepper, similar in variety to the African birdseye,

Thai pepper, similar in variety to the African birdseye,

* Capsicum annuum, which includes many common varieties such as bell peppers, wax, cayenne, jalapeños, and the chiltepin
* Capsicum frutescens, which includes malagueta, tabasco and Thai peppers, piri piri, and Malawian Kambuzi
* Capsicum chinense, which includes the hottest peppers such as the naga, habanero, Datil and Scotch bonnet
* Capsicum pubescens, which includes the South American rocoto peppers
* Capsicum baccatum, which includes the South American aji peppers
Though there are only a few commonly used species, there are many cultivars and methods of preparing chili peppers that have different names for culinary use. Green and red bell peppers, for example, are the same cultivar of C. annuum, immature peppers being green. In the same species are the jalapeño, the poblano (which when dried is referred to as ancho), New Mexico (which is also known as chile colorado), serrano, and other cultivars.

Peppers are commonly broken down into three groupings: bell peppers, sweet peppers, and hot peppers. Most popular pepper varieties are seen as falling into one of these categories or as a cross between them.
The substances that give chili peppers their intensity when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) and several related chemicals, collectively called capsaicinoids. Capsaicin is also the primary component in pepper spray, a less-than-lethal weapon.

When consumed, capsaicinoids bind with pain receptors in the mouth and throat that are responsible for sensing heat. Once activated by the capsaicinoids, these receptors send a message to the brain that the person has consumed something hot. The brain responds to the burning sensation by raising the heart rate, increasing perspiration and release of endorphins. A 2008 study reports that capsaicin alters how the body’s cells use energy produced by hydrolysis of ATP. In the normal hydrolysis the SERCA protein uses this energy to move calcium ions into the sarcoplasmic reticulum. When capsaicin is present, it alters the conformation of the SERCA, and thus reduces the ion movement; as a result the ATP energy (which would have been used to pump the ions) is instead released as thermal energy.

The “heat” of chili peppers was historically measured in Scoville heat units (SHU), which is a measure of the dilution of an amount of chili extract added to sugar syrup before its heat becomes undetectable to a panel of tasters; the more it has to be diluted to be undetectable, the more powerful the variety and therefore the higher the rating. The modern commonplace method for quantitative analysis of SHU rating uses high-performance liquid chromatography to directly measure the capsaicinoid content of a chili pepper variety. Pure capsaicin is a hydrophobic, colorless, odorless, and crystalline-to-waxy solid at room temperature, and measures 16,000,000 SHU.

 

 

 

Common peppers
A wide range of intensity is found in commonly used peppers:

Smoke-dried chipotle

Smoke-dried chipotle

Bell pepper 0 SHU
New Mexico green chile 0 – 70,000 SHU
Jalapeño 2,500-8,000 SHU
Bird’s eye chili 100,000-225,000 SHU
Habanero 100,000–350,000 SHU

Notably hot chili peppers
Some of the world’s hottest chili peppers are:

USA Carolina Reaper 2.2M SHU
Trinidad Trinidad moruga scorpion 2.0M SHU
India Bhut jolokia 1.58M SHU
Trinidad Trinidad Scorpion Butch T 1.463M SHU
England Naga Viper 1.4M SHU
England Infinity chili 1.2M SHU

 

 

Chili pepper pods, which are berries, are used fresh or dried. Chilies are dried to preserve them for long periods of

Red Bhut Jolokia and green bird's eye chilies

Red Bhut Jolokia and green bird’s eye chilies

time, which may also be done by pickling.

Dried chilies are often ground into powders, although many Mexican dishes including variations on chiles rellenos use the entire chili. Dried whole chilies may be reconstituted before grinding to a paste. The chipotle is the smoked, dried, ripe jalapeño.

Many fresh chilies such as poblano have a tough outer skin that does not break down on cooking. Chilies are sometimes used whole or in large slices, by roasting, or other means of blistering or charring the skin, so as not to entirely cook the flesh beneath. When cooled, the skins will usually slip off easily.

The leaves of every species of Capsicum are edible. Though almost all other Solanaceous crops have toxins in their leaves, chili peppers do not. The leaves, which are mildly bitter and nowhere near as hot as the fruit, are cooked as greens in Filipino cuisine, where they are called dahon ng sili (literally “chili leaves”). They are used in the chicken soup tinola. In Korean cuisine, the leaves may be used in kimchi. In Japanese cuisine, the leaves are cooked as greens, and also cooked in tsukudani style for preservation.

Chili is by far the most important fruit in Bhutan. Local markets are never without chilies in different colors and sizes, in fresh and dried form. Bhutanese call this crop ema (in Dzongkha) or solo (in Sharchop). Chili is a staple fruit in Bhutan; the ema datsi recipe is entirely made of chili mixed with local cheese. Chili is also an important ingredient in almost all curries and food recipes in the country.

In India, most households always keep a stack of fresh hot green chilies at hand, and use them to flavor most curries and dry dishes. It is typically lightly fried with oil in the initial stages of preparation of the dish. Some states in India, such as Rajasthan, make entire dishes only by using spices and chilies.

Chilies are present in many cuisines. Some notable dishes other than the ones mentioned elsewhere in this article include:

* Arrabbiata sauce from Italy is a tomato-based sauce for pasta always including dried hot chilies. Puttanesca sauce is tomato-based with olives, capers, anchovy and, sometimes, chilies.
* Paprikash from Hungary uses significant amounts of mild, ground, dried chilies, known as paprika, in a braised chicken dish.
* Chiles en nogada from the Puebla region of Mexico uses fresh mild chilies stuffed with meat and covered with a creamy nut-thickened sauce.
* Curry dishes usually contain fresh or dried chillies.
* Kung pao chicken (also spelled gong bao) from the Sichuan region of China uses small hot dried chilies briefly fried in oil to add spice to the oil then used for frying.
* Mole poblano from the city of Puebla in Mexico uses several varieties of dried chilies, nuts, spices, and fruits to produce a thick, dark sauce for poultry or other meats.
* Nam phrik are traditional Thai chili pastes and sauces, prepared with chopped fresh or dry chilies, and additional ingredients such as fish sauce, lime juice, and herbs, but also fruit, meat or seafood.
* ‘Nduja, a more typical example of Italian spicy speciality, from the region of Calabria, is a soft, pork sausage made “hot” by the addition of the locally grown variety of jalapeño chili.
* Paprykarz szczeciński is a Polish fish paste with rice, onion, tomato concentrate, vegetable oil, chili pepper powder and other spices.
* Sambal belacan (pronounced “blachan”) is a traditional Malay sauce made by frying a mixture of mainly pounded dried chillies and fermented prawn paste. It is customarily served with rice dishes and is especially popular when mixed with crunchy pan-roasted ikan bilis (sun-dried anchovies), when it is known as sambal ikan bilis.
* Som tam, a green papaya salad from Thai and Lao cuisine, traditionally has, as a key ingredient, a fistful of chopped fresh hot Thai chili, pounded in a mortar.
Fresh or dried chilies are often used to make hot sauce, a liquid condiment—usually bottled when commercially available—that adds spice to other dishes. Hot sauces are found in many cuisines including harissa from North Africa, chili oil from China (known as rāyu in Japan), and sriracha from Thailand.

 

 

 

Cubanelle peppers

Cubanelle peppers

Capsaicin is considered a safe and effective topical analgesic agent in the management of arthritis pain, herpes zoster-related pain, diabetic neuropathy, mastectomy pain, and headaches. However, a study published in 2010 has linked capsaicin to skin cancer. A 2015 cohort study in China found that eating foods containing chili peppers at least twice a week led to a 10 percent reduced mortality rate all else being equal and eating foods containing chili peppers 6 to 7 days a week had a 14 percent relative risk reduction in total mortality; there was an inverse correlation between eating fresh chilies and diabetes not found in remainder of the cohort.

 

Herb and Spice of the Week – Chili Pepper

August 7, 2014 at 5:51 AM | Posted in spices and herbs | 2 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Cayenne pepper

Cayenne pepper

The chili pepper (also chile pepper or chilli pepper, from Nahuatl chīlli of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. In Britain, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Malaysia and other Asian countries, the word “pepper” is usually omitted.

The substances that give chili peppers their intensity when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) and several related chemicals, collectively called capsaicinoids.

Chili peppers originated in the Americas. After the Columbian Exchange, many cultivars of chili pepper spread across the world, used in both food and medicine. Chilies were brought to Asia by Portuguese navigators during the 16th century.

India is the world’s largest producer, consumer and exporter of chili peppers. Guntur in Andhra Pradesh produces 30% of all the chilies produced in India, and the state of Andhra Pradesh as a whole contributes 75% of India’s chili exports.

 

Thai pepper, similar in variety to the African birdseye, exhibits considerable strength for its size

Thai pepper, similar in variety to the African birdseye, exhibits considerable strength for its size

Species and cultivars

The five domesticated species of chili peppers are as follows:

* Capsicum annuum, which includes many common varieties such as bell peppers, wax, cayenne, jalapeños, and the chiltepin
* Capsicum frutescens, which includes malagueta, tabasco and Thai peppers, piri piri, and Malawian Kambuzi
* Capsicum chinense, which includes the hottest peppers such as the naga, habanero, Datil and Scotch bonnet
* Capsicum pubescens, which includes the South American rocoto peppers
* Capsicum baccatum, which includes the South American aji peppers

 

The habanero pepper is known for its unique combination of intense flavor, aroma and heat

The habanero pepper is known for its unique combination of intense flavor, aroma and heat

Though there are only a few commonly used species, there are many cultivars and methods of preparing chili peppers that have different names for culinary use. Green and red bell peppers, for example, are the same cultivar of C. annuum, immature peppers being green. In the same species are the jalapeño, the poblano (which when dried is referred to as ancho), New Mexico (which is also known as chile colorado), Anaheim, serrano, and other cultivars.

Peppers are commonly broken down into three groupings: bell peppers, sweet peppers, and hot peppers. Most popular pepper varieties are seen as falling into one of these categories or as a cross between them.
The substances that give chili peppers their intensity when ingested or applied topically are capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) and several related chemicals, collectively called capsaicinoids. Capsaicin is also the primary component in pepper spray, a less-than-lethal weapon.

When consumed, capsaicinoids bind with pain receptors in the mouth and throat that are responsible for sensing heat. Once activated by the capsaicinoids, these receptors send a message to the brain that the person has consumed something hot. The brain responds to the burning sensation by raising the heart rate, increasing perspiration and release of endorphins. A 2008 study reports that capsaicin alters how the body’s cells use energy produced by hydrolysis of ATP. In the normal hydrolysis the SERCA protein uses this energy to move calcium ions into the sarcoplasmic reticulum. When capsaicin is present, it alters the conformation of the SERCA, and thus reduces the ion movement; as a result the ATP energy (which would have been used to pump the ions) is instead released as thermal energy.
The “heat” of chili peppers was historically measured in Scoville heat units (SHU), which is a measure of the dilution of an amount of chili extract added to sugar syrup before its heat becomes undetectable to a panel of tasters; the more it has to be diluted to be undetectable, the more powerful the variety and therefore the higher the rating. The modern commonplace method for quantitative analysis of SHU rating uses high-performance liquid chromatography to directly measure the capsaicinoid content of a chili pepper variety. Pure capsaicin is a hydrophobic, colorless, odorless, and crystalline-to-waxy solid at room temperature, and measures 16,000,000 SHU.

 
Chili pepper pods, which are berries, are used fresh or dried. Chilies are dried to preserve them for long periods of time, which may also be done by pickling.

 

Dried chilies are often ground into powders, although many Mexican dishes including variations on chiles rellenos use the entire chili. Dried whole chilis may be reconstituted before grinding to a paste. The chipotle is the smoked, dried, ripe jalapeño.

 

Many fresh chilies such as poblano have a tough outer skin that does not break down on cooking. Chilis are sometimes used whole or in large slices, by roasting, or other means of blistering or charring the skin, so as not to entirely cook the flesh beneath. When cooled, the skins will usually slip off easily.

Green and Red Chillies are used extensively in many parts of Indian cuisine

Green and Red Chillies are used extensively in many parts of Indian cuisine

Chilly as sold in daily market in India
The leaves of every species of Capsicum are edible. Though almost all other Solanaceous crops have toxins in their leaves, chile peppers do not. The leaves, which are mildly bitter and nowhere near as hot as the fruit, are cooked as greens in Filipino cuisine, where they are called dahon ng sili (literally “chili leaves”). They are used in the chicken soup, tinola. In Korean cuisine, the leaves may be used in kimchi. In Japanese cuisine, the leaves are cooked as greens, and also cooked in tsukudani style for preservation.

 

Chili is by far the most important fruit in Bhutan. Local markets are never without chili, always teemed with different colors and sizes, in fresh and dried form. Bhutanese call this crop ema (in Dzongkha) or solo (in Sharchop). Chili is a staple fruit in Bhutan; the ema datsi recipe is entirely made of chili mixed with local cheese. Chili is also an important ingredient in almost all curries and food recipes in the country.

 

Green and Red Chillies are used extensively in many parts of Indian cuisine

 
Sun-dried Red Chillies for a staple part of Telugu cuisinein India
In India, most households always keep a stack of fresh hot green chilis at hand, and use them to flavor most curries and dry dishes. It is typically lightly fried with oil in the initial stages of preparation of the dish. Some states in India, such as Rajasthan, make entire dishes only by using spices and chilies.

 

Chilies are present in many cuisines. Some notable dishes other than the ones mentioned elsewhere in this article include:
* Paprikash from Hungary uses significant amounts of mild, ground, dried chilies, aka paprika, in a braised chicken dish.
* Paprykarz szczeciński is a Polish fish paste with rice, onion, tomato concentrate, vegetable oil, chili pepper powder and other spices.
* Chiles en nogada from the Puebla region of Mexico uses fresh mild chilies stuffed with meat and covered with a creamy nut-thickened sauce.
* Mole poblano from the city of Puebla in Mexico uses several varieties of dried chilies, nuts, spices, and fruits to produce a thick, dark sauce for poultry or other meats.
* Arrabbiata sauce from Italy is a tomato-based sauce for pasta always including dried hot chilies as well as, Puttanesca sauce which is tomato based with olives, capers, anchovy and, sometimes, chilies.
* ‘Nduja a more typical example of Italian spicy speciality, from the region of Calabria. A soft, pork sausage made ‘hot’ by the addition of the locally grown variety of jalapeño chili.
* Kung Pao chicken (also spelled Gong Bao) from the Sichuan region of China uses small hot dried chilis briefly fried in oil to add spice to the oil then used for frying.
* Som Tam a Green Papaya Salad from Thai/ Lao cuisine traditionally has, as a key ingredient, a fistful of chopped fresh hot Thai chili, pounded in a mortar.
* Nam phrik is a traditional Thai sauce prepared with chopped fresh or dry chilies in fish sauce and lime juice.
* Sambal Belacan (pronounced ‘blachan’) is a traditional Malay sauce made by frying a mixture of mainly pounded dried chillies and fermented prawn paste. It is customarily served with rice dishes and is especially popular when mixed with crunchy pan-roasted ikan bilis (sun dried anchovies) when it is known as Sambal Ikan Bilis.
* Curry dishes which usually contain fresh or dried chillies.
Fresh or dried chilies are often used to make hot sauce, a liquid condiment – usually bottled when commercially available – that adds spice to other dishes. Hot sauces are found in many cuisines including harissa from North Africa, chili oil from China (known as rāyu in Japan), and sriracha from Thailand.

 
* Capsaicin is considered a safe and effective topical analgesic agent in the management of arthritis pain, herpes zoster-related pain, diabetic neuropathy, mastectomy pain, and headaches. However, a study published in 2010 has linked capsaicin to skin cancer.

 
* Capsaicin extracted from chilis is used in pepper spray as an irritant, a form of less-lethal weapon.

 
* Conflicts between farmers and elephants have long been widespread in African and Asian countries, where pachyderms nightly destroy crops, raid grain houses, and sometimes kill people. Farmers have found the use of chilies effective in crop defense against elephants. Elephants don’t like capsaicin, the chemical in chilies that makes them hot. Because the elephants have a large and sensitive olfactory and nasal system, the smell of the chili causes them discomfort and deters them from feeding on the crops. By planting a few rows of the pungent fruit around valuable crops, farmers create a buffer zone through which the elephants are reluctant to pass. Chilly-Dung Bombs are also used for this purpose. They are bricks made of mixing dung and chili, and are burned, creating a noxious smoke that keeps hungry elephants out of farmers fields. This can lessen dangerous physical confrontation between people and elephants.

 

Cubanelle peppers

Cubanelle peppers

* As birds have a lessened sensitivity to the effects of chili it can be used to keep mammalian vermin from bird seed.

 
Red chilies contain large amounts of vitamin C and small amounts of carotene (provitamin A). Yellow and especially green chilies (which are essentially unripe fruit) contain a considerably lower amount of both substances. In addition, peppers are a good source of most B vitamins, and vitamin B6 in particular. They are very high in potassium, magnesium, and iron. Their very high vitamin C content can also substantially increase the uptake of non-heme iron from other ingredients in a meal, such as beans and grains.

 

 

Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili

January 1, 2014 at 6:31 PM | Posted in beans, Crock Pot, spices and herbs, Wild Idea Buffalo | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili

 

 

 
The first post of 2014! Hope all of you had a great end of 2013 and a promising start to 2014. Started off windy and quite chilly around here this morning, But it cleared up and the sun came out and warmed to in the low 30’s. They say we have Winter weather moving in overnight and into Thursday though. 2-3 inches overnight and early morning then another 1-3 inches through Thursday, not the way to start 2014. But a good way to start the year off in food is to have Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili as my first dinner of the year!

 

 

 

3 Bean Buffalo Chili 001
I had made this batch of Chili back in December and had some in the freezer. I set it out overnight in the fridge to thaw. To reheat heat I just emptied the container in a sauce pan and heated it up on medium heat until heated through. Love this Chili!! For dessert later a Del Monte No Sugar Added Peach Chunk Cup.

 

 

 
To prepare it; The Chili has Wild Idea Buffalo Lean Ground Buffalo, Dark Red Kidney Beans, Chili Beans, Great Northern White Beans, and ton of great Spices! Just put it in the Crock Pot, on low, for about 8 hours and you got you some mighty tasty Chili! The Wild Idea Ground Buffalo has such a unique flavor, an almost sweet taste to it. I left the full recipe at the bottom of the post. The longer the Chili simmers the more incredible aroma fills the kitchen!

 

 

 

3-bean-buffalo-chili-0011
Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili

 

Ingredients

3-bean-buffalo-chili-0011

 

 

2 lb. Ground Wild Idea Ground Buffalo
2 Cans (6 oz.) Hunt’s Tomato Paste
1 Can (15 oz.) Chili Beans
1 Can (15 oz.) Kidney Beans, rinsed
1 Can (15 oz.) Great Northern Beans, rinsed
1/2 Cup of Water
1 Packet McCormick Chili Mix
1 White Onion (medium), Chopped or Minced
1 Jalapeno Pepper, Unseeded and Chopped
3 Cloves Minced Garlic
1 Tbs Ground Cocoa Chili Blend (McCormick)
1/2 Tsp Ground Chipotle Chili Pepper (McCormick)
1 Tbs. Ground Roasted Cumin
2 Tsps Ground Cinnamon
1 Tbs of Cilantro Leaves
5 Dashes of Frank’s Hot Sauce or to taste.
Shredded Cheese, I used Grated Dutch Gouda (Topping)
Oyster Crackers
Directions:
*Brown Buffalo in large saucepan on medium-high heat 10 min. or until no longer pink, stirring occasionally. Add all remaining spices and ingredients except 1 can of the tomato paste and the cheese and crackers.
*ADD to slow cooker and add in the remaining 1 can of tomato paste.
*COVER with lid. Cook on HIGH 3 to 4 hours (or on LOW 5 to 6 hours).

 

*Serve in bowl or mug with cheese and the oyster crackers, A Tablespoon of fat-free sour cream, or serve with some home made cornbread.

 

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Ground Round 99 free
Wild Idea Buffalo
Ground Round, 99% Lean
We use the Top Round and the Sirloin Tip cuts and remove all visible fat, for this super lean meat. It is rich and dark in taste and color. Substitute for any of your favorite ground dishes.

 

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week – Course II: Mussels in Tomato Broth with Buffalo…

December 4, 2013 at 12:40 PM | Posted in Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Mussels and Buffalo Chorizo, seems like a winning pair to me! It’s this weeks Wild Idea Buffalo recipe of the Week -Course II: Mussels in Tomato Broth with Buffalo Chorizo. It’s all from Jill O’Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo.

 

 

 

Course II: Mussels in Tomato Broth with Buffalo ChorizoWild Idea Buffalo Mussels in Tomato Broth with Buffalo Chorizo
By: Jill O’Brien

 

Note: You might be thinking that this will be too heavy for a second course, but it is light dish (as long as you don’t dip too much bread into the delicious broth). The flavors complement each other nicely and the chorizo adds a nice spice! The sauce can be made in advance, leaving the steaming of mussels for the last minute.

 

(serves 2)

 

Ingredients:

1 teaspoon olive oil +
4oz. Wild Idea Buffalo Chorizo
½ cup yellow onion, diced
1 clove garlic, chopped
½ teaspoon each salt & pepper
1 teaspoon crushed fennel seeds
1 teaspoon chili flake *optional
1 15oz. can, diced tomatoes
1 cup white wine
12 to 16 mussels, washed and de-bearded

 

Preparation:

1 – In a heavy sauté pan over medium high heat, heat 1-teaspoon olive oil. Crumble sausage into pan and cook until lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Remove sausage from pan, place in bowl and cover with saran. Set aside.
2 – Return pan to heat and add additional oil if needed. Add onion and garlic, sautéing until tender, about 5 minutes.
3 – Add seasonings, tomatoes and wine. Stir to incorporate and bring to a boil. *At this point you could remove from heat, cover and reheat when ready to serve.
4 – Add prepared mussels, cover and allow mussels to steam for 4 minutes. Most all of the shells should have popped open. Discard un-open shells.
5 – Add chorizo back to pan and stir to incorporate and heat.
6 – Serve direct from pan or spoon into serving bowls.
Garnish with green leek ringlets and lemon wedge. Serve with warm artisan bread.

Wine Pairing: You could stay with a dry Prosseco for this course or switch to a Dry Riesling or light red.

 

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/2013/course-ii-mussels-in-tomato-broth-with-buffalo-chorizo/

 

 

 

 
Wild Idea Buffalo – 1 lb. Chorizo SausageWild Idea Buffalo Chorizo Sausage
Our Mexican style Chorizo makes any dish more delicious! You will love our take on it, with a flavor profile that is every bit chorizo; seasoned with just the right spices, while our grassy bison meat adds a lighter nuance and powerful health benefits. One pound package of ground chorizo, not in links. 1 lb. Package

Ingredients: Buffalo, Organic Spices:[Black Pepper, Chili Pepper, Coriander, Cumin, Oregano, Paprika, Pimento, Red Pepper] Red Wine Vinegar, Salt

 

 
http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/collections/a-la-carte/products/1-lb-chorizo-sausage

Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili!

October 20, 2013 at 5:11 PM | Posted in beans, cheese, chili, Crock Pot, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili

 

Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili 001
A bit chilly this morning, 31 degrees! Had a light frost on the roof tops also. Cleaned the house early and then time for some Football! For dinner it’s a Classic Comfort Food, Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili. Chilly on the outside and Chili on the inside! (Sorry about that one)

 

 
I had some of the Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili in the freezer so I set a container of in the fridge overnight to thaw. I Love Chili especially this one that I make. I use Wild Idea Buffalo’s Ground Buffalo which is the best tasting Ground Buffalo that I’ve found. The 3 Beans I use are 1 Can (15 oz.) Chili Beans, 1 Can (15 oz.) Kidney Beans (rinsed), and 1 Can (15 oz.) Great Northern Beans (rinsed). Then I mix in 1 White Onion (medium Chopped or Minced), 1 Jalapeno Pepper (Unseeded and Chopped), 3 Cloves Minced Garlic, and 2 tablespoons of Jiff Reduced Fat Creamy Peanut Butter. First time I added Peanut Butter, a friend of mine that enters a lot of Chili Competitions told me to give it a try. It does give your Chili a rich flavor. For my spices I use 1 Packet McCormick Chili Mix, 2 Cans (6 oz.) Hunt’s Tomato Paste, 1 Tbs Ground Cocoa Chili Blend (McCormick), 1/2 Tsp Ground Chipotle Chili Pepper (McCormick), 1 Tbs. Ground Roasted Cumin (McCormick), 2 tbs Ground Cinnamon (McCormick), 1 Tbs of Cilantro Leaves (McCormick), and 5 Dashes of Frank’s Hot Sauce or to taste (I usually add a lot more dashes!). Throw in a 1/2 cup of Water and put the lid on the Crock Pot and set on low for 5-6 hours. Then you have yourself some good, comfort food, Chili! You can serve it in a bowl or mug and top it with your favorite Cheese or Chopped Green Onions with a side of Oyster Crackers. Another way to have it is served on top of a Johnny Cake (Cornbread) or have a side of Cornbread with it. Anyway you have it its delicious! For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

* With the Chili leftover I’m thinking a Chili and Cheese Omlet in the morning for Breakfast! *

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo ChiliICrock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili 004

 

Ingredients

 
2 lb. Ground Wild Idea Ground Buffalo
2 Cans (6 oz.) Hunt’s Tomato Paste
1 Can (15 oz.) Chili Beans
1 Can (15 oz.) Kidney Beans, rinsed
1 Can (15 oz.) Great Northern Beans, rinsed
1/2 Cup of Water
1 Packet McCormick Chili Mix
1 White Onion (medium), Chopped or Minced
1 Jalapeno Pepper, Unseeded and Chopped
3 Cloves Minced Garlic
1 Tbs Ground Cocoa Chili Blend (McCormick)
1/2 Tsp Ground Chipotle Chili Pepper (McCormick)
1 Tbs. Ground Roasted Cumin
2 Tsps Ground Cinnamon
1 Tbs of Cilantro Leaves
5 Dashes of Frank’s Hot Sauce or to taste.
Shredded Cheese, I used Grated Dutch Gouda (Topping)
Oyster Crackers

 
Directions:
*Brown Buffalo in large saucepan on medium-high heat 10 min. or until no longer pink, stirring occasionally. Add all remaining spices and ingredients except 1 can of the tomato paste and the cheese and crackers.
*ADD to slow cooker and add in the remaining 1 can of tomato paste.
*COVER with lid. Cook on HIGH 3 to 4 hours (or on LOW 5 to 6 hours).

 

*Serve in bowl or mug with cheese and the oyster crackers, A Tablespoon of fat-free sour cream, or serve with some home made cornbread.

 

 

 

 

Wild Idea Buffalo Ground Round 99 free
Wild Idea Buffalo
Ground Round, 99% Lean
We use the Top Round and the Sirloin Tip cuts and remove all visible fat, for this super lean meat. It is rich and dark in taste and color. Substitute for any of your favorite ground dishes.

 

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/

Baked Stuffed Poblano Peppers w/ Mini Ears of Corn with Chili Lime Butter

September 27, 2013 at 5:33 PM | Posted in baking, cheese, Jennie-O Turkey Products, Old El Paso Products, Peppers, Uncle Ben's Rice | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Baked Stuffed Poblano Peppers w/ Mini Ears of Corn with Chili Lime Butter

 

Baked Stuffed Poblano Peppers 006

 

 
Spent the morning at a local park, just enjoying the beautiful weather. Then the family started our outdoor sprucing up for the rest of the day. For dinner finally got around to the Poblano Peppers, after being distracted by the Rainbow Trout yesterday. For dinner; Baked Stuffed Poblano Peppers w/ Mini Ears of Corn with Chili Lime Butter.

 

 

I’ve had made Stuffed Jalapeno Peppers but it’s the first time I’ve stuffed the Pablano Peppers. They’re a lot easier to work with than the Jalapenos because their bigger and easier to handle. I started by splitting the Poblano Pepper in half and removed the seeds and ribs. Set them aside and gathered my stuffings for them. To stuff it with I used 1 packet Old El Paso Taco Seasoning, Jennie – O Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast (120 calories 0 carbs), Uncle Ben’s Whole Grain Medley Brown Rice and Quinoa with Garlic, and fresh grated Dutch Gouda Cheese. I cooked the Ground Turkey ahead of time that way when I stuffed it in the Pepper it wouldn’t take as long when baking. As I fried the Ground Turkey I seasoned with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, Roasted Ground Cumin, along with the Old El Paso Taco Seasoning Packet. After it was done I sit aside until I was ready to use for the Stuffing. The Uncle Ben’s Whole Grain Medley Brown Rice and Quinoa with Garlic was leftover from the other night’s dinner so I just had to reheat it a tad before adding into the Pepper.

 

Ready for the oven!

Ready for the oven!

 

I also made a Tomato Sauce to top or baste the Pepper in as it was baking. For the Sauce I used 1 8 oz. can of Tomato Sauce and 2 Green Onions that I diced up. In a small sauce pan I added the can of Tomato Sauce and the diced Green Onions and heated on medium heat for about 10 minutes and turned it on low until I was ready to use it. Having everything ready I Stuffed the peppers with the Ground Turkey and the Rice and Quinoa mixture. Ladled about half of the tomato sauce into a 13- by 9-inch casserole dish. Place the peppers on top and ladle over the remaining sauce. Sprinkle the Peppers with the Gouda Cheese, cover the casserole dish with foil and baked for 30 minutes. Removed the foil from the top and cooked until the peppers were very soft, about another 5 minutes. These came out incredible! Half of the Pepper was enough for me. The combination of the Peppers and all the ingredients worked well together to give some fantastic flavor! Have to keep this recipe.

 

 

I also boiled a couple of Green Giant Mini Ears of Corn that I buttered with a Chili Lime Butter. The Butter is easy to make. Just took I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter, 1 teaspoon Chili Powder, and zested 1/2 a Lime. Mixed it all together and done. The Stuffed Pepper and Corn makes one fine meal. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.

 

 

 

 

 

POBLANO PEPPERSPoblano Pepper
The poblano pepper is a mild chili pepper normally grown in Mexico. Fresh poblano peppers are wide and usually served stuffed. Poblanos have a mild taste like bell peppers. The Scoville Heat Unit is used to determine the level of heat in peppers. The measurement for a poblano pepper is 2,500 to 3,000 units, as compared to cayenne pepper, for instance, which has a heat unit of 35,000. Generally, poblano peppers have the same nutritional components as other chili peppers.

 

Poblano peppers, cooked or raw, are very low in calories and fat. The calorie and fat content does not change when cooked unless cooking oils or butter are added. One cooked poblano pepper has 13 calories. A poblano pepper has well under a half gram of fat, and only a small fraction of that is saturated fat. Poblano peppers do not have cholesterol. Extremely low-calorie foods, such as poblano peppers, make healthy snacks to maintain a low-calorie diet.

 
Cooked poblano peppers are low in carbohydrates. One poblano pepper contains 2.7 grams of carbohydrates, which is only 1 percent of the total daily value. Out of the 2.7 grams of carbohydrates, 1.1 gram is dietary fiber. This represents 4 percent of the recommended daily allowance of fiber. According to the Mayo Clinic, fiber has a number of health benefits, including regulating bowel movements, controlling blood sugar levels, reducing cholesterol and possibly aiding in weight loss.

Roasted Sun-Dried Tomato Turkey Breast w/ Boiled Rosemary New Potatoes and Green Beans

September 15, 2013 at 5:39 PM | Posted in greenbeans, Jennie-O Turkey Products, leftovers, low calorie, low carb, potatoes, Sea Salt, spices and herbs | 1 Comment
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Today’s Menu: Roasted Sun-Dried Tomato Turkey Breast w/ Boiled Rosemary New Potatoes and Green BeansJen O Turk Breast New Pot 007

 

 

 

It’s been another Fall like day around here today, about 39 degrees early this morning and 70 during the day. I went to Kroger early this morning, because it’s a lot closer than other stores, and noticed quite a few increases on prices! Just watch what you buy there. For dinner a new Jennie – O Turkey product, Sun-Dried Tomato Premium Portion Turkey Breast. For dinner tonight I prepared Roasted Sun-Dried Tomato Turkey Breast w/ Boiled Rosemary New Potatoes and Green Beans.

 

 
I had purchased the Jennie – O Turkey Sun-Dried Tomato Premium Portion Turkey Breast a couple of weeks ago at Walmart and had it in the freezer. I let it set in the fridge overnight to thaw. It comes already preseasoned in Sun-Dried Tomato, Chili Pepper, Garlic, and Onion. I added some Sea Salt and Ground White Pepper. To prepare I preheated the oven on 350 degrees and roasted it in a small roasting pan on a wire rack. It’s already precooked so I just more less reheated it for about 12 minutes, till it was heated through. Came out perfect! Nicely seasoned and very moist, nice to have these in the freezer for last minute dinner ideas.

 

 

For sides I boiled some New Potatoes. I boiled them in water that I seasoned with a Bay Leaf and Sea Salt, until they were fork tender. I also reheated some fresh Green Beans that my Mom had prepared the night before. For dessert later fresh sliced Peaches.

 

 

 
Jennie – O Sun-Dried Tomato Premium Portion Turkey BreastJennie o sun dried tomato turkey breast
Ready to cut and serve, hot or cold.
Product Features:
Gluten Free
Preseasoned
Nutritional Information
Serving Size 56 g Total Carbohydrates 1 g
Calories 50 Dietary Fiber 0 g
Calories From Fat 10 Sugars 1 g
Total Fat 1.0 g Protein 12 g
Saturated Fat .0 g Vitamin A 0%
Trans Fat .0 g Vitamin C 0%
Cholesterol 25 mg Iron 2%
Sodium 480 mg Calcium 0%
Our products are labeled in compliance with government regulations. It is always necessary to read the labels on the products to determine if the food product meets your required needs regardless of how the product is represented on this site.

 
– See more at: http://www.jennieo.com/products/96-Sun-Dried-Tomato-Premium-Portion-Turkey-Breast#sthash.bolSNJu3.dpuf

Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili!

September 12, 2013 at 5:30 PM | Posted in beans, bison, cheese, chili, Crock Pot, spices and herbs, Wild Idea Buffalo | 2 Comments
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Today’s Menu: Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili

Mom  and 3 Bean Buffalo Chili 004

 

 

Another hot, humid, and hazy day out there but they say Fall like weather for the weekend, I hope their right! We did get a brief shower but it just made it that much more humid. Reorganized the junk room, if that’s possible! Did throw away a lot of stuff that I don’t need. Starting on the Pantry tomorrow. For dinner one of my favorites, if not my top favorite, Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili! I love Chili and I love Buffalo so what’s not to like! When I first started making the 3 Bean Chili I used Lean Ground Turkey. Now I use Wild Idea Ground Buffalo. Either way is delicious and healthy.

 

 
Besides the Ground Buffalo I use 3 different types of Beans; 1 (15 oz.) Can of Joan of Arc Spicy Chili Beans, 1 Can Bush’s (15 oz.) Kidney Beans (rinsed), and 1 Can Bush’s (15 oz.) Great Northern Beans (rinsed). For spices I start with 1 Packet McCormick’s Original Chili Mix, 1 White Onion (medium), Chopped or Minced, 1 Jalapeno Pepper, Unseeded and Chopped, 3 Cloves Minced Garlic, 1 Tbs Ground Cocoa Chili Blend (McCormick), 1/2 Tsp Ground Chipotle Chili Pepper (McCormick), 1 Tbs. Ground Roasted Cumin, 2 Tsps Ground Cinnamon, 1 Tbs of Cilantro Leaves, and 5 Dashes of Frank’s Hot Sauce or to taste. For extra kick and flavor I added 1 White Onion (medium), Chopped or Minced, 1 Jalapeno Pepper, Unseeded and Chopped, 3 Cloves Minced Garlic, 2 Cans (6 oz.) Hunt’s Tomato Paste, and 5 Dashes of Frank’s Hot Sauce or to taste. Nothing but good!

 

 
To prepare it just brown 2 (1 lb.) packages of Wild idea Buffalo Ground Buffalo in large saucepan on medium-high heat 10 min. or until no longer pink, stirring occasionally. Add all remaining spices and ingredients except 1 can of the tomato paste and the cheese and crackers. Add to slow cooker and add in the remaining 1 can of tomato paste and 1/2 cup water. Cover with lid. Cook on HIGH 3 to 4 hours (or on LOW 5 to 6 hours). I usually cook it on low. Serve in bowl or mug with cheese and the oyster crackers, A Tablespoon of fat-free sour cream, or serve with some home made cornbread and ENJOY! For dessert later I tried a new one, Sans Sucre Mousse Cheesecake Dessert Cup. Something a little different and turned out real good! I left a another post on this and how to make it. Only 80 calories and 7 carbs per serving.

 

 

 

 

Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili3-bean-buffalo-chili-001
Ingredients
2 lb. Ground Wild Idea Ground Buffalo
2 Cans (6 oz.) Hunt’s Tomato Paste
1 Can (15 oz.) Chili Beans
1 Can (15 oz.) Kidney Beans, rinsed
1 Can (15 oz.) Great Northern Beans, rinsed
1/2 Cup of Water
1 Packet McCormick Chili Mix
1 White Onion (medium), Chopped or Minced
1 Jalapeno Pepper, Unseeded and Chopped
3 Cloves Minced Garlic
1 Tbs Ground Cocoa Chili Blend (McCormick)
1/2 Tsp Ground Chipotle Chili Pepper (McCormick)
1 Tbs. Ground Roasted Cumin
2 Tsps Ground Cinnamon
1 Tbs of Cilantro Leaves
5 Dashes of Frank’s Hot Sauce or to taste.
Shredded Cheese, I used Grated Dutch Gouda (Topping)
Oyster Crackers

 
Directions:

 
*Brown Buffalo in large saucepan on medium-high heat 10 min. or until no longer pink, stirring occasionally. Add all remaining spices and ingredients except 1 can of the tomato paste and the cheese and crackers.
*ADD to slow cooker and add in the remaining 1 can of tomato paste.
*COVER with lid. Cook on HIGH 3 to 4 hours (or on LOW 5 to 6 hours).

 

*Serve in bowl or mug with cheese and the oyster crackers, A Tablespoon of fat-free sour cream, or serve with some home made cornbread.

3 Bean Buffalo Chili w/ Johnny Cakes

July 13, 2013 at 5:55 PM | Posted in Ball Park Smoked Turkey Franks, chili, Crock Pot, spices and herbs, Wild Idea Buffalo | Leave a comment
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Today’s Menu: 3 Bean Buffalo Chili w/ Johnny Cakes3Bean Buffalo Chili Cornbread 003

 

 

 

Another beautiful day out, but they say that’s coming too an end. The high’s will be in the 90’s and the humidity almost unbearable. The heat index will be very high starting Sunday. All good days must end, I guess. Earlier today I went fishing here at our community lake. Only caught a few small Blue Gills not much biting but a real relaxing morning. For dinner tonight I didn’t want anything too heavy or filling but still wanted a hot and hearty meal. So I got in the freezer and grabbed the Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili I froze from the last time I prepared some. I prepared the Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili along with some Johnny Cakes.

 

 

 

The Chili has Ground Buffalo, Kidney Beans, Chili Beans, Great Northern White Beans, and ton of great Spices! Just put it in the Crock Pot, on low, for about 8 hours and you got you some mighty tasty Chili! I would use Ground Turkey to make this but for the past two times I’ve used the Ground Buffalo. Using the Buffalo gives it such a unique flavor, an almost sweet taste to it and it seems to hold up better with any added heat you add to it (Peppers or Hot Sauce). I left the full recipe at the bottom of the post. That’s the last of my Chili in the freezer so I’ll have to make another batch soon.

 

 

As the Chili was heating up I made some Johnny Cakes. To prepare these all you’ll need is: Pam w/ Olive Oil Non – Stick Spray, 1/4 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1 3/4 cups Buttermilk, and 2 cups Martha White Self Rising Enriched White Corn Meal Mix. Just mix all your ingredients in a large bowl. Spray your Pam on a Flat Top Griddle or large Skillet and preheat on medium low, I use the Flat Top Griddle. When the Griddle is heated add your batter. You can make the Cakes any size you want from half-dollar size to regular pancake size cakes. After the bottom side turns golden brown flip over and let the other side get golden brown. To serve I placed mine on a plate and topped it with my 3 Bean Buffalo Chili and Shredded Cheese. And now it’s Comfort Food Heaven! The Chili is a perfect pairing with Cornbread no matter how you prepare your Cornbread. At the bottom of the post I left a little history on the “Johnny Cakes”. There are various ways to fix Johnny Cakes, I make mine using the Martha White Corn Meal Mix.

 

 

 

Crock Pot 3 Bean Buffalo Chili3-bean-buffalo-chili-001

Ground Buffalo
Ground Buffalo
Ingredients
2 lb. Ground Wild Idea Ground Buffalo
2 Cans (6 oz.) Hunt’s Tomato Paste
1 Can (15 oz.) Chili Beans
1 Can (15 oz.) Kidney Beans, rinsed
1 Can (15 oz.) Great Northern Beans, rinsed
1/2 Cup of Water
1 Packet McCormick Chili Mix
1 White Onion (medium), Chopped or Minced
1 Jalapeno Pepper, Unseeded and Chopped
3 Cloves Minced Garlic
1 Tbs Ground Cocoa Chili Blend (McCormick)
1/2 Tsp Ground Chipotle Chili Pepper (McCormick)
1 Tbs. Ground Roasted Cumin
2 Tsps Ground Cinnamon
1 Tbs of Cilantro Leaves
5 Dashes of Frank’s Hot Sauce or to taste.
Shredded Cheese, I used Grated Dutch Gouda (Topping)
Oyster Crackers

Directions:
*Brown Buffalo in large saucepan on medium-high heat 10 min. or until no longer pink, stirring occasionally. Add all remaining spices and ingredients except 1 can of the tomato paste and the cheese and crackers.
*ADD to slow cooker and add in the remaining 1 can of tomato paste.
*COVER with lid. Cook on HIGH 3 to 4 hours (or on LOW 5 to 6 hours).

*Serve in bowl or mug with cheese and the oyster crackers, A Tablespoon of fat-free sour cream, or serve with some home made cornbread.

 

 

 

 

 

Wild Idea BuffaloWild Idea
Ground Round, 99% Lean
We use the Top Round and the Sirloin Tip cuts and remove all visible fat, for this super lean meat. It is rich and dark in taste and color. Substitute for any of your favorite ground dishes.

 

 

http://wildideabuffalo.com/

 

 

 

Johnnycakes – Pouring a batter similar to that of skillet-fried cornbread, but slightly thinner, into hot grease atop a griddle or a skillet produces a pancake-like bread called a johnnycake. This type of cornbread is prevalent in New England, particularly in Rhode Island, and also in the American Midwest and the American South. It is reminiscent of the term hoecake, used in the American South for fried cornbread pancakes, which may date back to stories about some people on the frontier making cornbread patties on the blade of a hoe.

 

johnny-cakes-005

Johnny Cakes (My way)

Ingredients:

Pam w/ Olive Oil Non – Stick Spray
1/4 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 3/4 cups Buttermilk
2 cups Martha White Self Rising Enriched White Corn Meal Mix

Directions:

Just mix all your ingredients in a large bowl.
Spray your Pam on a Flat Griddle or large Skillet and preheat on medium low, I use the Flat Griddle.
When the Griddle is heated add your batter. You can make the Cakes any size you want from half dollar size to regular pancake size cakes. After the bottom side turns golden brown flip over and let the other side get golden brown. Serve while warm and enjoy!

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